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vyy^w 



THE UNIVERSITY 



OF 



North Carolina 




CATALOGUE 



1904-1905 



THE UKTYEKSITY 



OF 



NORTH CAROLINA 



THE ONE HUNDRED 
AND TENTH SESSION 




THE CATALOGUE 



1904-1905 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 
CHAPEL HILL 



THE UNIVERSITY PRESS 
CHAPEL HILL 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 

Calendar 7 

The University 8-12 

Foundation and Government 8, 9 

Location 9 

Equipment 10, 1 

College Year 1 

Degrees 1 

Graduate Students 1 

Physical Training 1 

General Culture 18 

Religious Culture 12 

Discipline 12 

Medical Attendance 12 

Trustees 13,16 

Officers and Members of the Board 13-16 

Standing Committees 16 

Faculty and Other Officers 17-20 

Officers of Administration 17 

Officers of Instruction 17-20 

Other Officers 20 

Standing Committees of the Faculty 20, 21 

The College n 22-47 

Requirements for Admission 22-24 

Admission into the Freshman Class 21-25 

Admission of Students not Candidates for a Degree 25 

Course Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts 26, 27 

Courses for Students not Candidates for a Degree 25 

Courses of Instruction 29-47 

The Graduate Department 48-57 

Committee 48 



4 CONTENTS 

Enlargement of the Department 48 

Candidates for Graduate Work 48, 49 

Degrees r 49,50 

Courses of Instruction 51-57 

Department op Applied Sciences 58-Gl 

Courses of Study 58 

Degree 58 

Schedules of Courses 58-61 

Medals and Prizes. : ■. 62-63 

Pecuniary Aid and Expenses 64-68 

Fellowships and Scholarships 64, 65 

Free Tuition 65, 66 

Loan Funds '. 66 

Expenses 66, 67 

Dormitory Accommodations : 67, 68 

Regulations Regarding Students 69-77 

Registration and Assignment of Rooms 69 

Standing 69, 70 

Absences 70-72 

Examinations 73, 73 

Athletic and Other Organizations 74 

Fraternities 74 

Graduation 74, 75 

Certificates 75 

Conduct 75 

Schedule of Recitations 76 

Schedule of Examinations 77 

The Law Department 78-82 

Faculty 78 

Courses of Instruction 78-80 

Certificates 80 

Special Lectures 80 

The Degree of LL.B 80, 81 

Moot Court 81 

Expenses 81, 82 

Admission and Registration 82 

Summer School -, 82 



contents 5 

The Department of Medicine 83-97 

Faculty at Chapel Hill 83 

Faculty at Raleigh 84 

Foundation 84, 85 

The Department at Chapel Hill 85-92 

The General Plan of Instruction 85, 86 

Curriculum 86, 87 

Courses of Instruction •. 87-90 

Entrance Requirements 90, 91 

Prizes and Scholarships 91 

Expenses 91 

Admission and Registration 92 

The Department at Raleigh 92-97 

Eocation and Facilities 92 

Curriculum 92, 93 

Courses of Instruction 93-96 

The City Free Dispensary 96 

Degree 96, 97 

Expenses ' 97 

Admission and Registration 97 

The Department op Pharmacy 98-108 

Faculty ' 98 

Foundation .' 99 

Arrangement of Courses 99, 100 

Courses of Instruction 100-104 

Examinations 104 

Quizzes 1 05 

The Pharmaceutical Lahoratory 105 

Other Laboratories 105 

Reading Room and Library 106 

Requirements for Graduation. ., , •. . 106 

Theses '. 106, 107 

Prizes : 107 

Expenses 107 

Admission and Registration 108 

Students 109-131 

Graduates 109, 110 



6 CONTENTS 

The College 110-132 

The Law Department 122-126 

The Department of Medicine . 126-129 

The Department of Pharmacy 129, 130 

Summary 131 

The Summer School > 132-145 

Faculty 132 

Announcement ■ 133-135 

Courses of Study 135-138 

Expenses 138, 139 

Students 139-145 

The University Library 146-148 

The Gymnasium 149 

Laboratories and Museums 150-154 

The Physical Laboratory 150 

The Chemical Laboratory 150-152 

The Biological Laboratory 152, 153 

The Geological Laboratory 153, 154 

The University Organizations 155-160 

The Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies 165 

The Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society 156 

The North Carolina Historical Society 156, 157 

The Shakspere Club 157 

The Philological Club 157, 158 

The Economics Society 158 

The Modern Literature Club 159 

The Young Men's Christian Association 159, 160 

One Hundred and Ninth Commencement 161-165 

Speakers 161, 162 

Degrees in Course 162, 163 

Honorary Degrees ., 164 

Medals, Prizes, and Fellowships 164 

Certificates 164, 165 

The Alumni Association 166 

General Summary 167 

Index 168-170 



CALENDAE. 



1905. 

September 11-16. 

September 11, IS, IS. 

September 14. 
October 12. 
November 23. 
December 22. 



.4- 



1906. 

January 2, & 
January 4. 
February 22. 
May 1. 
May 15. 

June 3. 

June 4. 
June 5. 



June 6. 
June 13. 
September 10-15. 



Monday to Saturday. Examinations for Removal 

of Conditions. 
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday. Examinations for 

Admission into the College. Registration. 
Thursday. Lectures begin. 
Thursday. University Day. 
Thursday. Thanksgiving Day. 
Friday. Christmas Recess begins. 



Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday. Registration. 

Thursday. Lectures begin. 

Thursday. Washington's Birthday. 

Tuesday. Selection of Commencement Orators. 

Tuesday.' Last Day for the Delivery of Gradua- 
ting Theses at the Registrar's Office. 

Sunday. Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Sermon before the Y. M. C. A. 

Monday. Inter-Society Banquet and Reunions. 

Tuesday. Senior Class Day. 

Address to the Alumni. 

Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

Inter-Society Debate. 

Wednesday . Commencement Day. 

Summer Vacation begins. 

Wednesday. Summer School for Teachers begins. 

Summer Law School begins. 

Monday to Saturday. Examinations for Removal 
of Conditions. 



THE UNIVERSITY. 



Foundation and Government. The University was established in 
obedience to the first Constitution of the State, which was adopted in De- 
cember, 1776. A clause of Section XLI declared that "all useful learning 
shall be duly encouraged, and promoted in one or more universities." The 
Charter was granted by the General Assembly in 1789, the corner stone 
of the Old East Building was laid in 1793 and the University was opened 
in 1795. 

The title, preamble and first section of the Act of incorporation are as 
follows: 

"An Act to establish a University in this State. 

"Whereas in all well regulated Governments, it is the indispensable 
Duty of every Legislature to consult the Happiness of a rising Generation, 
and endeavor to fit them for an honourable Discharge of the social Duties 
of Life, by paying the strictest Attention to their Education: And where- 
as an University supported by permanent Funds, and well endowed, would 
have the most direct Tendency to answer the above Purpose: 

"I. Be it therefore enacted by the General Assembly if the Stale of North 
Carolina, and it is hereby enacted by the Authority of the Scone, That, Samuel 
Johnston, James Iredell, Charles Johnson, Hugh Williamson, Stephen Cabar- 
rus, Rvhard Dobbs Spaight, William Blount, Benjamin. Williams, John Sit- 
greaves, Frederick Hargeit, Robert Snead. Archibald Maclaine, Honourable 
Samuel Ashe, Robert Dixon, Benjamin Smith, Honourable Samuel Spencer, 
John Hay, James Hogg, Henry William Harrington, William Barry Grove, 
Reverend Samuel M'Corkle, Adlai Osborne, John Stokes, John Hamilton, 
Joseph Graham, Honourable John. Williams, Thomas Person, Alfred Moore, 
Alexander Mebane, Joel Lane, Willie Jones, Benjamin Hawkins, John Hay- 
wood, senior, John Macon, William Richardson Davie, Joseph, Dixon, Wil- 
liam Lenoir, Joseph M' Dow ell, James Holland and IF lliam Porter, Esquires, 
shall be and they are hereby declared to be a Body politic and corporate to 



LOCATION 9 

be known and distinguished by the name of The Trustees of the University 
of North Carolina;* and by that name shall have perpetual Succession and 
a common Seal; and that they the Trustees and their Successors, by the 
Name aforesaid, or a Maiority of them, shall be able and capable id Law 
to take, demand, receive and possess all Monies, Goods and Chattels that 
shall be given them for the Use of the said University, and the same 
apply according to the Will of the Donors, and by Gift, Purchase or Devise 
to take, have, receive, possess, enjoy and retain to them and their Success- 
ors forever, any Lands, Rents, Tenements and Hereditaments, of what Kind, 
Nature or Quality soever the same may be, in special Trust and Confidence 
that the same or Profits thereof shall be applied to and for the Use and 
Purpose of establishing and endowing the said University. "t 

The University is governed by a board of trustees elected by the Legis- 
lature, and is free from sectional, sectarian, or political control. The Gov- 
ernor of the State is ex-officio President of the Board of Trustees. 
• Article IX of the Constitution of 1876 contains the following provisions 
regarding the University: — 

"Seo. 6. The General 'Assembly shall have power to provide for the elec- 
tion of Trustees of the University of North Carolina, in whom, when 
chosen, shall be vested all the privileges, rights, franchises and endow- 
ments thereof, in anywise granted to or conferred upon the Trustees of said 
University; and the General Assembly may make such provisions, laws 
and regulations from time to time as may be necessary and expedient for 
the maintenance and management of said University. 

"Sec 7. The Geueral Assembly shall provide that the benefits of the 
University, as far as practicable be extended to the youth of the State free 
of expense for tuition; also that all the property which has heretofore 
accrued to the State, or shall hereafter accrue, from escheats, unclaimed 
dividends, or distributive shares of the estates of deceased persons, shall 
be appropriated to the use of the University." , 

Location. The seat of the University is Chapel Hill, Orange county, 
twenty-eight miles northwest of Raleigh. Two daily passenger trains run 
between Chapel Hill and University Junction, a station on the North Car- 
olina Railroad. The site for the institution was selected because of its 

* T he corporate name has been changed to The University of North Carolina. 
tLaws of the State of North Carolina, published by James Iredell, Edenton.MDCCXCI. 



10 THE UNIVERSITY 

healthfulness, its freedom from malaria, its supply of pure water, its beau- 
tiful scenery, and its central location in the State. 

Equipment. The University campus contains forty-eight acres of land, 
affording ample grounds for buildings and for all sorts of athletic sports. 
The University owns, contiguous to the campus, five hundred acres of for- 
est land, which is partly laid off in walks and drives. The University has 
eighteen buildings. 

The South Building contains two lecture rooms and thirty living rooms. 
The Old East Building contains two lecture rooms and twenty eight liv- 
ing rooms. 

The Old West Building contains two lecture rooms, the Historical Museum, 
and twenty-seven living rooms. 

Person Hall contains the Chemical Laboratory, Museum, and a lecture 
room. 

Gerrard Hall is used for morning prayers, for the meetings of the Young 
Men's Christian Association, and for public lectures. 
Smith Hall contains the University Library and the reading rooms. 
The New West Building contains the Dialectic Literary Society's Hall, 
the Pharmaceutical Laboratory, two lecture rooms, and nine living rooms. 
The New East Building contains the Philanthropic Literary Society's 
Hall, the Biological Laboratory and Museum, the Geological Laboratory 
and Museum, the Physiological Laboratory, the offices of the North Caro- 
lina Geological Survey, and three lecture rooms. 

Memorial Hall commemorates the illustrious dead of the University. It 
is used at Commencement for public exercises. 

The Alumni Hall contains the offices of administration, the Physical 
Laboratories and ten lecture rooms. 

The Carr Building, the gift of Gen. J. S. Carr, contains forty-two living 
rooms with every modern convenience. 

The Mary Ann Smith Building contains forty living rooms of the most 
modern type. 

The William Preston Bynum, Jr., Gymnasium is the gift of Judge Wil- 
liam Preston Bynum, in memory of his grandson, William Preston Bynum, 
Jr., of the class of 1893. It is furnished with modern apparatus, swim- 
ming pool, baths, lockers running track; and contains a trophy room and 
the office of the Instructor in Physical Training. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 11 

The Young Men's Christian Association Building, now in process of con- 
struction, will soon be finished, and will give greater efficiency to the val- 
uable work already being done by the Association. 

The Dissecting Hall, for the use of the Medical School, is apart from the 
other buildings. 

The Infirmary contains five rooms which are properly furnished for the 
care and treatment of the sick 

Commons is the dining hall of the University. The whole enterprise 
was made possible through the beneficence of Mrs Frederick Baker, of 
New York. Board is furnished at eight dollars a month Students wait 
upon the tables, and do other kinds of work, for which they receive their 
board. 

The Power House contains the electric lighting plant, the central heating 
plant, filter and pumps of the system of water supply, and the rooms of 
the University Press. 

The general equipment has been improved by a thorough system of sew- 
ers and baths, a supply of pure water in all the buildings, and hot water 
in all the offices, recitation rooms and living rooms. 

College Year. The College year begins on the second Thursday in 
September. Commencement is held on Wednesday before the first Thurs- 
day in June. The Summer vacation begins at Commencement Day and 
ends on the Wednesday before the second Thursday in September. There 
is a Christmas recess of about ten days. The twelfth of October (Univer- 
sity Day), Thanksgiving Day, and the twenty-second of February (Wash- 
ington's Birthday) are holidays. 

Degrees. The degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, 
Master of Arts, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of 
Medicine, Bachelor of Laws, and Graduate in Pharmacy are conferred by 
the vote of the Trustees, after the recommendation of the Faculty, upon 
candidates who have satisfied the requirements of residence and study 
at the University. Students who are not candidates for a degree may 
elect any studies they wish, devoting their time entirely to one or two 
subjects, or selecting groups of such subjects as suit their tastes and 
purposes. 

Graduate Students. Free instruction is given in the College to grad- 
uates of colleges and universities. Women are admitted to the higher 
courses of the University. 



12 THE UNIVERSITY 

Physical Training. Hearty encouragement is given to athletic sports 
and to all kinds of physical culture. The athletic field furnishes ample 
facilities for football and baseball. The Lake Track is admirably adapted 
for running, bicycling, and general track athletics. Fifteen tennis courts 
are located on the campus. Systematic exercise in the Bynum Gymnasium 
under a skilled instructor is required of all students in the College, except 
Seniors. 

General Culture The University endeavors to furnish such general 
culture outside the lecture rooms and laboratories as will broaden the 
minds and sympathies of young men. 

Religious Culture. Prayers are conducted in Gerrard Hall, with the 
reading of the scriptures and singing, every weekday morning except Sat- 
urday, at 8:30 o'clock. Attendance at this service is required of all mem- 
bers of the College, unless specially excused. Bible classes for young men 
are taught in each of the four churches of the village every Sunday. 
Religious exercises are held twice a week, or oftener in each church. A 
series of sermons is delivered aunually by the University Preachers, chosen 
by the Trustees from the various denominations Bible lectures are deliv- 
ered every Sunday morning in Gerrard Hall The Young Men's Christian 
Association meets three times a week, for prayer and other services, and 
conducts a series of Bible courses, which are numerously attended by the 
students. 

Discipline. The University endeavors to make young men manly and 
self-reliant, and to develop character by educating the conscience. The 
Faculty may, at their discretion, admonish, suspend, or dismiss students 
for neglect of duty or for misconduct. 

Medical Attendance. On the payment of a small annual fee, each 
student receives the careful attention of the University Physician. In 
this way the best medical advice is to be had at the least cost. 



TKUSTEES. 



ROBERT BRODNAX GLENN, Governor, President ex officio of the 

Board of Trustees. 
RICHARD HENRY BATTLE, Secretary and Treasurer. 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 
1907.* 



CHARLES BRANTLEY AYOOCK, Wayne. 

KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE, Orange. 

PABIUS HAYWOOD BUSBEE, Wake. 

BENNEHAN CAMERON, Durham. 

CHARLES MATHER COOKE, Franklin. 

ADOLPHTJS HILL ELLER, * Forsyth. 

JOHN WILLIAM FRIES, ' Forsyth. 

WILLIAM ANDERSON GUTHRIE, Durham. 

EDWARD JOSEPH HALE, Cumberland. 

DANIEL E. HUDGINS, McDowell. 

RICHARD HENRY LEWIS, Wake. 

JAMES ALEXANDER LOOKHART, Jr., Anson. 

JAMES SMITH MANNING, Durham. 

GILBERT BROWN PATTERSON, Robeson. 

JESSIE LINDSAY PATTERSON, Forsyth. 

WILLIAM SIMPSON PEARSON, Burke. 

FRANK BISANER RANKIN, Gaston. 

CHARLES MANLY STEDMAN, Guilford. 

HENRY WEIL, Wayne. 

WILLIAM THORNTON WHITSETT, Guilford. 

*The legal terra of office expires November 30 of the year indicated. 



14 



THE UNIVERSITY 



1909. 



ALEXANDER BOYD ANDREWS, 

RICHARD HENRY BATTLE, 

JULIAN SHAKESPEARE OARR, 

J0SEPHU3 DANIELS, 

WILLIAM HENRY DAY, 

AUGUSTUS WASHINGTON GRAHAM, 

ALFRED WILLIAMS HAYWOOD, 

JULIUS JOHNSON, 

HENRY ARMAND LONDON, 

DAN HUGH McLEAN, 

THOMAS WILLIAMS MASON, 

PAUL BARRINGER MEANS, 

LEE SLATER OVERMAN, 

JAMES PARKER, 

LOUIS JULIEN PIOOT, 

WILLIAM D. PRUDEN, 

THOMAS RUFFIN, 

JAMES SPRUNT, 

GEORGE GULLETT STEPHENS, 

JAMES WILLIAM WILSON, 



Wake. 

Wake. 

Durham. 

Wake. 

Wake. 

Granville. 

Alamance. 

Caswell. 

Chatham. 

Harnett. 

Northampton. 

Cabarrus. 

Rowan. 

Gates. 

Warren. 

Chowan. 

Mecklenburg. 

New Hanover. 

Mecklenburg. 

Burke. 



1911. 



EUGENE MOREHEAD ARMFIELD, Guilford. 

JAMES OSCAR ATKINSON, Alamance. 

CHRISTOPHER THOMAS BAILEY, Wake. 

VICTOR SILAS BRYANT, Durham. 

WILLIAM HYSLOP SUMNER BURGWYN, Halifax. 

PERRIN BUSBEE, Wake. 

FREDERICK LOUIS CARR, Green. 

RICHARD BENBURY CREECY, Pasquotank. 

BROOKE GWALTNEY EMPIE, New Hanover. 



TRUSTEES 



16 



John Washington graham, 
marmaduke j. hawkins, 
fernando godfrey james, 
lee t. mann, 
walter murphy, 
robert burwell red wine, 
george rountree, 
charles french toms; 
zebuxon baird walzer, 
francis donnell winston, 
charles william worth, 



Orange. 

Wa"rren. 

Pitt. 

Caldwell. 

Rowan. 

Union. 

New Hanover. 

Henderson. 

Davidson. 

Bertie. 

New Hanover. 



1913. 



STEPHEN CAMBRELENG BRAGAW, 
GEORGE WHITFIELD CONNOR, 
FREDERICK JACKs'ON COXE, 
JOHN SOMERVILLE CUNNINGHAM, 
FRANK ARTHUR DANIELS, ■ 
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN' DIXON, 
CLAUDIUS DOOKERY, 
RUFUS ALEXANDER DOUGHTON, 
ROBERT CLAUDIUS GRAY, 
FRANCIS W. HAYCOCK, 
JOHN SPRUNT HILL, 
JOHN ALLEN HOLT, 
CHARLES EARL JOHNSTON JONES, 
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN LONG, 
LEONID AS JOHN MOORE, Jr., 
CHARLES PRICE, 
NATHAN ALEXANDER RAMSEY, 
THOMAS SCOTT ROLLINS, 
ALFRED MOORE SCALES, 
FRANK SHEPHERD SPRUILL, 



Beaufort. 

Wilson. 

Anson. 

Person. 

Wayne. 

Cleveland. 

Wake. 

Alleghany. 

Wake. 

Granville. 

Durham. 

Guilford. 

Buncombe. 

Iredell. 

Pitt. 

Rowan. 

Durham. 

Buncombe. 

Guilford. 

Frauklin. 



16 THE UNIVERSITY 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE TRUSTEES. 

Executive Committee. 

Governor Robert Brodnax Glenn, Chairman, 

Alexander B. Andrews, Josephus Daniels, 

Richard H. Battle, Claudius Dockery, 

Fabius H. Busbee, John W. Graham, 

Julian S. Carr, Thomas S. Kenan, 

Richakd H. Lewis. 

Committee of Visitation. 

Alfred Moore Scales, Chairman, 
Perrin Busbee, Charles William Worth. 



FACULTY. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION. 

FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLE, Ph.D., D.Sc, LL.D., President. 

EBEN ALEXANDER, Ph D., LL.D., Dean. 

CHARLES ALPHONSO SMITH, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate Depart- 
ment. 

JOSHUA WALKER GORE, C.E., Dean of the Department of Applied 
Sciences. 

JAMES CAMERON MacRAE, LL.D., Dean of the Department of Law. 

RICHARD HENRY WHITEHEAD, A B., M.D., Dean of the Medical 
Department at Chapel Hill. 

HUBERT ASHLEY ROYSTER, A.B , M.D., Deanof the Medical Depart- 
ment at Raleigh. 

EDWARD VERNON HOWELL, A.B., Ph.G., Dean of the Department 
t 

of Pharmacy. 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION. 

FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLE, Ph.D., D.Sc, LL.D., Professor of 

Theoretical Chem islry. 
KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE, LL.D., Alumni Professor of History. 
JOSEPH AUSTIN HOLMES, S.B., State Geologist, Professor of Mining 

Geology. 
JOSHUA WALKER GORE, C.E., Professor of Physics. 
THOMAS HUME, D.D., LL.D., Professor of English Literature. 
WALTER DALLAM TOY, M.A., Professor of the Germanic Languages 

and Literatures. 
EBEN ALEXANDER, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of the Greek Language 

and Literature. 



18 THE UNIVERSITY 

WILLIAM CAIN, C.B., Professor of Mathematics. 

RICHARD HENRY WHITEHEAD, A.B., M.D., Professor of Anatomy 
and Pathology. 

HENRY HORACE WILLIAMS, A.M., B.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

HENRY Van PETERS WILSON, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

COLLIER COBB, A.M . Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

CHARLES STAPLES MANGUM, A.B., M.D., Professor of Materia Med- 
ico, aiid Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

EDWARD VERNON HOWELL, A.B., Ph.G., Professor of Pharmacy. 

MARCUS CICERO STEPHENS NOBLE, Professor of Pedagogy. 

JAMES CAMERON MacRAE, LL.D., Professor of Law. 

ISAAC HALL MANNING, M.D. , Professor of Physiology and Instructor 
in Bacteriology. 

CHARLES ALPHONSO SMITH, Ph.D., Professor of the English Lan- 
guage. 

tHUBERT ASHLEY ROYSTER, A.B., M.D., Professor of Gynecology. 

T WISCONSIN ILLINOIS ROYSTER, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

i AUGUSTUS WASHINGTON KNOX, M.D , Professor of Surgery. 

iRIOHARD HENRY LEWIS, A.B., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the 
Eye and of General Hygiene. 

•i-KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE, Jr., A.B., M.D., Professor of Diseases of 
the Ear, Nose and Throat. 

GEORGE HOWE, Ph.D., Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

iHENRY McKEE TUCKER, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics. 

tANDREW WATSON GOODWIN, M.D.-, Professor of Diseases of the 
Skin, and of the GenitOr Urinary System. 

T J AMES McKEE, M.D., Clinical Professor of Mental and Nervous Diseases. 

JOSEPH HYDE PRATT, Ph.D., Professor of Economic Geology. 

LUCIUS POLK McGEHEE, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law. 

ALVIN SAWYER WHEELER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Organic 
Chemistry. 

CHARLES LEE RAPER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics and of 
History. 

JAMES DOWDEN BRUNER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of the Romance 
Languages and Literatures. 

+ Resides at Raleigh, N. C. 






FACULTY 19 

WILLIAM CHAMBERS OOKER, Ph.D , Associate Professor of Botany. 

ARCHIBALD HENDERSON, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

THOMAS JAMES WILSON, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Latin. 

*EDWARD KIDDER GRAHAM, A.M., Associate Professor of the Eng- 
lish Language. 

JAMES EDWARD LATTA, A.M., associate Professor of Physics. 

JOHN McLAREN McBRYDE, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of the 
English Language. 

GUSTAVUS CHAMBERS CRAWFORD, A.M., Associate Professor of 
Physics. 

JAMES EDWARD MILLS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 



GEORGE McFARLAND McKIE, Instructor in Expression and in Eng- 
lish. 

WILLIAM STANLY BERNARD, A.M., Infractor in Greek. 

MARVIN HENDRIX STACY, A.M., Instructor in Mathematics. 

ROYALL OSCAR EUGENE DAVIS, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 

+JAMES WILLIAM McGEE, JR..M.D., Lecturer on Therapeutics'. 

jROBERT SHERWOOD McGEACHY, M.D., Chief of Dispensary. 

t WILLIAM DeBERNIERE MacNIDER, M.D., Demonstrator' of Clinical 
Pathology and of Medical Diagnosis. 

tLEONE BURNS NEWELL, A.B., Assistant Demonstrator of Clinical 
Pathology. 

NATHANIEL CORTLANDT CURTIS, Ph.B., B.S., Instructor in Draw- 
ing. 

JAMES CAMERON MacRAE, Jr., LL.B., Instructor in Law. 

ALFRED DANA BROWNE, Instructor in Physical Training. 



THOMAS BRAGG HIGDON, Assistant in French and. in German. 
WILLIAM PICARD JACOCKS, A.B., Assistant in French. 
EDGAR DAVID BROADHURST, Ph.B., Assistant in English. 

* Absent on leave, 1904-05. . 
t Resides at Raleigh, N. C. 



30 THE UNIVERSITY 

ALBERT WHITEHEAD LATTA, Ph.B., Assistant in Physics. 
"WILLIAMS McKIM MARRIOTT, S.B., Assistant in Chemistry. 
WADE HAMPTON OLDHAM, Assistant in Chemistry. 
EDGAR EUGENE RANDOLPH, A.B., Assistant in Chemistry. 
WILLIAM GRAY AMIOK, Assistant in Biology. 
WILLIAM HERBERT KIBLER, Assistant in Biology. 
ROBERT FREDERICK LEINBAOH, Assistant in Biology. 
HARRY ARDELL ALLARD, Assistant in Botany. 
ROBERT GILLIAM LASSITER, Assistant in Field Geology. 
GEORGE MALLETT MacNIDER, Assistant in Geology. 
REX WILLIAM PERRY, Assistant in Geology. 
HARRY MURRAY JONES, A.B., Assislantin Anatomy. 
WILBUR CALHOUN RICE, Assistant in Anatomy. 
CLARENCE FLAGLER, Assistant in Pharmacy. 

I 

OTHER OFFICERS. 

WALTER DALLAM TOY, M.A., Secretary of the Faculty. 

EBEN ALEXANDER, Ph.D., LL.D., Supervisor of the Library. 

LOUIS ROUND WILSON, A.M. , Librarian. 

CHARLES CARROLL BARNHARDT, Assistant in the Library. 

ROY MELTON BROWN, Assistant in the Library. 

CHARLES JAMES HENDLEY, Assistant in the Library. 

JAMES STEVENS KERR, Assistant in the Library. 

WILLIE THOMAS PATTERSON, Bursar. 

CHARLES THOMAS WOOLLEN, Registrar. 

JOHN FRANK PICKARD, Superintendent of Buildings. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY. 

The President is a member, ex officio, of all committees. 

Executive. President Venable, Deans Alexander, Gore, Smith. 
Curriculum. Professors Gore, H. V. Wilson, Battle, Alexander, Hume, 
Noble. 



FACULTY 21 

Auditing. Professors Toy, Cain, Latta. 

Athletics. Professors Mangum, Ooker; Mr. MaoEae. 

Catalogue. Professors Toy, Howe, T. J. Wilson; Mr. Stacy. 

Commons. Professors Toy, Williams; Mr. McKie. 

Library. Professors Alexander, Raper, Smith, Graham. 

Record. Professors Alexander, Smith, Henderson. 

Professional Schools. Deans MacRae, Whitehead, Howell. 

University Magazine. Professors Cobb, Hume, McBryde; Mr. Ber- 
nard. 

Young Men's Christian Association. Professors Hume, Wheeler, 
Bruner; Mr. McKie. 

Public Lectures. Professors Smith, Alexander, Henderson; Mr. 
McKie. 

Debates. Professors Hume, Wrlliams, Raper, Smith. 

Self Help. Professors Wheeler, Latta. 

University Press Association. Professors Latta, T. J. Wilson. 

University Sermons. Professors Toy, Raper, Henderson. 

University Press. Professor Cobb. 

Class Reunjons. Professors Latta, T. J. Wilson, Howe. 

Graduate Department. President Venable; Professors Smith, Gore. 
Alexander, Toy. 



\. 



THE COLLEGE. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Admission into the Freshman Class. 

Candidates for admission into the Freshman Class are received by exam- 
ination or by certificate. Entrance examinations are held in September. 
Students who present certificates of work accomplished at preparatory 
schools or colleges, may be admitted without examination, provided that 
the certificates are approved. The right to examine, however, is reserved, 
when such a course is deemed necessary. 

Certificates must be made out on the printed forms furnished on appli- 
cation to the Registrar, and must be deposited with that officer, properly 
approved, before the work can be officially credited. 

Subjects Accepted for Entrance. 

Eight subjects may be offered for entrance to the University. Appli- 
cants for admission to the course leading to the bachelor's degree are 
required to offer five or six of these subjects, according to the group of 
studies to be pursued after admission. 

* 
The requirements in each of these eight subjects are as- follows: — 

1. Greek. Three books of Xenophon's Anabasis, with questions on the 
more usual forms and constructions; simple narrative in English, based 
upon Xenophon's Anabasis, to be translated into Greek. 

2. Latin. Two books of Caesar's Gallic War; four orations of Cicero; 
six books of Vergil's Aeneid; Latin Grammar, including prosody: simple 
narrative in English, based upon the prose read, to be translated into 
Latin, 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 28 

8. *English. I. Grammar. Elements of Rhetoric. 
II. Literature. 

(a) For reading: — Shakspere's The Merchant of Venice and Julius 
Caesar; The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in The Spectator; Goldsmith's 
The Vicar of Wakefield; Coleridge's Ancient Mariner; Scott's Ivanhoe; 
Carlyle's Essay on Burns; Tennyson's The Princess; Lowell's The Vision 
of Sir Launfal; George Eliot's Silas Marner. 

(b) For study and practice: — Shakspere's Macbeth; Milton's L'Allegro, 
II Penseroso, Comus and Lycidas; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with 
America; Macaulay's Essays on Milton and Addison. 

The candidate is expected to have sufficient knowledge of the books 
grouped under (a) to enable him to answer general questions on their sub- 
stance. The form of the examination will be the composition of paragraphs 
on a number of topics connected witli the works. The ability of the candi- 
date to express his ideas in clear accurate English is a main consideration. 
No applicant should present himself who is notably deficient in spelling, 
grammar or paragraphing. Under group (b) are enumerated the works 
that are to be carefully studied. The questions will be upon subject mat- 
ter and structure. 

4. History. Either of the following courses: 

(a) The histories of the United States, Greece and Rome as outlined in 
the best text books for high schools. 

(6) The histories of the United States and England as outlined in the 
best text books for high schools. 

5. Mathematics. A good working knowledge of Arithmetic, including 
fundamental operations (particularly on common and decimal fractious), 
compound numbers, percentage, interest and extraction of square root. 
Problems that are much more easily solved by Algebra are not included 
here. The whole of a high school Algebra and a college Algebra to quad- 
ratics. The first three books of Plane Geometry. 

6. German. A thorough knowledge of the inflections, including the 
most common strong verbs; acquaintance with the ordinary laws of Ger- 
man syntax; such facility in translation as is gained by a careful study of 
at least 150 duodecimo pages of ordinary modern German prose; ability to 
translate into German simple sentences based on the passage assigned for 
examination; accurate pronunciation. 

* These requirements are uniform with those of the leading colleges in the United 
States. 



24 THE COLLEGE 

7. French. Similar to the requirements stated for German, save that 
the applicant should have read at least 200 duodecimo pages of ordinary 
modern French prose. 

It is recommended that the preparation for the entrance examinations in 
German and French be extended over two full school years, with four reci- 
tation periods per week, so as to allow time for short lessons with dictation 
exercises, oral practice and frequent reviews. 

8. Physics. The whole of an elementary course such as is contained 
in Carhart and Chute's High School Physics or its equivalent, embracing 
the work of at least one session of nine months. 

Grouping of Subjects. 

All candidates for admission to the Freshman Class must offer, prepara- 
tion in Mathematics, in English, in History, and in addition, in the sub- 
jects designated in one of the following groups: 
Group 1. Latin; Greek. 

Group 2. Latin or Greek; French or German; Physics. 
Group 3. French; German; Physics. 
When applicants have had no preparation in Greek or in French or in 
German or in Physics, the requirement may be satisfied by pursuing the 
corresponding courses in College. But these studies will not then be 
counted as any part of the requirement for the bachelor's degree. 

Examinations. 

All candidates for admission into the Freshman Class must assemble in 
Gerrard Hall at 9 a. m. Monday, September 11, 190.5, for preliminary regis- 
tration. They will there be assigned to rooms for examination. 

Order of Examinations. 

Monday, September 11. 
10 a. M.-l p. m. Latin. 3-5 p. &t. History. 

Tuesday, September 12. 
10 a. M.-l p. m. Mathematics. 3-5 p. m. English. 

Wednesday, September IS. 
10 a. M.-l p. m. Greek and Physics. 3-5 p. m. French and German. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 25 

Arrangements have been made with certain schools in the State whereby 
examinations for admission may be held in May also, at the schools. 

A student who fails to pass in any subject required for admission will 
be conditioned in that subject. Such conditions must be removed before 
the beginning of the Sophomore year. He will receive no final mark in 
the May examination of the Freshman year in the department in which 
such condition occurs until the condition is removed. Nor will he be 
admitted to the work of the Sophomore year in any department until all 
entrance conditions are removed. 

Admission to Advanced Standing. 

A candidate for advanced standing may be admitted to the Sophomore, 
Junior, or Senior class, with or without complete examination. He is sub- 
ject not only to the examinations required of candidates for admission into 
the Freshman Class, but to special examinations both in all the required 
studies already pursued by the class which he desires to enter, and in as 
many elective studies as would have been required of him as a member of 
that class. When satisfied with the apparent fitness of the candidate, the 
examining committee may, in spite of his deficiencies in some studies, 
admit him to an advanced class; but a candidate so admitted is not recom- 
mended for the degree until his deficiencies are made good. The examin- 
ing committee may accept also, with proper restrictions, the official report 
of work satisfactorily completed at a college or university of good standing, 
in place of an examination upon such previous work. 

A candidate for advanced standing should present himself for examina- 
tion on the same days and at the same hours with candidates for admission 
into the Freshman Class. 

Admission of Students not Candidates for a Degree. 

A student who desires to pursue a course of study, without becoming a 
candidate for a degree, may be admitted into the College upon the presen- 
tation of a certificate from the college or university last attended, or by 
passing satisfactory examinations on at least three subjects required for 
entrance. English must be one of the subjects offered. A candidate so 
admitted enjoys the same privileges as other members of the College, and 
is subject to the same regulations, 



COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS. 



In order to be recommended for the Bachelor's degree, the student must 
have passed satisfactory examinations in all the studies required in one of 
the groups prescribed for the Freshman and Sophomore years, and in a 
number of elective studies during the Junior and Senior years sufficient to 
amount to an average of fifteen hours of lecture or recitation per week for 
each of these years. Duly approved certificates of work accomplished at 
other colleges or universities will be credited without examination. 

The group of studies selected for the Freshman and Sophomore years 
must correspond to the group of subjects offered for entrance. 

Freshman Year. 

GROUP 1. English 1 (3)*; Mathematics 1 (4); Greek 1 (4); Latin 1 (4). 

Group 2. English 1 (3); Mathematics 1 (4); Greek 1 (4) or Latin 1 (4); 
German 2 (3) or French 2 (3); German 1 (3) or French 1 (3) or History 1 (8). 

Group 3. English 1 (3); Mathematics 1 (4): German 2 (3) or French 2 
(3), and six hours from the following: Spanish 1 (3); History 1 (3); 
Geology 1 (3). 

Sophomore Year. 

Group 1. English 2 (3); Greek 2 (3) or Latin 2 (3); and six hours from 
the following: Greek 2 (3); Latin 2 (3); German 1 (3); French 1 (3); and 
three hours from the following: Mathematics 2 (3); Chemistry 1 (8); 
Physics 1 (3). 

Group 2. English 2 (3); and six hours from the following: Greek 2 (3); 
Latin 2 (3); German 2 (3); French 2 (3); German 1 (3); French 1 (3); and 
six hours from the following: Mathematics 2 (3); Chemistry 1 (3); Phys- 
ics 1 (3). 

* Numerals In parentheses indicate the number of hours per week in each study. 



COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE 27 

Group 3. English 2 (3); Mathematics 2 (3); Chemistry 1 (3); Physics 
1 (3); and three hours from the following: German 2 (3); French 2 (3); 
Geology 3 (3); Zoology 1 (3). 

Junior Year. 

Elective Studies amounting to fifteen hours per week, of which at least 
one study must be taken from each of the following groups: 

Group 1. English, Greek, Latin, German, French, Spanish, Italian. 

Group 2. History. Philosophy, Economics, Pedagogy. 

Group 3. Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Geology. 

Senior Year. 

Elective Studies amounting to fifteen hours per week, subject to the 
condition stated above for the Junior Year. 

The elective studies are those outlined in the Courses of Instruction 
(p. 29 ff. ) and not included in the studies designated as required in 
Groups 1. 2 or 3 of the Freshman and Sophomore years. Students 
are urgently advised to select definite lines of study on the princi- 
ple of continuity and symmetry. 

The selection made must in each case be submitted to the Dean of 
the Faculty for approval. 



COURSES FOB STUDENTS NOT CANDIDATES FOR THE 

DEGREE. . 

Elective studies may be selected by students who are unable to complete 
a course leading to the degree. Students intending to pursue these elec- 
tive studies must prove their qualifications according to the regulations on 
page 25. After satisfying these entrance requirements, they may elect 
such studies as they are qualified to pursue. These elective studies may 
be arranged as preparatory to teaching or to the study of law or medicine. 



28 THE COLLEGE 

For students intending to teach, the following course is suggested: 
First Year: English 1, Mathematics 1, History 1, Pedagogy 1, 2 and 5 

one study from the following group: Latin 1, Greek I, French 1 , German 1 
Second Year: English 2, Physics 1 or Chemistry 1, Pedagogy 2, 4 and 

6. Electives amounting to a total of six hours from the following group 

German, French, Greek, Latin, Mathematics, Geology, Physiology, His 

tory. 



COUESES OF INSTKUCTIOK. 



GREEK. 



Ebbn Alexander, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of the Greek Language and 
Literature . 

William Stanly Bernard, A.M., Instructor in Greek. 



Professor Alexander and Mr. Bernard. 
A. A course for students who have had uo opportunity of studying 
Greek in the preparatory schools. An Introductory Book. Bab- 
bitt's Greek Grammar. Xenophon's Anabasis. Four hours. 
Can be counted only for entrance to Group 1. 

1. Homer's Iliad, books I., II. and III. Review of important grammati- 
cal principles. Lysias, selected speeches. Reading at sight. Four 
hours. 

3. Plato, Apology and Crito; Aristophanes, Clouds; Euripides, Alcestis. 
Reading at sight. Lectures on Greek Literature. Three hours. 

3. Prose Composition, elementary course. One hour. 

Intended as supplementary to Greek 1 . Open also to those who are 
taking Greek 1 or 2. 

4. Lectures on old Greek Life. History of Greek Art, text-book and lec- 

tures. Two hours. 

5. Modern Greek. Rangab£'s Handbook. Bikelas's Stories. Newspa- 

pers. Two hours (spring term). 

6. Homer, rapid reading of the entire Odyssey. Two hours. 

7. Greek Drama: Euripides, Iphigenia among the Taurians; Sophocles, 

Antigone; Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound; Aristophanes, Frogs; 
Aristotle, Poetics. Three hours. 

: 9. Demosthenes, three Philippics. Two hours (spring term). 



30 THE COLLEGE 

10. Plato, Phaedo. Two horns (fall term.). 

14. The Acts of the Apostles. Translation, comparison of versions, and 
a study of New Testament grammar and diction. Two hours (/all 

term) . 

Courses 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, and 14 are open to students who have taken 

courses 1 and 2. 
For courses 8, 11, 12, see Graduate Department. 
A certificate is granted to a student who has completed with credit 

courses 1, 2 and 3, and four hours of elective work. 

Latin. 

George Howe, Ph.D., Pro/essor of the Latin Language and Literature. 
Thomas James Wilson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Latin. 

Professor Howe and Associate Professor Wilson. 

1. Cicero, De Seuectute and De Amicitia; Livy, Book I.; Horace, the 

Odes and Epodes. Fovr hours. 

Associate Professor Wilson. 

2. Horace, the Satires and Epistles; Plautus, Oaptivi; Terence, Phormio; 

Tacitus, Agricola and Germauia. Three hours. 

3. Latin Prose Composition, based on Cicero and Livy. One hoar. 

Intended as supplementary to Latin 1. Open also to students who 
are taking Latin I or 2. 

5. Pliny, selected Letters; Juvenal, Satires; Martial, selected Epigrams. 
Reading with especial reference to the private life of the Romans 
at the close of the first century A.D. Two hours. 

B. Cicero. The philosophical works (De Officiis and Tusculan Disputa- 
tions). The rhetorical works (Brutus and De Oratore). Two 
' hours. 
To be omitted in 1905-06. 
10. A course for teachers, embracing pronunciation . prosody, the art of 
reading Latin, and a classification of moods and tenses. Two 
hovrs. 

Professor Howe. 

4. Lucretius, De Rerum Natura; Seneca, moral essays. A comparative 



V 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 31 

study of the Epicurean and Stoic schools of philosophy. Two 
hours. 
To be omitted in 1905-06. 

7. The Administration of Rome. Lectures. Two hours (fall term). 

Open also to Sophomores who are taking Latin 2. 

8. History of Roman Literature. Lectures. Two liou/rs (spring term) . 

Elective under the same conditions as Latin 7. 

9. Roman elegiac poets. A detailed study of the lives and rapid reading 

of selected elegies of Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius and Ovid. 
Two hours. 

Courses 4, 5, 6, 9, 10 are open to students who have taken Latin 1 

and 2. 
For courses 11, 12, see Graduate Department. 
A certificate is granted to a student who has completed with credit 

courses 1, 2 and 3, and five hours of elective work. 

GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES. 

Walter Dallam Toy, M.A., Professor of the Germanic Languages and 
Literatures. 

Thomas Bragg Higdon, Assistant in German. 

German. 

Professor Toy and Mr. Higdon. 

1. Elementary Course. Grammar. Written exercises. Translation, 

sight reading, dictation. Three hours. 

Professor Toy. 

2. Advanced Course. Translation. Sight reading. Composition. 

Grammar. Three hours. 

German Literature. 

3. Schiller: Maria Stuart, Wallenstein'sTod; Goethe: Egmont, Iphigenie 

auf Tauris; Lessing: Minna von Barnhelm. Lectures on German 
Literature. Three hours. 
Open only to those who have taken courses 1 and 2. 



83 THE COLLEGE 

7. Goethe: Goetz von Berlichingen, Tasso, Dichtung und Wahrheit, 
Gedichte, Faust. Three hours. 

Germanic Philology. 

4. Middle High German. Tliree hours. 

Wright's Primer of Middle High German; Paul's Mittelhochdeutsche 

Grammatik. Baohmann's Mittelhoehdeutsehes Lesebuch. 
Translation into New High German. 

To be omitted in 1905-1906. 

5. Old High German. Three hour*. 

Braune's Althochdeutsche Grammatik Braune's Althoohdeutsohes 
Lesebuch. 

To be omitted in 1905-1906. 

6. Gothic. Three hours. 

Braune's Gotische Grammatik. Heyne's Ulfllas. Introduction to 
Germanic Philology. 

Courses 4, 5, 6 and 7 are open only to those who have completed Ger- 
man 3. For further description of these courses, see Graduate 
Department. 

A certificate is granted to students who have completed with credit 
courses 1, 2 and 3. 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES. 

Jambs Dowden Bruner, Ph.D., Associate Professor of the Romance Lan- 
guages and Literatures. 

Thomas Bragg Higdon, Assistant in French. 

William Picard Jacocks, A.B., Assistant in French. 

French. 

Associate Professor Bruner and Messrs. Higdon and Jacocks. 

1. Elementary Course. Grammar. Pronunciation. Written exercises. 

Rapid reading of easy prose. Reading at sight. Three hours. 

Associate Professor Bruner. 

2. The History of French Literature in the Nineteenth Century. Rapid 



COURSES OF 1 1NSTRUCTION 88 

reading of representative novels and dramas. Collateral reading. 
Three hours. 

3. The History and Theory of French Tragedy. Rapid reading of the 

tragedies of Corneille, Racine, Voltaire, and Victor Hugo. Con- 
stant reference, for purposes of comparison, to other great trag- 
edies, both ancient and modern. Lectures and discussions. Three 
hours. 
Open to those who have completed course 2 or its equivalent. 

4. The History and Theory of French Comedy. Rapid reading of the 

comedies of Moliere, Regnard, Marivaux, and Beaumarchais. 
Constant reference, for purposes of comparison, to other great 
comedies, both ancient and modern. Lectures and discussions. 

Three hours. 

Open to those who have completed course 2 or its equivalent. 
To be omitted in 1905-06. 

5. Old French Language and Literature, with special reference to the 

French element in English. Rapid reading of old French texts. 

Lectures on the history of French sounds and inflections. Two 

hours. 

Open only to those who have completed courses 2 and 3 or 4. 
To be omitted in 1905-06. 

For course for graduates, see Graduate Department. 
A certificate is granted to those who have completed with credit 
courses 1, 2 and 3 or 4 or 5. 

Spanish. 

Associate Professor Bruner. 
1. Elementary Course. Grammar. Pronunciation. Written exercises. 
Rapid reading of prose. Reading at sight. Three hours. 
To be omitted in 1905-06. 

Italian. 

Associate Professor Bruner. 
1. Elementary Course. Grammar. Pronunciation. Reading of easy 
prose. Reading and interpretation of Dante's Divine Comedy, 
partly in the original and partly in English. Three hours. 



84 THE COLLEGE 

ENGLISH. 

Thomas Hume, D.D. , LL.D., Professor of English Literature. 

Charles Alphonso Smith, Ph.D., Professor of the English Language. 

*Edward Kidder Graham, A.M., Associate Professor of the English Lan- 
guage. 

John McLaren McBryde, Ph.D., Associate Professor of the English Lan- 
guage. 

George McFarland McKie, Instructor in Expression and in English. 

Edgar David Broadhurst, Ph.B., Assistant in English. 

English Language. 

Messrs. McKie and Broadhurst. 

1. Rhetoric and Composition. The elements of effective prose composi- 

tion, with the preparation and criticism of themes. Three hours. 
Newcomer's Elements of Rhetoric. 

Associate Professor McBryde. 

2. (a) Advanced Composition. This course is supplementary to course 1. 

Expository and argumentative theme writing. Three hours (fall 
term) . , 

Baldwin's College Rhetoric, and Specimens. 

(6) A rapid survey of English Literature. Three hours (spring term) . 
Brooke's English Literature and George's Chaucer to Arnold. 

Professor Smith. 

4. (a) Essays and (b) Orations. Lectures on the essay and the oration as 

forms of discourse. Representative essays and orations read and 

analyzed. Construction of essays and orations. Three hours. 

(a) Lobban's English Essays, Cody's Selection from the Best English 
Essays, (b) Ringwalt's Modem American Oratory, Frink's New 
Century Speaker, Swift's Great Debate Between Hayne and Webster, 
George's Burke's Speeches on the American War, George's Select 
Speeches of Webster. 

6. Introductory Course in (a) Old English, (b) Middle. English, and (c) 
English Philology. Three hours. 

* Absent on leave, 1904-05. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 85 

(a) Smith's Old English Grammar and Exercise Booh (4th edition). 
(6) Mather's edition of Chaucer's Prologue, Knight's Tale, and 
Nun's Priest's Tale, Morris and Skeat's Specimens of Early English 
(Part II.). (c) Lectures on the beginnings of English Philology; 
Grimm's Law, Verner's Law, and the Law of Analogy. 

14. Fifteenth Century English, Prose and Verse. Two hours. 

Skeat's Specimens of English Literature from A.D. 1394 to 1579 (first 
hundred pages), Mead's Selections from Sir Thomas Malory's Morte 
d' Arthur, Baldwin's Inflections arid Syntax of the Morte d' Arthur, 
Browne's edition of The Taill of Rauf Coilyear, Gummere's Old 
English Ballads, Pollard's English Miracle Plays, and Pollard's Fif- 
teenth Century Prose and Verse. The lectures will discuss the place 
of the fifteenth century in literary history, the influence of the 
Scotch dialect, and the changes that the language underwent 
between Chaucer and Spenser. 

Open to those who are taking or have taken course 6. 
For courses 7 and 12, see Graduate Department. 



English Literature. 

Associate Professor McBrydk. 

3 A. History and Development of English Literature. Required reading. 
Reports. Two hours. 

Professor Hume. 

3. Poetics. The forms of poetry discussed and representative works 
studied. Two hours. 

5. Shakspere. Two hours. 

9. The Rise and Progress of the Drama from the Miracle Plays to Shaks- 
pere. Two hours. 

11. The Literary Study of the Bible. Critical survey of Job, the Psalms, 
Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Isaiah. Influence of the Bible on literary 
development and form. Two hours. 

13. The Development of Fiction from the Greek Romances to Scott. 
Eighteenth Century Romanticism. Two hours. 

Professor Smith. 

15. A comparative study of Tennyson and Browning. Two hours. 

A study of Browning's complete works, with Tennyson as parallel 
reading. Critical essays, with reports on sources and bibliography. 



36 THE COLLEGE 

Associate Professor Graham. 
16. English Poetry in the First Half of the Nineteenth Century. Two 
hours. 

The work of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, Byron, Shelley and 
Keats will form the chief subject matter for this course. The 
method pursued will be a combination of lectures, recitations and 
written reports. 

To be given in 1905-06. A similar course has been given in 1904-05 
by Associate Professor McBryde. 

Courses 5, 9, 11, 13, 15 and 16 are open only to those who have taken 

English 3A or English 3. 
For courses 8 and 10, see Graduate Department. 
A certificate is granted to a student who has completed courses 1-6 

and one additional elective course. 



Expression. 

Mr. McKie. 

1. Declamation. Theory and practice. Voice culture and gesture. Two 

hours. 

2. Theory of debate. Argumentation. Analysis of debates. Preparation 

of briefs. Practice in debating. Two hours. 
Open to those who have completed course 1. 



PHILOSOPHY. 



Henry Horace Williams, A.M., B.D., Professor of Philosophy. 



1. Psychology. Lectures, with text books. Three hours. 

2. Logic. Lectures, with text-books. The study of logic in life. Two 

hours. 

3. Ethics. Criticisms and discussions. Two hours. 

4. Philosophy. Lectures. Theses. Study of the forces that shape fife. 

Three hours. 



For course 5, see Graduate Department. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 87 

HISTORY. 

Kemp Plummer Battle, LL.D., Alumni Professor of History. 
Charles Lee Raper, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 
Marcus Cicero Stephens Noble, Professor of Pedagogy. 

Professor Noble. 

1. American History. A general course. Text and source-book. Three 

hours. 

Associate Professor Raper. 

2. Mediaeval European History. A general course covering the period 

400-1648. Textbooks, readings and lectures. Two hvurs. 
To be omitted in 1905-06. 

4. Modern European History. A general course covering the period 

1648-1900. Text-books, readings and lectures. Two hours. 
Given in alternate years. To be omitted in 1905-06. 

Professor Battle. 

5. English Constitutional History. A general course dealing largely 

with the constitutional and legal aspects. Three hours. 

6. North Carolina History. The political and constitutional development 

of the Colony and the State. Lectures. Theses on assigned topics 
required. Two hours. 

7. Constitutional History. A general survey of the history and principles 

of the constitutions of the leading nations, ancient and modern. 
A special study of the Constitution of the United States, with the 
principal judicial decisions thereon. Also lectures on the leading 
principles of International Law. Three lmurs. 

8. Bible History. Lectures each Sunday morning at the instance of the 

Young Men's Christian Association. 

a) Old Testament Characters. 

b) New Testament Characters. 
Not counted for a degree. 

9. Historical Seminary. Original research in the history of the United 



38 THE COLLEGE 

States and of North Carolina during the national and state period. 
Weekly reports required. Two hours. 
Open to Seniors who have passed on at least eight hours in history. 

Associate Professor Raper. 

10. American Colonial History. Lectures and research in the history of 

the English Colonies in North America. Two hours. 

Open to Seniors who have passed on at least eight hours in history. 
Given in alternate years. To be given in 190506. 

A certificate is granted upon the completion of courses 1, 5, 6, 7 and 

9, or any thirteen hours. 
For courses 11, 13 and 14, see Graduate Department. 



ECONOMICS AND FINANCE. 

Charles Lee Raper, Ph.D. , A ssociate Professor of Economics . 

1. A general study of the production and consumption of wealth. A 

special study of land, labor, capital and organization as factors in 
the production of wealth. Marshall's Principles of Economics, 
lectures and readings. Two hours. 

2. Public Finance. A general study of the principles of public expendi- 

tures and revenues, and of the relation of the State to industries. 
A special study of taxation and the tariff. Adams' Science of 
Finance, lectures and readings. Two hours. 

3. The history of industriaMife in England and the United States. Lec- 

tures, readings and reports. Two hours. 

Open to Seniors. 

To be omitted in 1905-06. 

4. Money and Banking. A general course in the principles, functions 

and forms of money and banking. A special study of current 
monetary problems. Scott's Money and Banking. Dunbar's Theory 
and History of Banking (2nd edition), lectures and readings. Two 
hours. 

5. Transportation. A general study of the principles and forms of the 

modern system of transportation. A special study of the Ameri- 



COURSES OP INSTRUCTION 39 

can railway system and its influence upon industrial life. Text- 
book, lectures and readings. Two hours (fall term). 

6. Labor. Labor as a factor in the production of wealth. Wages. 
Labor problems. Labor unions. Labor legislation. Lectures and 
readings. Two hours (spring term). 

The Economics Society meets twice a month for the discussion of im- 
portant current industrial questions. 
A certificate is granted upon completion of courses 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. 
For courses for graduates, see Graduate Department. 

MATHEMATICS. 

William Gain, C.E., Professor of Mathematics. 
Archibald Henderson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
Marvin Hendrix Stacy, A.M., Instructor in Mathematics. 
Nathaniel Cortlandt Curtis, Ph.B., S.B., Instructor in Drawing. 

Associate Professor Henderson and Mr. Stacy. 

1. Algebra, from Quadratics to Determinants (Wentworth's College- 

Algebra). Geometry from Book IV. through Solid Geometry 
(Wells's Essentials). Plane Trigonometry and Logarithms (Ash- 
ton and Marsh). Four hours. 

Professor Cain. 

2. Brief Course in Conic Sections (Ashton's Analytic Geometry). Ele- 

mentary Course in Differential and Integral Calculus. Three 
hours. 

The very elementary course in the Calculus is intended especially 
for students in the engineering courses. 

Associate Professor Henderson. 

3. Elementary Mechanics (Loney). Surveying (Raymond). Three hours. 

Mr. Stacy. 
3A. Higher Algebra (Charles Smith). Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 1. 

Mr. Curtis. 

3B. Graphics (Descriptive Geometry, Shades, Shadows and Perspective), 
Two hours. 



40 THE COLLEGE 

Professor Gain. 

4. Differential and Integral Calculus (Gibson) . Three hours. 

Prerequisite: brief course in Conic Sections (fall term of Mathe- 
matics 2) . 

The needs of students in both pure and applied Mathematics are 
consulted here. 

5. Burnside and Panton's Theory of Equations. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 2. 

Associate Professor Henderson. 

6. Differential Equations (Murray) . Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 4. 

7. Analytic Mechanics (Bowser) . Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 4. 

7 A. Hydraulics (Merriman) . Three hours . 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 7. 

Professor Cain. 

8. Mechanics of Materials, Stresses in Structures. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 7. 

10. Graphical Statics, Arches, Higher Surveying. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 3 and 8. 

A certificate is granted to students who have completed, with high 

grade, courses 1, 2 and 4. 
For courses 12, 18, 14, 15, 16, see Graduate Department. 

Drawing and Architecture. 

Mr. Curtis. 

1. Freehand Drawing. Two hours. 

2. Mechanical and Topographical Drawing. Tu-o hours. 

3. Mechanical Drawing. Three hours. 

4. Elements of Architecture. Two hours. 

Courses 1 and 4 are elective to Juniors and Seniors. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 41 

PHYSICS. 

*Joshua Walker Gore, C.E., Professor of Physics. 
James Edward Latta, A.M., Associate Professor of Physics. 
Gustavds Chambers Crawford, A.M., Associate. Professor of Physics. 
Albert Whitehead Latta, Ph.B , Assistant in Physics. 

Associate Professor Crawford. 

Elementary Physics. Lectures with text-book. Weekly written reviews. 

Three hours. 

A course for students who have not satisfied the entrance require- 
ment in Physics, and for students in Medicine and Pharmacy. 

Associate Professor Latta. 

1. General Physics. Lectures with text-book. Laboratory work. Three 

hours. 
Preparation required: Mathematics 1. 

2. Advanced Physics. Mechanics. Lectures, recitations and problem 

work. Two hours (fall term). 
Preparation required: Physics 1 and Mathematics 2. 

3. Advanced Physics. Heat and Light. Lectures, recitations and prob- 

lem work. Two hours (spring term). 
Preparation required: Physics 1 and Mathematics 2. 

Associate Professor Crawford. 

4. A general study of Electricity and Magnetism, with laboratory work. 

Direct current dynamos and motors, with testing and study of 
typical forms in the laboratory. Three hours. 
Preparation required: Physics 1 and Mathematics 2. 

Associate Professor Latta. 

5. Descriptive Astronomy. A general course. Lectures with text-book. 

Observations with telescope. Tiro hours. 
Preparation required: Physics 1 and Mathematics 1. 

Associate Professor Crawford. 

6. Thermodynamics. Three hours. 

* Absen ton leave, 1904-05. 



42 THE COLLEGE 

This study is based on Edser's Heat for Advanced Students, Ewing's 
Steam and. Other Heat Engines and Peabody's Thermodynamics of 
the Steam Engine. 

Preparation required: Physios 1 and Mathematics 2. 

Associate Professor Latta. 

7. Alternating Currents and Alternating Current Machinery. Four 

hours. 

Text-books: Franklin and Williamson's Alternating Currents and 
Bedell and Crehore's Alternating Currents. Lectures and problem 
work. Testing and study of alternating current machines in the 
laboratory. 

Preparation required: Physics 1 and 4. 

8. Primary and Secondary Batteries. Electric Lighting. Two hours 

(fall term). 
Preparation required: Physics 1. 

9. Electric Power Transmission. Two hours (spring term) . 

Preparation required: Physics 7. 

A certificate is granted to students who have completed courses 1, 

2, 3, 4 and 5. 
For courses for graduates, see Graduate Department. 



CHEMISTRY. 

Francis Preston Venable, Ph.D., D.Sc, LL.D., Professor of Theoretical 

Chemistry. 
Alvin Sawyer Wheeler, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Organic Chemis- 
try. 
James Edward Mills, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
Royall Oscar Eugene Davis, Ph.D., Instructor in Physical Chemistry. 
Williams McKim Marriott, S.B., Assistant in Chemistry. 
Wade Hampton Oldham, Assistant in Chemistry. 
Edgar Eugene Randolph, A.B., Assistant in Chemistry. 

Professor Venable and Dr. Davis. 
1. General Descriptive Chemistry. Lectures with laboratory work. A 
study of the elements and their compounds, including an intro- 
duction to organic Chemistry. Three hours. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 43 

Associate Professor Mills. 

2. Technical Chemistry. 

(a) Industrial and Agricultural Chemistry. Glass-making, acids, alka- 

lies, phosphates, fertilizers, foods, clothing, hygiene, etc. Three 
hours (fall term}. 

(b) Metallurgy. Mining, treatment of ores, smelting, chlorination , 

fuel, building materials, etc. Three hours (spring term). 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1. 

Associate Professor Wheeler, Mr. Marriott and Mr. Randolph. 

3. Qualitative Analysis. Laboratory work with lectures. Two hours. 
May be taken with Chemistry 1 . 

Associate Professor Mills. 

4. Quantitative Analysis and Assaying. Laboratory work, lectures and 

stoichiometric exercises. A grounding in analytical methods. 
Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1 and 3. 

Associate Professor Wheeler. 

5. Organic Chemistry. - Lectures. Two hours. Laboratory work. One 

or three hours. 

One or two hours may be devoted to experimental work in some 
special group, as the cellulose, the terpene, the pyridine or the 
alkaloid. 

May be taken with Chemistry 4. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1 and 3. 

Professor Vbnable. 

6. The Theories of Chemistry. Lectures. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 1, 8, 4 and 5. 

Dr. Davis. 

7. Physical and Electro-Chemistry. Lectures and text-books, with lab- 

oratory work. Application of electricity to chemical processes. 
Three hours. 
May be taken with Chemistry 8. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1-6 
inclusive. 

Professor Venable. 

8. Quantitative Analysis. Laboratory work. Gas analysis and exten- 

sion of course 4 in technical lines. Bacteriological examination of 



44 THE COLLEGE 

water (with Prof essor Manning) . Research. Five hours. 
Prereqnisite: Chemistry 1, 3 and 4. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed all the above 
courses except course 7, and has submitted a thesis upon some 
research successfully carried out in the laboratory. 

The Journal Club meets once a week. The current journals, Amer- 
ican, English, German and French, both the purely scientific 
and the technical, are reviewed by the students and instructors. 
Attendance is required of students in all courses except 1 and 3. 

For courses 9 and 10, see Department of Medicine and Department of 
Pharmacy. 

For courses 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15, see Graduate Department. 



BIOLOGY. 

Henry Van Peters Wilson, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 
William Chambers Coker, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 
William Herbert Kibler, Assistant in Biology. 
Robert Frederick Leinbach, Assistant in Biology. 
William Gray Amick, Assistant in Biology. 
Henry Ardell Allard, Assistant in Botany. 

Zoology. 

Professor Wilson and Assistants. 

1. General Zoology. An introductory course giving an outline of the 

classification and structure of animals, with consideration of the 
fundamentals of histology, embryology, and physiology, and some 
consideration of biological theories. Lectures with laboratory 
work. Three hours. 

2. Comparative Anatomy and Embryology of the Vertebrates. Study of 

types of fishes, amphibia, reptiles, birds, mammals. Development 
of the characteristic vertebrate organs in the frog and chick. 
Fundamentals of microscopic technique. Laboratory work with 
occasional lectures. Three hours. 

3. Comparative Anatomy and Embryology of the Invertebrates. Dissec- 

tion and microscopic study of types of the chief orders, with some 
consideration of their embryology. Laboratory work with occas- 
ional lectures. Three hours. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 46 



A certificate is granted to a student who has completed with credit 

courses 1, 2 and 3, and Botany 1. 
For courses for graduates, see Graduate. Department. 



Botany. 

Associate Professor Coker and Mr. Allard. 

1. General Botany. An introduction to the structure and classification 

of plants. Lectures with laboratory work. Three hours. 

2. Special Morphology of the Algae and Fungi, with attention to the 

culture of lower fungi, and the identification of mushrooms. Lec- 
tures with laboratory and field work. Three hours. 

8. Special Morphology of the Mosses, Ferns, and higher plants, with 
particular consideration of homologies. Lectures with laboratory 
and field work. Three hours. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed with credit 

courses 1, 2 and 3, and Zoology 1. 
For courses for graduates, see Graduate Department. 

GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY. 

Collier Cobb, A.M., Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

Joseph Austin Holmes, S.B., State Geologist and Professor of Mining 

Geology. 
Joseph Hyde Pratt, Ph.D., Professor of Economic Geology. 
Robert Gilliam Lassiter, Assistant in Field Geology. 
George Mallett MacNider, Assistant in Geology. 
Rex William Perry, Assistant in Geology. 

1. Elementary Geology: Lectures with field work; laboratory work on 

the common minerals and rocks. Three hours. 

2. Mineralogy. Lectures with laboratory and field work. Crosby's 

Tables and Dana's Text-book of Mineralogy. Two hours. 

3. General Critical Geology. Lectures with field work; laboratory work 

on rocks and fossils. Theses. Three hours. 



46 THE COLLEGE 

4. Economic Geology. Lectures with laboratory and field work. Ore 

deposits, economic minerals, soils, water supply. Three hours. 

5. Petrography. Lectures, laboratory work and theses. Two hours. 

8. Origin and Nature of Soils. Field work, laboratory work and theses. 

Three hours (spring term). 

Professor Holmes. 

9. Economic Geology of Nortli Carolina. In these lectures the economic 

geology of other portions of the Southern Appalachian region is 
also discussed. 

10. Mining in the Southern Appalachian Region. These lectures include 

a discussion of gold, silver, coal and iron mining. 

As supplementary to courses 9 and 10 students are expected to visit 
the mining regions described. 

Professor Pratt. 

11. Mineral and Ore Deposits. Lectures supplemented by laboratory and 

field work. Twenty- four lectures (spring term). 

12. Principles and Practice in General Mining. Lectures supplemented 

by visits to different mining regions. 

Professor Cobb. 

13. Advanced Geological Field- Work and Special Research. Study of the 

Deep River area of the Newark rocks. A brief examination of 

the Potomac, Eocene, Lafayette and Columbia deposits. Three 

hours (one term). 

This course is given in the summer. It covers five weeks, of which 
one is spent in Chapel Hill with daily meetings; the remaining 
four weeks are deyoted to field-work. Students who take this 
course will be expected to devote all their time to it. 

For courses 6 and 7, see Graduate Department. 

The Geological Seminary meets fortnightly for review and discussion 
of current geological literature, and for the presentation of orig- 
inal papers. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed with credit 
six courses and presented a thesis showing original research suc- 
cessfully carried out. 

PEDAGOGY. 

Marcus Cicero Stephens Noble, Professor of Pedagogy. 



COURSES OP INSTRUCTION 47 

1. The Science of Education. De Garmo's Essentials of Method. The 

practical application of scientific principles to the teaching of ele- 
mentary branches. A brief study of modern educational problems. 
Three hours (fall term) . 

2. The Art of Teaching. McMurray's General Method. A careful 

study of the principles and methods involved in successfully teach- 
ing those studies usually taught in the best public and private 
primary schools. Three hours (spring term). 

Preparation of model lessons according to pedagogical principles has 

a place in both courses. 
Courses 1 and 2 are open only to those who intend to teach. 
Both courses must be taken, before either will be counted. 

8. The Philosophy of Education. Science and Practice of Education, 
Herbart. Comparative study of the different systems of education 
in the several States of the Union. The development and arrange- 
ment of a High School course. Three hours (fall term). 

4. The General History of Education. The development of educational 

ideals in the past. The effect of the pedagogical doctrines of the 
great educators of the past upon modern educational systems. 
Seeley's History of Education. Monroe's Educational Ideal. Three 
hours (spring term). 

5. The study of childhood in transforming modern methods of studying 

and teaching educational science. Two hours (fall. term). 

6. Herbartian Pedagogy. The attempt is made in this course to inves- 

tigate the Herbartian movement in Germany and the United 
States. The works of Rein, Story, Ziller, Lange and others are 
studied. Two hours (spring term). 

Pedagogical theses will be required in all courses. 

For course 7, see Graduate Department. 

A certificate is granted upon the completion of courses 1-6 inclusive. 



THE GRADUATE DEPARTMENT. 



COMMITTEE. 



FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLE, Ph.D., D.Sc, LL.D., President. 
CHARLES ALPHONSO SMITH, Ph.D., Dean. 
JOSHUA WALKER GORE, C.E. 
EBEN ALEXANDER, Ph.D., LL.D. 
WALTER DALLAM TOY, M.A. 



ENLARGEMENT OF THE DEPARTMENT. 

The development of the University has made it necessary to enlarge the 
scope of the graduate work and to give it greater prominence. The growth 
of the Faculty has rendered it possible to offer many additional courses, 
and these courses are now numerous and important enough to form a dis- 
tinct department of the University. The principal subjects in which 
advanced instruction is now provided are these: Greek, Latin, Germanic 
Languages, Romance Languages, Old English (Anglo-Saxon), Middle Eng- 
lish, English Literature, Philosophy, History, Economics, Mathematics, 
Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Geology, and Pedagogy. 

CANDIDATES FOR GRADUATE WORK. 

Graduates of the University of North Carolina and of other universities 
and colleges of good standing are, on application to the President or Dean, 
ordinarily admitted to advanced courses of instruction, free of charge for- 
tuition. There is, however, a registration fee of ten dollars. An appli- 
cant for admission, unless a graduate of the University of North Carolina, 
is required to present bis diploma and a certificate of scholarship and char- 



COURSES OP INSTRUCTION 49 

acter. If in any department the preliminary training of candidates has 
not been snfficient to qualify them for strictly graduate work, they will 
be required to take such undergraduate courses as may be prescribed by 
the heads of the departments; but these courses will not be counted for 
hours in work leading to a graduate degree. 

Students who are not graduates may, if they prove themselves qualified, 
take graduate courses; but no graduate degree will be given to a student 
who does not already hold a Bachelor's degree from some institution of 
approved standing. 

All courses must be approved by the President or Dean. 



DEGREES. 

The University offers to graduate students advanced work leading to the 
degrees of Master of Arts (A.M.), Master of Science (S.M.), and Doctor of 
Philosophy (Ph.D.). 

Master of Arts. 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts may be either resident or 
non-resident, non-resident courses being given only to graduates of this 
University. The candidate in residence must complete satisfactorily one 
year of graduate work consisting of at least fifteen hours a week of recita- 
tions or lectures, eight hours of which must be taken from courses in the 
Graduate Department, the remaining seven from courses open only to 
Juniors and Seniors. The candidate shall select one major subject and 
two minor subjects. The course as a whole must have unity and must be 
pursued with definite aim. 

A thesis based on the major subject of study and showing capacity for 
original research, must be submitted on or before May 1st of the given 
year, and must be filed in typewritten form on or before May 15th. 

Candidates who have received the Bachelor's degree from the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina may be recommended for the Master's degree after 
at least two years of study, as non-resident students, the requirements 
being in all other respects the same as for resident students; and they must 



60 THE GRADUATE DEPARTMENT 

satisfy the Faculty by examinations and theses that they are worthy of 
recommendation for the degree. The work must be completed within the 
period of two years for which the registration is granted; otherwise a 
second registration fee must be paid at the expiration of two years. The 
fee for non-resident students is ten dollars. 

Master of Science. 

The degree of Master of Science is conferred in the Department of 
Applied Sciences (pp. 58-61) , under conditions similar to those stated above 
for the degree of Master of Arts. 

Doctor of Philosophy. 

A candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy is required to pursue, 
in residence at the University, a prescribed course of advanced study and 
research in one major subject and two allied minor subjects. In general a 
term of three years is required, but the degree may be secured in two 
years in the case of exceptional preliminary training in the major subject. 

These requirements of residence and study are, however, entirely sec- 
ondary. The degree is conferred not simply for faithful study in a de- 
terminate field of work for a prescribed period, but because of a high 
attainment in a special branch of learning, which the candidate must have 
manifested not only in examination, but by a thesis which gives evidence 
of independent research, and contributes to knowledge. The candidate 
should choose his major subject in a department in which he has already 
pursued, for a considerable period, a systematic course of study. To 
receive this degree, a knowledge of French and German will be found 
indispensable in most instances. The thesis must be accepted before the 
candidate may be admitted to examination. The examinations are both 
written and oral. They demand a minute knowledge of a special field of 
work as well as a general acquaintance with the department of learning 
in which the candidate offers himself for the degree. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 51 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

Greek. 

Professor Alexander. 

7. Greek Drama: Euripides, Iphigenia among the Taurians; Sophocles, 

Antigone; Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound; Aristophanes, Frogs; 
Aristotle, Poetics. Three hours. 

8. Prose Composition, advanced course. Two hours (fall term). 

11. Greek History: The selections from Greek Historians in parts I. and 

II. of Baumeister's Quellenbuch zur Alien Geschichte. Two hours. 

12. Bucolic Poetry: The Idyls of Theocritus, Bion, and Moschus. Two 

hours . 

Latin. 

Professor Howe. 

9. Roman elegiac poe.ts. A detailed study of the lives and rapid reading 

of selected elegies of Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid. 
Two hours. 

11. The study of a particular author or period in Roman literature. Prac- 

tice in rapid reading, translating the more difficult passages only. 
Two hours. 
Associate Professor Wilson. 

5. Pliny, selected Letters; Juvenal, Satires; Martial, selected Epigrams. 
Reading with especial reference to the private life of the Romans 
at the close of the first century A. D. Two hours. 

12. Lectures on comparative syntax of Greek and Latin; principles illus- 

trated from Homer and Terence. Two hours. 



Germanic Languages. 
Professor Toy. 

0. Gothic. Three hours. 

The text-books used are Braune's Ootische Orammatik and Heyne's 
Ulfilas. This course is intended to lay a foundation for the philo- 
logical study of the Germanic dialects. It usually alternates with 
Course 5 (Old High German). The journals at the disposal of 
students of Germanic philology are mentioned below under the 
department of English Language, p. 58. 



53 THE GRADUATE DEPARTMENT 

7. Goethe: Goetz von Berlichingen, Tasso, Dichtung und Wahrheit, 

Gedichte, Faust. Three hours. 

In connection with the interpretation of the texts, the life of Goethe 
will be studied. Selected chapters of Herman Grimm's Vorle- 
sungen, Scherer's History of German Literature, and Francke's His- 
tory of German Literature will be read. 

French. 

Associate Professor Bruner. 

3. The History and Theory of French Tragedy. Bapid reading of the 
tragedies of Corneille, Racine, Voltaire, and Victor Hugo. Con- 
stant reference, for purposes of comparison, to other great trag- 
edies, both ancient and modern. Lectures and discussions. Three 
hours. 

English. Language. 

The resources of the Graduate Department of the English Language 
have been greatly increased by the enlightened generosity of Mr. Eugene 
M. Armfield, of High Point, N.C., an alumnus of this institution, who has 
put at the disposal of the Department the annual sum of three hundred 
dollars for the purchase of books, pamphlets, journals, and other special 
studies in advanced English. 

Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy who elect advanced 
work in the English language as their major subject will be expected to 
take one or more courses in the Germanic languages. All graduate work 
in the English language presupposes English 6, or its equivalent, and a 
reading knowledge of German; but, in exceptional cases, English 6 and 
German 1 may be taken along with the English graduate courses. 

Professor Smith. 
7. Advanced studies in (a) Old English and (6) Middle English. Two 

hours. 

(a) Wyatt's or Heyne's Beowulf, Thomas Arnold's Notes on Beowulf, 
Forster's Beowulf- if aterialien, and the discussion of the Beowulf 
Saga in volume III. of the Grundi iss oler Germanischen Philologie. 
(b) Skeat's edition of Chaucer's Minor Poems and Legend of Good 
Women, Book IV. in volume II. of Ten Brink's History of English 
Literature, with select chapters from Lounsbury's Studies in Chau- 
cer and Ten Brink's Language and Metre of Chaucer, 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 68 

12. English Syntax. Two hours. 

Problems in advanced English grammar will be studied historically. 
The course will consist chiefly of lectures. Sweet's Syntax (vol- 
ume II. of his New English Grammar), Kellner's Historical Out- 
lines of English Syntax, Einenkel's Syntax (in volume I. of the 
Grundiss der Germanisclien Philologie), and recent theses on ques- 
tions of syntax'. 

14. Fifteenth Century English, prose and verse. Two hours. 

Skeat's Specimens of English Literature from A.D. 1394 to 1579 (first 
hundred pages), Mead's Selections from. Sir Thomas Malory's Morte 
d' 'Arthur, Baldwin's Inflections and Syntax of the Morte d' Arthur, 
Browne's edition of The Taill of Rauf Coilyear, Gummere's Old 
English Ballads, Pollard's English Miracle Plays, and Pollard's 
Fifteenth Century Prose and Verse. 

The lectures will discuss the place of the fifteenth century in liter- 
ature, the influence of the Scotch dialect, and the changes that 
English underwent between Chaucer and Spenser. 

Among the publications accessible to graduate students of English 
and German may be mentioned Anglia und Beiblalt, Englische 
Studien, Herrig's Archiv, Paul und Braune' s Beitnege, Publications 
of the Modern Language Association of America, Modern Language 
Notes, Modern Language Quarterly (London), Dialect Notes, Publi- 
cations of the Early English Text Society, Journal of English and 
Germanic Philology. 

English Literature. 

Professor Hume. 
8. Poetry and Criticism. A study of the art of poetry in general and of 

the principles of criticism. Two hours. 
10. Dramatic Seminary. The language, metrical forms, sources of plot 

and incident, construction of plays, comparative study of Shak- 

spere and other dramatists. Turn hours. 
13. The Development of Fiction from the Greek romances to Scott. 

Eighteenth Century Bomanticism. Two hours. 

Philosophy. 

Professor Williams. 
5. Epistemology. Lectures. Theses. A study of the Critical Philoso- 
phy. First year: Prolegomena and Practical Reason and the 
works that prepared the way for Kant. Second year: Kritik 
der reinen Vernunft. Three hours. 



54 THE GRADUATE DEPARTMENT 

History. 

Professor Battle. 

9. Historical Seminary. Original research in the history of the United 
States and of North Carolina during the national and state period. 
Two hours. 

11. The English Constitution. Research in the history of the formation 
and development of the Constitution of England. Two hours. 

18. The American Constitution. Research in the history of the forma- 
tion and development of the Constitution of the United States. 
Two hours. 

14. American politics. Research in the history and development of the 
political parties in the United States, and their struggles in Con- 
gress and before the people. Two hours. 

Associate Professor Raper. 

10. Colonial History. Lectures and research in the history of the English 
Colonies in North America. Two hours. 

Economics. 

Associate Professor Raper. 

3. The History of Industrial Life in England and the United States. 

Lectures, readings, and reports. Two hours. 
To be omitted in 1905-06. 

mathematics. 
Professor Cain. 

4. Differential and Integral Calculus (Gibson) . Three hours. 

5. Burnside and Panton's Theory of Equations. Three hours. 
8. Mechanics of Materials, Stresses in Structures. Three hours. 

10. Graphical Statics, Arches, Higher Surveying. Three hours. 
16. Advanced Differential and Integral Calculus (Byerly, Edwards). Lec- 
tures. Two hours. 
Associate Professor Henderson. 

6. Differential Equations (Murray). Three hours. 

7. Analytic Mechanics (Bowser). Three hours. 



COUBSES OF INSTRUCTION 55 

7A. Hydraulics (Merriman) . Three hours. 

12. Projective Geometry (Reye). Two hours. 

13. Solid Analytical Geometry (Smith, Salmon, Frost). Two hours. 

Physics. 

Associate Professor Latta. 

6. Thermodynamics. Three hours. 

This study is based on Edser's Heat for Advanced Students, Ewing's 
Steam and other Heat Engines and Peabody's Thermodynamics of 
the Steam Engine. 

7. Alternating Currents and Alternating Current Machinery. Four hours. 

Text-boks: Franklin and Williamson's Alternating Currents and 
Bedell and Crehore's Alternating Currents. Lectures and problem 
work Testing and study of alternating current machines in the 
laboratory. 

9. Electric Power Transmission. Two hours (spring term). 

Chemistry. 

Professor Venable and Associate Professor Wheeler. 

11. Research in Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry. Six hours. 

This course (with 12 and 13) is intended only for applicants for the 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy or properly equipped students 
who desire special training in advanced chemical research. It 
requires, in addition to the laboratory work, daily conferences 
with the professor and continual reference to the literature touch- 
ing the matter under investigation. The work is usually assigned 
by the professor, but by special permit, the student may elect to 
work upon problems to which he wishes to give particular atten- 
tion. 

Associate Professor Wheeler. 

12. Research work in Organic Chemistry. Six hours. 

Many lines of investigation are open in the cellulose field and other 
departments of Organic Chemistry. Investigations which have a 
bearing upon physiology may be undertaken, or the student may 
be guided in work of his own selection. 

Associate Professor Mills. 

13. Research in Physical Chemistry. Six hours. 

Acquaintance with the Calculus is required for this course. 



56 THE GRADUATE DEPARTMENT 

14. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Two hours. 

The elements are studied with the idea of showing the fundamental 
laws of Chemistry and the deepseated relations involved in and 
leading up to the Periodic System. Attention is also given to 
those portions of Inorganic Chemistry not usually dwelt upon in 
the regular courses. The applications of physico-chemical laws 
and generalizations are emphasized throughout the course. 

Associate Professor Wheeler. 

15. Lectures and Seminary work in special chapters of Organic Chemistry. 

Two hours. 

The Journal Club meets every other Monday evening for an hour. 
The current journals, American, English, German, and French, 
purely scientific and technical, are reviewed by the students and 
instructors. At stated periods special subjects are assigned and 
reported on at subsequent meetings. Attendance upon the meet- 
ings of the Club is required of all students taking the above courses. 



Zoology. 

Professor Wilson. 

2. Comparative Anatomy and Embryology of the Vertebrates. Study of 

types of fishes, amphibia, reptiles, birds, mammals. Development 
of the characteristic vertebrate organs in the frog and chick. 
Fundamentals of microscopic technique. Laboratory work with 
occasional lectures. Three hours. 

3. Comparative Anatomy and Embryology of the Invertebrates. Dissec- 

tion and microscopic study of types of the chief orders, with some 
consideration of their embryology. Laboratory work with occa- 
sional lectures. - Three hours. 

4. Animal Morphology. Advanced zoological work, with detailed study 

of problems in comparative anatomy or embryology. Laboratory 
work with use of classical text-books and original memoirs. Theses. 
Five or more hours. 

Botany. 

Associate Professor Coker. 

2. Special Morphology of the algae and fungi, with attention to the 
culture of lower fungi, and the identification of mushrooms. Lec- 
tures with laboratory and field work. Three hours. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 57 

3. Special morphology of the mosses, ferns, and higher plants, with 

particular consideration of homologies. Lectures with laboratory 
and field work. Three, hours. 

4. Plant Morphology. Advanced work in the embryology and anatomy 

of plants. The student is required to collect and prepare material 
for the microscopic study of special problems. Theses. Five or 
more hours. 

Geology. 

Professor Cobb. 

6. Advanced field work and special research in geology or geography. 

Problems assigned individually and work adapted to the profes- 
sional needs of the student. Three hours. 

7. Research course in historical geology. Three hours. 

Pedagogy. 

Professor Noble. 

5. The study of childhood in transforming modern methods of studying 

and teaching educational science. Two hours (Jail term). 

6. Herbartian Pedagogy. The attempt is made in this course to investi- 

gate the Herbartian movement in Germany and the United States. 
The works of Rein, Story, Ziller, Lange, and others are studied. 
Two hours (spring term). 

7. American Education. A study of the development of public and pri- 

vate school systems in the United States. Research and lectures. 
Two hours. 



DEPARTMENT OF APPLIED SCIENCES. 



FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLE, Ph.D., D.Sc, LL.D., President. 
JOSHUA WALKER GORE, C.E., Dean. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

Special courses of study are offered in this department, extending over 
four years, and combining instruction in certain Sciences and their appli- 
cations to the arts with other general studies deemed essential to a liberal 
education. 
There are four of these courses: 
I. Chemistry. 
II. Electricity. 

III. Civil Engineering. 

IV. Mining and Metallurgy. 

DEGREE. 

Each of these courses leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science (S.B.) , 
and a special certificate will be given on the completion of any one of them. 

SCHEDULES OF COURSES. 

The group of studies selected for the Freshman Year must correspond to 
the group of subjects offered for entrance. See page 24. 

I. Chemistry. 

freshman year. 
(Common to all of the four courses.) 



COURSES OP INSTRUCTION 59 

Group 1. English 1 (3); Mathematics 1 (4); Greek 1 (4); Latin 1 (4). 

Group 2. English 1 (3) ; Mathematics 1 (4) ; Greek 1 (4) or Latin 1 (4) ; 
German 2 (3) or French 2 (3); German 1 (3) or French 1 (3) or His- 
tory 1 (3) 

Groups. English 1 (3); Mathematics 1 (4); German 2 (3) or French 
2 (3); and six hours from the following: Spanish 1 (3); History 1 (3); 
Geology 1 (3) . 

sophomore tear. 

English 2 (3); Mathematics 2 (3); Chemistry 1 (3); Chemistry 3 (2); 

Physics 1 (3); German (3) or French (3). 

The modern language selected must be German, unless six hours of 
German have been taken or are being taken to complete the 
requirements of the Freshman Year. 

junior year. 

English 3 A (2); Chemistry 2 (3); Chemistry 4 (3); Chemistry 5 (5); 
Drawing 1 (2). 

senior tear. 

Chemistry 6 (2); Chemistry 7 (3); Chemistry 8 (5); Geology 2 (2); Phy- 
sics 9 (fall term (3) ) (1^); Economics or History (2). 

II. Electricity. 

freshman tear. 
(See Freshman Tear of Course I.) 

SOPHOMORE TEAR. 

English 2 (3); Mathematics 2 (3); Chemistry 1 (3); Chemistry 3 (2); 
Physics 1 (3); Drawing 1 (2). 

junior year. 

English 3 A (2); Mathematics 3 (3); Physics 4 (3); Chemistry 2 (8); 
Drawing 2 (2); Mathematics 4 (3) or Chemistry 4 (3). 



60 DEPARTMENT OF APPLIED SCIENCES 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Physics 6 (3); Physios 7 (4); Physics 8 and 9 (2); English 4 (8); Mathe- 
matics 7 (3) or Chemistry 7 (3) . 

III. Civil Engineering. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

(See Freshman Year of Coursel.) 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

English 2 (3); Mathematics 2 (3); Mathematics 3 (3); Chemistry 1 (3); 
Physics 1 (3); Drawing 1 (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

English 8 A (2) ; Mathematics 3B (2) ; Mathematics 4 (3) ; Geology 3 (3) ; 
Mathematics 7 (3); Drawing 2 (2). 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics 7 A (3); Mathematics 8 (3); Mathematics 10 (3j; English 
4 (3); Elective (3). 

IV. Mining and Metallurgy. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

(See Freshman Year of Course I.) 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
\ 

English 2 (3); Mathematics 2 (8); Chemistry 1 (8); Chemistry 8 (2); 
Geology 3 (2); Drawing 1 (2). 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

English 3 A (2); Mathematics 3 (3); Mathematics 4 (8); Chemistry 2 (8) ; 
Physics 1 (3); Geology 2 (2); Ore Deposits (24 lectures). 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 61 

SENIOR YEAR. 

English 4 (8); Mathematics 7 (3); Chemistry 4 (3); Physics 4 (8); Geol- 
ogy 4 (8); Drawing 2 (2); Mining (10 lectures). 

The courses of instruction are outlined on pages 29-47. 
Graduate Courses. 

Graduate courses leading to the degree of Master of Science (S.M.),may 
be pursued under conditions similar to those required for the degree of 
Master of Arts. See page 50. 



MEDALS AM) PHIZES. 



The Holt Medal in Mathematics. (Established in 1874.) A gold 
medal is offered by Mr. John Allen Holt and Mr. Martin H. Holt, the 
principals of Oak Ridge Institute, to that student who shall take the high- 
est rank in Mathematics 4. No student will be recommended for the 
medal unless he attain to grade 2. 

The Literary Essay Medal. (Established in 1890.) A gold medal is 
offered by Professor Thomas Hume to that member of the Senior Class who 
shall present the best essay or thesis on some distinctly literary subject. 

The Mangum Medal in Oratory. The Misses Mangum, late of 
Orange county, established in 1878 a gold medal in memory of their father, 
Willie Person Mangum. This medal is continued by his granddaughters, 
Mrs. Julian A. Turner, Mrs. Stephen B. Weeks, and Miss Preston Leach, 
and offered to that member of the Senior class who shall deliver the best 
oration at Commencement. 

The Bingham Prize in Debate. This prize is offered by Mr. R. W. 
Bingham, in memory of his great-grandfather, grand-father, father and 
brother. It is open to any student of the University and given annually 
for excellence in debate. The contestants are representatives of the Liter- 
ary Societies, and the contest is held on Tuesday evening of Commence- 
ment week. 

The Kerr Prize in Geology and Mineralogy. (Established in 
1889 by Mr. William H. Kerr in memory of his father, Professor Washing- 
ton Caruthers Kerr.) A prize of fifty dollars is offered to any undergrad- 
uate or graduate student, for the best thesis containing original work in 
the geology or mineralogy of North Carolina. 

The Greek Prize. (Established in 1887.) A prize of ten dollars is 
offered to that member of the Sophomore class who shall present the best 
rendering into English of selected passages of Greek not previously read. 



MEDALS AND PRIZES 63 

The Worth Prize in Philosophy. (Established in 1883.) Mr. 
Charles Williams Worth, in memory of his father, David Gaston Worth, 
of the class of 1853, will print the best thesis submitted by a student in 
Philosophy 4. 

The Early English Text Society Prize. A special prize is offered 
by the Early English Text Society, of London, for advanced work in 
Anglo-Saxon and Middle English. 

The Bryan Prize. A prize will be given annually for the best thesis 
in Political Science. This prize was established by Mr. William Jennings 
Bryan in 1903. 

The Hunter Lee Harris Memorial. (Established in 1903.) Dr. 
Charles Wyche, of St. Louis, offers in memory of Hunter Lee Harris, of 
the class of 1893, a gold medal for the best original story by any student of 
the University. 

The International Medal. This medal is offered by Mr. Hayne 
Davis, of the class of 1888, for the best essay on the following subject: — 
"The right relation of nations to each other under twentieth century con- 
ditions in the light of changes which have occurred throughout the world 
in the relation of political organisms, since the revolt of the American 
colonies." 

The Thomas Hume Prize. A prize of fifty dollars is offered by Mr. 
W. G. Peckham, of New York, for the best work in the Old English Bal- 
lads and Shakspere or Milton. 



PECUNIAKY AID AND EXPENSES. 



FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The Hill Fellowship. (Established in 1903, by Mr. John Sprunt 
Hill, of the class of 1889. ) The holder shall devote himself to the study 
of North Carolina History, at this University; but the fellowship is open 
to students of all the institutions for higher education in the State. 
Appointments are made by the Professor of History at the University of 
North Carolina, Professor John S. Bassett, during his connection with 
Trinity College, and the Founder or his representative. The work of the 
holder shall be under the direction of the same advisory board. 

This fellowship yields $200 annually. 

The Cameron Scholarships. (Established in 1892.) The heirs of 
Paul Carrington Cameron founded, in his memory, ten scholarships of the 
value of sixty dollars each. 

The Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies' Scholar- 
ships. (Established in 1893.) The Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary 
Societies of the University founded two scholarships of the value of sixty 
dollars each, recipients of which shall give assistance in the Library. 

The Moore Scholarships. (Established in 1881.) Bartholomew Fig- 
ures Moore, of Baleigh, bequeathed five thousand dollars, the interest of 
which shall be devoted to paying the tuition of students. 

The Mart Ann Smith Scholarships. (Established in 1891.) Miss 
Mary Ann Smith bequeathed thirty-seven thousand dollars for the foun- 
dation of scholarships, the number of scholarships to be determined by the 
amount of income. 

The Mary Rufpin Smith Scholarships. (Established in 1885.) Miss 
Mary Rnffin Smith bequeathed to the University, in memory of her 
brother, Dr. Francis Jones Smith, a valuable tract of land in Chatham 



FREE TUITION 65 

county, of fourteen hundred and sixty acres, known as Jones' Grove. The 
will provides that the rents of the land, or the interest on the purchase 
money, if sold, shall be used to pay the tuition of such poor students as 
the Faculty shall appoint." 

The Speight Scholarships. (Established in 1895.) The late Mrs. 
Mary Shepherd Speight bequeathed ten thousand dollars to the Univer- 
sity. The income shall be used to pay the tuition of needy students; but 
if tuition is ever made free, the income shall be used toward paying the 
salaries of the professors. 

The Wood Scholarship. (Established in 1892.) Mrs. Mary Sprunt 
Wood, of Wilmington, has founded in memory of her late husband, Dr. 
Thomas Fanning Wood, a scholarship of the value of sixty dollars. 

The Weil Scholarship. (Established in 1898.) A fund, established 
by Mr. Henry Weil, of Goldsboro, furnishes one scholarship of the value 
of sixty dollars. 

The Armfield Scholarships. (Established in 1901 and 1904.) These 
scholarships are established by the generosity of Mr. Eugene M. Armfield, 
of High Point, N. C, of the class of 1888. 

The Alumni Scholarships. These scholarships have been established 
by the gifts of the Alumni. A scholarship will be awarded for each one 
thousand dollars given. 

The Kenneth Murchison Scholarship. (Established in 1904.) This 
scholarship has been founded by Mrs. Jennie Murchison Carter, of Balti- 
more, in memory of her father. It is awarded by the founder. 

None of these scholarships are open to students in the professional 
departments of Law, Medicine, and Pharmacy. 

All applications for scholarships must be filed in the President's office on 
or before August 15, and must be in the regular form prescribed by the Uni- 
versity. Blank forms are supplied on application to the Registrar. 

FBEE TUITION. 

By an act of the Legislature in 1887, free tuition is given, in the Col- 
lege, to candidates for the ministry, to the sons of ministers, to young men 



66 PECUNIARY AID AND EXPENSES 

under bodily infirmity, to teachers and young men preparing to teach. 
This enables the University to aid most effectively the public school teachers 
of the State. 

LOAN FUNDS. 

The Deems Fund. (Established in 1879.) A fund of six hundred dol- 
lars was established by Rev. Dr. Charles F. Deems, late pastor of the Church 
of the Strangers, New York City, formerly a Professor in the University, 
in memory of his son, Lieutenant Theodore Disosway Deems. In 1881 the 
fund was greatly enlarged through the munificence of Mr. William H. 
Vanderbilt, by a gift of ten thousand dollars, "as an addition to the Deems 
Fund, to be loaned to indigent students of the University." 

Applications for loans will not be considered unless accompanied by tes- 
timonials from responsible persons as to poverty and merit. The funds 
are limited in amount and are loaned only on the security of two approved 
signatures and at the legal rate of interest. 

All applications for loans must be filed in the President's office on or 
before August 15. 

EXPENSES. 

Every effort is made to reduce to the lowest point the necessary expenses 
of an education at the University. The charges for each of the two terms 
are as follows: — 

Tuition fee $30.00 

Registration fee 5.00 

Medical and Infirmary fee .3.00 

Gymnasium fee 2.00 

Library fee 2.00 

Total 142.00 

The library fee is one dollar a term for members of the Dialectic and 
Philanthropic Literary Societies. Students taking courses- in the labora- 
tories are charged a small fee for materials. Every student must keep on 
deposit with the Bursar two dollars as security for damages. Willful 



DORMITORY ACCOMMODATIONS 67 

damage to! University property is charged to the perpetrator, if known, 
otnerwise it is assessed upon all students of the University. Any balance 
is returned to the student at the end of the year. 

Good board is furnished at Commons for eight dollars a month. A few 
students earn their board at Commons by waiting on the tables. In pri- 
vate clubs board may be reduced to a minimum of sis dollars a month. 
The entire annual expenses need not exceed three hundred dollars, and 
they may be reduced to two hundred dollars. 

From a number of itemized reports handed in by students, the following 
averages have been made. These give total expenses, exclusive of clothes 
and traveling. The average was taken in three classes. The first includes 
those who pay no tuition and wait at Commons, thus having no board to 
pay. The minimum expense account given under this heading was 157.00, 
the average $63.60. Secondly, the average expenses of those who pay 
board but no tuition, was $144.61. Lastly, the average expenses of those 
who pay both board and tuition was $265.25, the maximum being $500.00 

It is confidently believed that no institution offers wider opportunities 
of self-help to meritorious students of slender means. The desire is that 
no worthy boy, however poor, shall ever be turned away for lack of means. 
To such the University and town offer unusual opportunities for support. 
Many students are now working their way through college by every form 
of honorable labor. A number are here as the result of money earned or 
borrowed. Fifty are aided by loans, and over four hundred have received 
aid from the University in loans and scholarships in the past twenty years. 
A few students are selected by the authorities as waiters at Commons. 
Otherwise all opportunities available in the University and town must be 
secured by the personal effort of the individual, or with the assistance of 
the Faculty Committee on Self-Help. They are not assigned by the Pres- 
ident. 

DORMITORY ACCOMMODATIONS. 



The University buildings contain one hundred and seventy-four double 
rooms, available for the accommodation of students; none are furnished; 
there is no charge for service in addition to the rent. All rooms are fitted 



68 PECUNIARY AID AND EXPENSES 

with electric lights. Room-rent ranges from 75 cents to $2.75 per month 
for each occupant, the price depending on the location of the room. 

All the buildings of the University are heated by hot water according to 
the most improved methods. In the dormitories the charge for heating 
and light will be $2.00 per month for each room or one-half that sum for 
each occupant of a room. 



REGULATIONS REGARDING 
STUDENTS. 



REGISTRATION AND ASSIGNMENT OF BOOMS. 

All students are expected to present themselves for registration on Mon- 
day, Tuesday, or Wednesday, September 11, IS, or 13, 1905, and Tuesday, 
Wednesday, or Thursday, January 2, 3, or 4, 1906, between the hours of 9 
a. m. and 4 p. m., at the office of the Registrar. 

A student who presents himself for registration after the dates and times 
named shall pay a fee of two dollars in addition to the regular fee. 

Students desiring to retain their rooms in the College buildings must 
give formal notice to the Bursar before May 20th. Previous occupants of 
rooms, if not present to claim them at the times and places annually desig- 
nated for the assignment of rooms, will forfeit their rights to such rooms. 

According to the contract for rooms, it is provided that the occupants 
shall be responsible for all damage committed in or upon the room during 
their occupancy, as well as for damage committed by them upon any Uni- 
versity property; and that any malicious or wanton damage or any mali- 
cious or wanton or repeated disturbance of College order shall be a forfeit- 
ure of all right to dwell in a College building. The President reserves 
also the right to require any student whom for any reason he considers an 
undesirable tenant to vacate a room in the College buildings. 

The President may by official disapproval of any boarding-place in tbe 
village, require students to avoid such boarding- place. 

STANDING. 

Semi-annual reports of the standing of all students in all the studies of 



70 REGULATIONS REGARDING STUDENTS 

the previous term are sent to parents or guardians, based upon the follow- 
ing scale of marking: — 

Grade 1, 95-100 per cent. 

Grade 2, 90-95 per cent. 

Grade 3, 80-90 per cent. 

Grade 4, 70-80 per cent. 

Grade 5, 50-70 per cent. 

Grade 6, below 50 per cent. 

Students must attain a grade of at least 4 to pass in any study; those 
receiving grade 6 in any study must take such study over again with a 
class. 

In addition to the semi-annual reports, there are sent out during the ses- 
sion six monthly reports in which the standing of students is indicated in 
a general way. 

No student will be allowed to take less than 15, nor more than 18 hours 
of class room work per week without special permission of the Faculty or 
the President. 

Students desiring to change their courses must make written application 
to the President for the desired change. The application will be consid- 
ered by the President and the instructors in the departments concerned and 
will be granted only after a careful consideration of the facts in each case. 
No changes will be permitted after the first two weeks of the term except 
such as are granted after application to, and approval by the Faculty. 

A student who at the close of the period of special examinations in Sep- 
tember, is deficient by an amount equal to eight hours of class-room work 
for a year will be ranked with the next lower class. 

A student who has failed to pass all the examinations of the year in any 
College study may not take a higher class in that department, until he 
make good his deficiency. 

ABSENCES. 

In any term, absences are counted from the first regular meeting of each 
class. In no case will a student be considered present at any class unless 
he has been regularly registered as a member of that class. Students will 



SCHEDULE OF MONTHLY EXAMINATIONS 71 

be subject to the discipline of the Faculty when the total unexcused absen- 
ces in any month amount to five. 

Any student whose absences from a class during any month amount to 
as much as 25 per ceut. of the scheduled meetings of the class, is required 
to stand a special examination on that month's work, according to the 
schedule laid down below. 

In the case of those whose absences in a given month amount to 25 per 
cent , or more, of the scheduled meetings of the class, and who fail to stand 
the examination provided for such absences, it is left to the discretion of 
the instructor to retain them in the class. 

Students who are absent from a class during the months of December 
and May as much as 25 per cent, of the scheduled meetings of the class, 
must stand an examination for these months before being entitled to any 
grade on term examination. This special examination is to be held in 
connection with the regular term examination, or at some time during the 
examination period. 

Students who are absent during any term as much as 33% per cent, of 
the scheduled meetings of the class, except in case of prolonged sickness 
necessitating at least one half of the absences, may at the discretion 
of the instructor be debarred from standing the term examination. 

Schedule of Examinations to be Held Each Month for 
Excess of Absences. 

First Saturday in New Month. 

French and German, all classes and sections, 8:45 o'clock. 

Greek, 9:45 " 

Latin, . 11.00 " 

^oology and Botany, 12:00 " 

Second Saturday in New Month. 

Mathematics, all classes and sections, 8:45 " 

Geology, 10:00 " 

Chemistry, 11:00 " 

Physics, 13:00 " 



72 REGULATIONS REGARDING STUDENTS 

Third Saturday in Nev) Month. 

History and Economics, all classes and sections, 8:45 o'clock. 

English, 9:45 " 

Elementary Law, 11:00 " 

Philosophy, at night. 

Attendance at Chapel is compulsory for all students in the University 
except for members of the professional departments and for such others 
as are specially excused. Absence from Chapel will subject the student to 
discipline by the Executive. 

No student is allowed to absent himself from the University without 
written permission from the President or his representative. This permis- 
sion may, at the discretion of the executive officer, be granted only upon 
the formal request of the parent or guardian. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Each student, before being entitled to any grade upon an examination, 
is required to subscribe his name to the following pledge: "I hereby cer- 
tify that during this examination I have neither given nor received aid." 

Students who hand in papers at the regular examinations are considered 
to have relinquished any claim to special examinations for grades. Stu- 
dents who fail to attend regular examinations, or who fail to hand in 
papers, are regarded as handing in blank papers, unless they have been pre- 
viously excused from the examinations. 

Excuses from examinations are granted only in case of absolute neces- 
sity. Such an excuse, to be valid, must be obtained from the President on 
or before the day of the examination, and communicated officially on that 
day to the instructor holding the examination. 

A student wishing a special examination must deposit an application in 
the office of the Kegistrar at least one week before the beginning of the 
period of special examinations. 

A student who has been excused from an examination or has received 
grade 5, may have opportunity to make good his deficiency, without tak- 
ing the study over again, at the following times: 

(a) At the next succeeding regular examination period.. 



EXAMINATIONS 73 

(6) At the period of special examinations in September preceding the 
regular work of the session. 

(c) At the regular examination of the same class a year from the time 
when the deficiency was incurred. 

(d) If the deficiency be in a Junior or Senior study, either at one of the 
above-mentioned times, or at a special examination to be held in each 
study at the time scheduled for the first monthly special examination in 
that study after the opening of the term in January of the Senior year. 

A student having a deficiency in a Freshman study not made up by the 
close of the period of special examinations in September preceding his 
Junior year, and a student having a deficiency in a Sophomore study not 
made up by the close of the period of special examinations preceding his 
Senior year, shall be required to take such study over again with the class 
or, in the case of an elective study, to take another one in its place. 

The last opportunity to make up deficiencies occurring later than the 
beginning of the Junior year is at the special examination period men- 
tioned above (in d), except that Seniors failing to pass an examination in 
May may have one special examination during the examination period in 
May. 

Only those who have been excused from the regular examination may 
take another for a grade. All others take it merely to pass. 

The order of examinations for the removal of conditions in September, 
1905, will be: 

Monday, September 11. 

10 A. M. Physics. . 2:30 P. M. Chemistry. 

Tuesday, September IS. ■ 

10 A. M. Greek. 2:30 P. M. History and 

Economics. 
Wednesday, September 13. 

10 A. M. English. 2:30 P. M. Zoology and Botany. 

Thursday, September 14. 
10 A.M. German and French. 2:30 P.M. Mathematics. 

Friday, September 15. 
10 A. M. Latin. 2.30 P. M. Geology. 

Saturday, September 16. 
10 A. M. Philosophy. 2:30 P. M. 



74 REGULATIONS REGARDING STUDENTS 

ATHLETIC AND OTHER ORGANIZATIONS. 

No student will be allowed to take part in athletic contests, concerts, 
debates, etc., entailing absence from the University, whose parent or 
guardian objects to such participation. 

A student who was in attendance upon the University during a previous 
term or session must have passed satisfactory examinations upon at least 
six hours of work before he will be allowed to represent the University in 
an athletic contest or in any other public capacity. 

No student reported as deficient in a majority, of his classes can partici- 
pate in any athletic contest or otherwise publicly represent the University, 
until the deficiency is made good. 

No team or club will be allowed to be absent from the University for 
more than five lecture days during the term. 

The manager of each athletic team or musical club shall submit to the 
President a schedule of all engagements before positive arrangements are 
made. 

No student shall be eligible for membership in an athletic team playing 
in intercollegiate contests, unless he has registered on or before October 12. 

No student who has received, or is receiving now, or has been promised 
directly or indirectly any money or compensation in lieu of money for ath- 
letic services, shall be eligible as a player upon any athletic team represent- 
ing the University, and each candidate for such position must sign a 
statement to the effect that he is not ineligible tinder this rule. 

FRATERNITIES. 

Academic students may join fraternities after registration in their Soph- 
omore year. Fraternity men are not allowed to pledge Freshmen to join 
fraternities. 

GRADUATION. 

Each Senior will be officially informed by the Registrar in September of 
all deficiencies standing against him. These deficiencies must be made up 
by the^close of the special examination period in February. 



CONDUCT 75 

Every member of the Senior Class is required to write a thesis or an 
oration, for graduation. Those electing theses must announce their sub- 
jects by Feb. 1st to the Dean of the Faculty, who will report them to the 
Professors in the departments concerned. On May 2d the theses shall be 
read before the Professors, subject to criticism and correction. The cor- 
rected and approved theses must be handed to the Registrar in type- written 
form on or before May 15th. 

The number of orations is limited to four. The candidates must be 
members of the academic department, and must announce their subjects 
to the Dean of the Faculty by Feb. 1st. The orations shall be delivered 
in private before a committee of the Faculty on May 1st, who shall decide 
the relative merits of the orations. The four successful candidates are 
known as the Commencement Orators of the Senior Class. 

Candidates for more than one degree shall not offer the same elective in 
two courses, nor a required study in one course as an elective in another . 

CERTIFICATES. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed, in any depart- 
ment, all work required for a degree together with other elective work in 
the same department. (See under the several departments of instruction.) 

CONDUCT. 

By order of the Board of Trustees the Faculty is directed to dismiss from 
the University any student who is known to engage in drinking intoxica- 
ting liquors, gambling, hazing in any form, or to be guilty of dissolute 
conduct. 

Students persistently neglectful of duty, or addicted to boisterous con- 
duct or rowdyism, may be requested to leave the University. 



SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS. 





8:45 


9:45 


10:40 


11:35 


12:80 


2:30 


Mon. 


F 
Eng. 1. 1, II 
English 5 
English 15 
French 4 
Geology 1 
German 2 
Greek 3 
Greek 7 
Latin 10 
Math. 2, 1 
Math. 3 
Math. 5 


G 
Economics '! 
English 2, 1 
English 7 
English 13 
French 3 
Geology 4 
Greek A 
Greek 9 
Latin 2, II 
Latin 4, 9 
Math. 7 
Philosophy 1 
Phys., Blem. 


C 

Chemistry fi 
English 1,111 
English 4 
French 1, III 
German 6 
Greek 1, II 
Latin 1, 1 
Latin 2, 1 
Physics 1 
Physics 7 
Zoology 1 


D 

Chemistry 1 
Econom. 3, 4 
English 9 
French 1,1 
German 3 
History 1, II 
History 5 
Math. 1, IV 
Math. 3A 
Math. 9 
Pedagogy 6 


K 

Botany 1 
English 3 
English 3A 
Expression 2 
Greek 1, 1 
History 6 
Latin 1, II 
Math. 1, III 
Pedagogy 5 
Physics 5 


Laboratory: 
Chem. 1, 1 
Chemistry 4 
Chemistry 8 
Chemistry 9 
Physics 1, 1 
Physics 4 
Zoology 2 


TUES. 


A 

Chemistry 7 
Econom. 5, 6 
English 2, II 
English 14 
Geology 3 
German 1, 1 
Greek 6 
Latin 1, III 
Math. 1, 1, II 
Math. 4 
Pedagogy 3,4 
Physics 6 
Physics 9 
Italian 1 


B 

Chemistry 2 
English 1, IV 
English 6 
English 16 
French 1, II 
French 2 
Geology 
Greek 2 
History 1, 1 
Law, Elem. 
Math. 6, 8 
Philosophy 4 


C 

Chemistry 6 
English 1, III 
French 1, III 
German 6 
Graphics 
Greek 1, II 
History 2, 4 
Latin 1, 1 
Latin 2, 1 
Physics 1 
Physics 7 
Zoology 1 


H 

Botany 2 
English 11 
Expression 1 
Greek 5, 10 
History 10 
Latin 3 
Latin 7, 8 
Math. 1,IV 
Math. 14 
Philosophy 3 
Physios 4 


E 
Architec. 
Chemistry 5 
English 8 
German 1 , II 
Greek 1, 1 
History 7 
Latin 1, II 
Math. 1, IH 
Math. 2, II 
Pedagogy 1,2 
Philosophy 2 


Laboratory : 
Botany 1, 1 
Chem. 1, II 
Chemistry 5 
Chemistry 8 
Drawing 1 
Geology 2 
Physics 1, II 


Wed. 


A 
Chemistry 9 
English 2, II 
Geology 3 
German 1, 1 
Latin 1,111 
Math. 1, 1, II 
Math. 4 
Pedagogy 3, 4 
Physics 6 
Italian 1 


G 

English 2, 1 
English 7 
English 13 
French 3 
Geology 4 
Greek A 
Greek 9 
Latin 2, II 
Latin 4, 9 
Math. 7 
Philosophy 1 
Phys., Elem. 


K 

Botany 1 
English 3 
English3A 
Expression 2 
Greek 1, II 
History 6 
Latin 1,1 
Pedagogy 5 
Physics 5 


D 

Chemistry 1 
Econom. 3, 4 
English 12 
French 1, 1 
German 3 
Greek 4 
History 1,11 
History 5 
Latin 5, 6 
Math. 1, IV 
Math. 3A 
Math. 9 
Pedagogy 


Economics 1 
Eng 1.1,11 
English 5 
English 15 
French 4 
Geology 1 
German 2 
Greek 7 
Math. 2, 1 
Math. 3 
Math. 5 
Phys cs 2, 3 


Laboratory : 
Botany 1. II 
Chem. 1, III 
Chemistry 3 
Chemistry 4 
Chemistry 8 
Drawing 2, 3 


Thtjr. 


A 

Chemistry 7 
Econom. 5, 6 
English 2, II 
English 14 
Geology 3 
German 1, 1 
Greek 6 
Latin 1,111 
Math. 1, I, II 
Math. 4 
Pedagogy 3,4 
Physics 6 
Physics 9 
Italian 1 


B 

Chemistry 2 
English 1, IV 
English 6 
English 16 
French 1 , II 
French 2 
Geology 6 
Greek 2 
History 1, 1 
Law, Elem. 
Math. 6, 8 
Philosophy 4 


C 

English 1,111 
English 4 
French 1, III 
German 6 
Graphics 
Greek 1, II 
History 2, 4 
Latin 1, 1 
Latin 2, 1 
Physics 1 
Physics 7 


G 

Economics 2 
English 2, 1 
French 3 
Geology 4 
Greek A 
Latin 2, II 
Math. 7 
Philosophy 1 
Phys., Elem. 


E 
Architec. 
Chemistry 5 
English 8 
German 1, II 
Greek 1, 1 
History 7 
Latin 1, II 
Math. 1, III 
Math. 2, H 
Pedagogy 1,2 


Laboratory : 
Botany 2 
Chem. 1, IV 
Chemistry 8 
Chemistry 9 
Drawing I 
Geology 2 
Zoology 1, 1 
Zoology 2 


FBI. 


H 

English 11 
Expression 1 
Greek 5, 10 
History 10 
Latin 1,111 
Latin 7, 8 
Math. 1, 1, II 
Math. 14 
Philosophy 3 
Physics 4 


B 

Chemistry 2 
English 1, IV 
English 6 
French 1 , H 
French 2 
Geology C 
Greek 2 
History 1, 1 
Law, Elem. 
Math. 6, 8 
Philosophy 4 


F 
Economics 1 
Eng. 1,1,11 
English 5 
French 4 
Geology 1 
German 2 
Greek 7 
Latin 10 
Math. 2, 1 
Math. 3 
Math. 5 
Physics 2, 3 


D 

Chemistry 1 
English 9 
English 12 
French 1, 1 
German 3 ■ 
Greek 4 
History 1, II 
History 5 
Latin 5, 6 
Math. 1, IV 
Math. 3A 
Math. 9 


E 
German 1 , II 
Greek 1, 1 
History 7 
Latin 1, II 
Math. 1, III 
Math. 2, II 
Pedagogy 1,2 
Philosophy 2 


Laboratory : 
Botany 2 
Chem. 1, V 
Chemistry 3 
Chemistry 4 
Chemistry 8 
Physics 7 
Zoology 1, II 
Zoology 2 


Sat. 


Botany 3 
Chemistry 5 
Chemistry 7 
Geology 6 
Zoolgy 8 


Botany 3 
Drawing 2, 3 
Zoology 3 


Botany 3 
Chemistry 5 
Zoology 3 


Botany 3 
Zoology 3 


Botany 8 
Zoology 3 





SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS 



77 



SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS, 1905-06. 



First Dat 


Second Dat 


Third Dat 


Fourth Dat 


Fifth Dat 


Botany 2 


Chemistry 7 


Economics 1 


Architec. 


Botany 1 


English 11 


Chemistry 9 


English 1 


Chemistry 5 


English 3 


Expression 1 


Econom 5, 6 


English 6 


English 8 


English 3 A 


Greek 5, 10 


English 2 


English 15 


German 1 


Expression 2 


History 10 


Geology 3 


French 4 


Greek 1 


History 6 


Latin 3 


German 1 


Geology 1 


History 7 


Pedagogy 5 


Latin 7, 8 


Greek 6 


German 2 


Math. 1 


Physics 5 


Math 14 


History 3 


Greek 7 


Math. 2 




Philosophy 3 


Latin 1 


Latin 10 


Pedagogy 1, 2 




Physics 4 


Math. 1 
Math. 4 
Pedagogy 3, 4 
Physics 6 
Physics 9 
Italian i 


Math. 2 
Math. 3 
Math. 5 


Philosophy 2 





Sixth Dat 


Seventh Dat 


Eighth Dat 


Ninth Dat 


Tenth Dat 


Chemistry 1 


English 2 


Chemistry 2 


Chemistry 6 


Economics 2 


Economics 3, 4 


English 14 


English 6 


English 1 


English 7 


English 9 


Greek 3 


English 16 


English 4 


English 13 


English 12 


Latin 1 


French 1 


German 6 


French 3 


French 1 


Physics 2, 3 


French 2 


Graphics 


Geology 4 


German 3 




Geology 6 


Greek 1 


Greek 9 


Greek 4 




Greek 2 


History 2, 4 


Latin 2 


History 1 




History 1 


Latin 2 


Latin 4, 9 


History 5 




Law, Elem. 


Physics 1 


Math. 7 


Latin 5, 6 




Math. 6, 8 


Physics 7 


Philosophy 1 


Math. 3A 
Math. 9 
Pedagogy 6 




Philosophy 4 


Zoology 1 


Physics, Elem. 











THE LAW DEPAKTMENT. 



FACULTY. 



FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLE, Ph.D.,D.Sc, LL.D., President. 
JAMES CAMERON MacRAE, LL.D., Dean and Professor of Common 

and Statute Law and Equity. 
LUCIUS POLK McGEHEE, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law and Equity. 
KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE, LL.D., Professor of Constitutional History 

and International Law. 
CHARLES LEE RAPER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics and 

of History. 
CHARLES STAPLES MANGUM, A.B., M.D., Lecturer on Medico-Legal 

Jurisprudence. 
JAMES C. MacRAE, Jr., LL.B., Instructor in Law. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The Law Department provides three courses of study, each extending 
over a period of one college year, in addition to the elementary course 
named below. Instruction is given by means of lectures, text-books, the 
study of leading cases, and moot courts. Special lectures are given by 
resident instructors and by members of the bar upon subjects of interest to 
students. 
Mr. MacRae. 
1 . Elementary course in first principles and plain rules of business, con- 
tract, and property law. Robinson's Elementary Law. Spencer's 
Commercial Law. Three hours. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors in the College. This course affords 
a preliminary study for those intending to continue the study of 
law and also an opportunity to learn principles and forms applica- 
ble to commercial and other business life. 



COURSES OP INSTRUCTION 79 

Professor McGehee. 

2. (a) Studies in the English Constitution (Oreasey). First Blackstone 

(Bwell's Essentials). Manning's Commentaries. Domestic Rela- 
tions, including the law of Master and Servant, and the law of 
Negligence. Real' Property Law: Second Blackstone and Wil- 
liams; Code chapters on cognate subjects; North Carolina cases 
and other cases. Criminal Law: Fourth Blackstone; Clark on 
Criminal Law; Code chapters on Crimes and Punishment and 
Criminal Procedure. Five hours {fall term) 
(6) Bigelow on Torts. Lawson on Bailments and Carriers. Clark 
on Contracts. The Commercial Instrument Law. The Law of 
Agency and Partnership. Forms and Conveyancing. Five hours 
(spring term). 

Professor MacRae. 

3. (a) First Greenleaf on Evidence; Best on Evidence (Third Ewell); the 

Code chapter on Evidence. Bispham's Equity; Equity Pleading 
and Practice. Code of Civil Procedure; Code Practice. Five 
hours (fall term), 
(b) Clark on Corporations; the North Carolina Corporation Law and 
cases. Schouler on Executors and Administrators; Code chap- 
ters on Executors, Widows, Wills, and Testaments; Descent and 
Distribution. The Law of Wills. The Constitutions of North 
Carolina and of the United States. The Code. Five hours (spring 
term) . 

4. (a) Dillon on Municipal Corporations. Richards on Insurance. Hughes 

on Admiralty. The Law of Bankruptcy. Five hours (fall term). 

(b) Oooley on Constitutional Limitations. Historical Jurisprudence. 

International Law. Lectures. Theses. Five hours (spring term) . 

Professor Battle. 

5. Constitutional History and International Law. (History 7) . A general 

survey of the history and principles of the constitutions of the lead- 
ing nations, ancient and modern. A special study of the Consti- 
tution of the United States, With the principal judicial decisions 
thereon. Also lectures on the leading principles of International 
Law. Three hours. 



80 THE LAW DEPARTMENT 

Associate Professor Raper. 

6. Economics. (Economics 1). A general study of the production and 

consumption of wealth. A special study of land, labor, capital, 
and organization as factors in the production of wealth. Mar- 
shall's Principles of Economics; lectures and readings. Two hours. 

7. Economics. (Economics 2). Public Finance. A general study of 

the principles of public expenditures and revenues, and of the 
relation of the State to industries. A special study of taxation 
and the tariff . Adams' Science of Finance; lectures and readings. 
Two hours. 

Professor BIangum. 
3. Medico-legal Jurisprudence. One hour. 

CERTIFICATES. 

A certificate is granted to students who pass with credit thorough writ- 
ten examinations on all subjects embraced in courses 2 and 3. Those who 
receive this certificate are considered prepared to appear before the Su- 
preme Court for examination. 

SPECIAL LECTURES. 

From time to time during the term, lectures will be delivered before the 
school by eminent judges and lawyers. 

THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LAWS. 

The degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) is conferred by the University 
upon candidates who have completed courses 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 or 7, and have 
passed all examinations. Two years of residence are ordinarily required 
of all students who desire to offer themselves as candidates for the degree. 
Every candidate must submit a thesis on some subject approved by the 



EXPENSES 81 

Dean of the Department. Applicants for the degree of Bachelor of Laws 
must be at least twenty years of age, and must have completed an aca- 
demic course equivalent to that of the Freshman and Sophomore years in 
the College. 

MOOT COURT. 

The Moot Court is an important factor in legal educational methods; it 
familiarizes the student with the practical side of law. It is the purpose 
of the University Court to acquaint the student with the legal details so 
necessary to be acquired, yet so difficult of access. Regular sessions are 
held every Saturday evening, and every student in the Law Department 
has frequent opportunities for practice. The work is thorough and is car- 
ried on from the inception of the suit to the final judgment in the Ap- 
pellate Court. 

Court of Appeals. 

Judge, Professor MacRae. 

Superior Court. 

Judge, Edward Holden Farriss. 

Solicitor, Ernest Linwood Sawyer. 

Clerk, Forest Marion Redd. 

Sheriff, James Edward Barry. 

EXPENSES PER TERM. 

Tuition fee $37.50 

Registration and Incidental fees 10.00 

Tuition fee for Elementary Course 5.00 
Where full tuition, |37.50, is paid, there is no extra charge for the Ele- 
mentary Course. 



THE LAW DEPARTMENT 



Good board is furnished at Commons Hall for $8 per month. The rent 
of unfurnished rooms in the dormitories ranges from seventy -five cents to 
$2.75 per month, for each occupant. For each room a charge of $2.00 per 
month is made for electric light and for heating. 



ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION. 

Candidates for admission into the Law School should present themselves 
on the same days and at the same hours with candidates for admission into 
the College, either in September or in January. Candidates for admission 
and students already members of the school are expected to register ac- 
cording to the regulations on page 69. The session of the Law Depart- 
ment is of the same length as the College year. The members of the Law 
Department enjoy all the privileges extended to other students in the 
University. 

SUMMER LAW SCHOOL. 

During the summer two classes in law are conducted by the professors 
of this department. The text-books used are the same as those required in 
courses 2 and 3, prescribed by the Supreme Court. The summer session 
begins on the seventh day of June, 1905, and ends on the Friday before the 
last Monday in August. The fee for admission into either course is thirty 
dollars for tuition and three dollars for registration; for admission into 
both courses, fifty dollars for tuition and three dollars for registration. 
The tuition is thirty dollars for both courses to students who have attended 
the regular session for two terms and to licensed attorneys desiring to 
review the principles of the Law. 

All fees are payable in advance. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 



FACULTY AT CHAPEL HILL. 

FRANCIS PRESTON VBNABLB, Ph.D., D.Sc, LL.D., President, 

Pro' nor of Theoretical Chtmistry. 

RICHARD HENRY WHITEHEAD, A.B., M.D., Dean of the Depart- 
ment at Chapel Hill and Professor of Anatomy and Pathology. 

CHARLES STAPLES MANGUM, A.B., M.D., Professor of Materia Med- 
ica and Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

ISAAC HALL MANNING, M.D., Professor of Physiology and Bacteri- 
ology. 

JOSHUA WALKER GORE, C.E., Professor of Physics. 

HENRY Van PETERS WILSON, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

ALVIN SAWYER WHEELER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Organic 
Chemist 1 ) y. 

WILLIAM CHAMBERS COKER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

JAMES EDWARD LATTA, A.M., Associate Professor of Physics. 

JAMES EDWARD MILLS, Ph.D., Associate. Professor of Chemistry. 

GUSTAVUS CHAMBERS CRAWFORD, A.M., Associate Professor of 
Physics. 

ROY ALL OSCAR EUGENE DAVIS, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 

HARRY MURRAY JONES, A.B., Assistant in Anatomy. 

WILBUR CALHOUN RICE, Assistant in Anatomy. 

ALBERT WHITEHEAD LATTA, Ph.B., Assistant in Physics. 

WILLIAMS McKIM MARRIOTT, Assistant in Chemistry. 

WADE HAMPTON OLDHAM, Assistant in Chemistry. 

EDGAR EUGENE RANDOLPH, A.B., Assistant in Chemistry. 

WILLIAM GRAY AMICK, Assistant in Zoology. 

WILLIAM HERBERT KIBLER, Assistant in Zoology. 



84 THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 



FACULTY AT RALEIGH. 



HUBERT ASHLEY ROYSTER, A.B., M.D., Dean of the Department at 

Raleigh and Professor of Gynecology. 
WISCONSIN ILLINOIS ROYSTER, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 
AUGUSTUS WASHINGTON KNOX, M.D., Professor of Surgery. 
RICHARD HENRY LEWIS, A.B., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the 

Eye a)id of General Hygiene. 
KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE, Jr., A.B., M.D., Professor of Diseases of 

the Ear, Nose, and Throat. 
ANDREW WATSON GOODWIN, M.D., Professor of Diseases of the 

Skin, and of the Genito-urinary System. 
HENRY McKEE TUCKER, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics. 
JAMES WILLIAM McGEE, Jr., M.D., Lecturer on Therapeutics and on 

Diseases of Children. 
ROBERT SHERWOOD McGEACHY, M.D., Chief of Dispensary and 

Lecturer on Anaesthetics. 
WILLIAM DeBERNIERE MacNIDER, M.D., Demonstrator of Clinical 

Pathology and of Diagnosis. 
JAMES McKEE, M.D., Clinical Prof essor of Mental and Nervous Diseases. 
LEONE BURNS NEWELL, A.B., Assistant Demonstrator of Clinical 

Pathology. 

FOUNDATION. 

Instruction in Medicine is given in two distinct schools, one situated at 
the seat of the University, Chapel Hill, and the other in the city of Raleigh. 

The Department at Chapel Hill furnishes instruction in the fundamental 
branches of Medicine — those studies which constitute the scientific basis 
of medicine and surgery, and which compose the first two years of the 
medical curriculum. This Department was founded in 1890. In 1898 it 
was admitted to membership in the Association of American Medical Col- 
leges; in 1901 it was incorporated as an integral part of the University on 
the same footing as the graduate and other professional departments. 

Owing to the absence of clinical facilities at Chapel Hill, instruction in 



GENERAL PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 85 

the third and fourth years of the medical curriculum is conducted by the 
Department at Raleigh This Department was opened in the fall of 1902. 
It enjoys the hospital and other clinical advantages to be found in a city. 
Its course is limited to the curriculum of the third and fourth years. 



THE DEPARTMENT AT CHAPEL HILL. 

THE GENERAL, PLAN OF INSTRUCTION. 

The course of instruction provided by the Department at Chapel Hill 
extends over a period of two college years, and its successful completion 
entitles students to entrance into the third year of high-grade medical col- 
leges. 

In the arrangement of the courses of study the attempt is made to fol- 
low what would seem to be their natural sequence. In the first year the 
student devotes most of his time to anatomical and chemical studies. The 
studies of Gross and Microscopic Anatomy proceed side by side. In the 
spring, by which time the student has obtained sufficient knowledge of 
Chemistry and Anatomy, the study of Physiology is begun. 

In the second year the study of Anatomy and Physiology is continued. 
The work in Chemistry is done in the laboratory and is devoted to Quali- 
tative Analysis, Physiological Chemistry, and Toxicology, and continues 
throughout the year. Pathology is taken up at the beginning of this year, 
and continued for nine months. Materia Medica is begun in the spring 
term, after the course in Physiology has been completed. In this year 
also the class practices exercises in Minor Surgery. 

It is still necessary to continue courses in Physics and General Chem- 
istry for the benefit of those students who have not had the advantage of 
adequate instruction in those subjects. Students who have had courses in 
Physics and General Chemistry should elect General Zoology and Embry- 
ology during the first and second year respectively. 

The Department possesses exceptional advantages for its work. It has 
an adequate corps of trained instructors and good laboratories for the 
various branches of study; the classes are small, so that the methods of 
instruction required by modern educational ideals are carried on with com- 



86 THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

parative ease, and each student has the opportunity of seeing the various 
demonstrations and experiments, receiving direct personal instruction; the 
students live in the environment of a University, and enjoy all the advan- 
tages it offers to young men; moreover, all the laboratories of the aca- 
demic department as well as the courses in Physics, Chemistry, and Biol- 
ogy are open to medical students. 

The majority of the work in most of the branches is carried on in the 
laboratories. Lectures are not neglected and the value of good text-books 
is appreciated; but it is considered especially desirable that the student 
should be brought face to face with nature, so that he will not be satisfied 
with the mere acquisition of facts, but will have his powers of observation 
and judgment, so essential to the physician, stimulated and cultivated. 

the cttrkjctji/um:. 

The course is arranged in two sessions of nine months each, as follows: 

First Year. 

Physics. Two hours a week. 

General Chemistry. Three lecture hours a week; two hours, laboratory. 

Histology. Five hours a week. 

Anatomy. Five hours a week until November; fourteen hours a week 
during November, December, January, and February. 

Physiology. Three hours a week during January and February; five 
hours a week during March, April, and May. 

Second Year. 

Chemistry. Six hours a week until February. 

Anatomy. Five hours a week until November; twelve hours a week 
during November, December, January, and February. 

Bacteriology. Six hours a week, fall term. 

Physiology. Three lecture hours and six laboratory hours a week, fall 
term; three hours a week during January and February. 

Pathology. Four hours a week during January and February; eight 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 87 

hours a week during March, April, and May. 
Materia Medica. Five hours a week, spring term. 
Minor Surgery. Three hours a week for six weeks, fall term. 
Physiological Chemistry. Six hours a week from February to June. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

Chemistry. 

Professor Venable and Dr. Davis. 

1. General Descriptive Chemistry. The elements are studied in a syste- 
matic manner. The laws governing their combination and the 
compounds resulting, are considered with appropriate reference to 
their occurence and relationships to medicine. The latter part of 
the course is taken up with organic chemistry. 

Dr. Davis, Messrs. Marriott and Randolph. 
9. Qualitative Analysis and Toxicology. Laboratory work with lectures. 
The behavior of the elements and their compounds is studied in 
the laboratory. Practice is given in the analysis of known and 
unknown mixtures with especial reference to the detection of 
poisons and determination of the purity of drugs. 

Text: Venable and Wheeler's Qualitative Chemical Analysis and the 

professor's notes. 
This course supplements the lectures given by Professor Mangum on 

Toxicology. 

Physics. 

Associate Professor Crawford. 

Elementary Physics. The fundamental facts of Physics are studied with 
some special attention to heat and electricity. Text-book, lectures 
and experiments. 
Text: Carhart and Chute. 



Zoology. 
Professor Wilson. 

1. General Zoology. 

An introductory course giving an outline of the classification and 
structure of animals, with consideration of the fundamentals of 



88 THE DEPAKTMENT OP MEDICINE 

histology, embryology, and physiology, and some consideration of 
biological theories. Lectures with laboratory work. 

Text: Morgan. 

Elective in the first year. 

2. Vertebrate Histology. 

The principal tissues and organs of the vertebrate body are here 
studied according to the methods of modern microscopy. The 
individual student is instructed how to make, study, and sketch 
microscopic preparations, including paraffin and celloidin sections, 
macerations, and mounts of fresh tissue. 

Texts: Schaefer; Stoehr. 

Required in the first year. 

3. Vertebrate Embryology. 

The main facts in the development of a vertebrate animal are here 
worked out by the student for himself with the aid of explanatory 
lectures. A brief survey of the early stages of development, 
including maturation, fertilization, segmentation, and formation of 
the germ layers is first made upon lower forms (nematode, star- 
fish, teleost, frog). The development of the typical vertebrate 
organs is then studied in chick embryos. Elective in second year. 



Botany. 

Associate Professor Ooker. 

1. General Botany. 

An introduction to the structure and classification of plants. Lec- 
tures with laboratory work. 
Elective in the first year. 

Anatomy. 

Professors Whitehead and Mangum, Messrs. Jones and Rice. 

The method of instruction is one of dissection and demonstration 
rather than of lectures. In the first year the body is studied by 
systems, first the bones, then the muscles, etc. The student does 
much of the dissecting for himself, but the more difficult dissec- 
tions are made by the instructor. Frequent practical examina- 
tions are held, upon which stress is laid, in order to enforce proper 
study of the cadaver. In the second year the study proceeds by 
regions. The student does all the dissecting, but is still under the 
supervision of»an instructor, who examines him^upon tha work 
done, and indicates the bearing of anatomical facts upon surgical 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 89 

operations. During this year there is a special laboratory study 
of the anatomy of the central nervous system. 
Text: Gray or Morris; Whitehead's Anatomy of the Brain. 

Physiology. 

Professor Manning. 

The study of physiology is begun in the spring term of the first 

year, during which the physiology of digestion, the digestive 

glands, blopd, respiration, metabolism, excretion, and animal heat 

/J 
is considered in lectures illustrated by experiments. The study is 

continued in the fall term of the second year by the consideration 
c of the physiology of the muscles and of the nervous system. Dur- 
ing this term also the student learns the methods of experimental 
physiology by means of class work in the laboratory. 

Physiological Chemistry is taught as a part of the course in physi- 
ology by means of lectures and laboratory work, in which will be 
studied the chemistry of the proximate principles, digestion includ- 
ing examination of the digestive juices, the blood, milk, urine nor- 
mal and pathological, and foods. 

Texts: The American Text-booh; Stewart; Simon's Physiological 
Chemistry. 

Materia Medica and Pharmacology. 

Professor Mangum. 

This course is devoted to the study of the origin and constitution of 
remedial measures, their preparation and doses, and in particular 
their physiological action and the indications for their rational 
use. Opportunity will be given to students to familiarize them- 
selves with the more important crude drugs and their prepara- 
tions. Instruction is given by means of lectures, recitations, and 
demonstrations. The lectures which accompany the work in Tox- 
icology are given as a part of the course in Materia Medica, 
Text: Stevens, or Hare, or Willcox and White, 



90 THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Pathology. 

Professor Manning and Mr. Jones. 

1. Bacteriology. The student learns by practical experience the methods 

of cultivating, staining, and identifying the principal bacteria, the 
pathological significance of which is explained by lectures and 
demonstrated by inoculation of animals. In this way the chief 
bacteria are studied in pure culture, after which the methods of 
obtaining pure cultures from mixtures of bacteria are learned. 
The necessary manipulations are all carried on by the student, who 
thus obtains a useful practical knowledge of the subject. 
Text: Muir and Ritchie. 

Professor Whitehead and Mr. Jones. 

2. Pathological Histology. In this course the various morbid processes 

which affect the tissues are discussed in lectures and studied with 
the microscope. The laboratory is well supplied with pathologi- 
cal material, and each student stains, mounts, and studies a large 
number of sections extending over almost the whole range of 
pathology, upon which he is required to stand a practical exami- 
nation. 
Text: Green. 

Minor Surgery. 

Professor Mangum. 

The class practices the application of bandages, and learns the mod- 
ern methods of dressing wounds. 
Text: Davis on Bandaging. 

ENTRANCE REatTIREMENTS. 

Students desiring to matriculate will be required, except under the cir- 
cumstances noted hereafter, to pass the following entrance examinations: 

1. In English, a composition on some subject of general interest, which 
must be written by the applicant at the time of the examination, and must 
contain at least two hundred words. 



EXPENSES 91 

2. In Arithmetic, such questions as will show a thorough knowledge of 
common and decimal fractions, compound numbers, ratio and proportion. 

3. In Algebra, questions covering the fundamental operations, factor- 
ing, and simple quadratic equations. 

4. In Latin, an examination upon such elementary work as the student 
may offer, showing a familiarity usually attained by one year of study. 

In place of this examination or any part of it, the official certificates of 
high schools will be accepted. 

Students who are unable to pass the above entrance examinations, may 
matriculate provided they are not deficient in more than one subject. The 
deficiencies must be made up before entering the second year. For such 
deficient students instruction will be provided without additional tuition 
fees. 

PRIZES AND SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The Harris Prize. (Established in 1895.) Mrs. T. W. Harris offers, 
in honor of the late Dr. T. W. Harris, a pocket case of instruments to that 
student who shall make the best grade in Anatomy. 

The Wood Scholarship. (Established in 1895.) Mrs. Mary Sprunt 
Wood, of Wilmington, has founded, in memory of her husband, the late 
Dr. Thomas Fanning Wood, a scholarship of the value of ninety dollars. 



EXPENSES. 

The following are the charges per term payable at the beginning of each 
term in September and January respectively: 

Tuition $37.50. 

Registration $10 .00. 

In addition, first-year students pay a laboratory fee in histology of $5 
per term; and in chemistry of $1,25 per term. Second-year students pay 
a laboratory fee in chemistry of $5.00. 

Good board is furnished at Commons Hall for $8.00 a month. The rent 
of unfurnished rooms in the dormitories ranges from seventy-five cents to 
$2.75 per month, for each occupant. For each room a charge of $2.00 per 
month is made for electric light and for heat, 



92 THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION. 

Candidates for admission and students already members of the school 
should present themselves to the President for registration on Monday, 
Tuesday, orWednesday, September 11, IS, or IS, 1905, and Tuesday, Wednes- 
day, or Thursday, January 2, 3, or 4, 1906. 

The session of the Medical School is of the same length as the college 
year, beginning September 11, 1905, and ending June 6, 1906. 

All members of the Medical School enjoy the same privileges accorded 
to other students in the University. 

THE DEPARTMENT AT RALEIGH. 

LOCATION AND FACILITIES. 

The advantages afforded by the city of Raleigh for the advanced work 
of the University Medical Department are numerous. It is the most acces- 
sible of the State's larger cities and has already become one of its educa- 
tional centres. Comprising, with the suburbs, a population of 25,000, 
it offers clinical facilities second to none in North Carolina. Two hospit- 
als admit students of medicine for instruction. These hospitals are 
attended by the Faculty of the Medical Department and special care is 
given to individual teaching with the varied material found in them. 
Besides these hospitals, there are many available public institutions which 
furnish valuable privileges to students of the University. 

THE CURRICULUM. 

The course is arranged for two sessions of nine months each, known as 
the third and fourth years, as follows: 



Third Year. 



Medicine. Four hours a week. 
Surgery. Four hours a week, 



■THE CURRICULUM 93 

Obstetrics. Three hours a week. 
Physical Diagnosis. Three hours a week. 
Hygiene. One hour a week (fall term). 
Clinical Pathology. Five hours a week. 
Therapeutics. One hour a week. 

Fourth Year. 

Medicine. Four hours a week. 

Surgery. Four hours a week. 

Gynecology. Two hours a week. 

Pediatrics. Two hours a week. 

Clinical Pathology. Three hours a week. 

Diseases of the Eye. Two hours a week. 

Diseases of the Bar, Nose, and Throat. Two hours a week. 

Diseases of the Skin and Genito-urinary System. One hour a week. 

Nervous and Mental Diseases. One hour a week (spring term). 

Dispensary. Six hours a week. 

These include the weekly clinics and ward classes, by means of 
which students receive thorough, individual, practical instruction. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

Medicine. 

Professor W. I. Royster and Dr. MacNider. 

This subject is taught by didactic lectures, ward classes and general 
clinics. Cases are assigned to students and examinations are held 
upon their work. History-writing receives due attention. 

In the third year are treated the infectious diseases, diseases of the 
blood and the digestive system. 

Individual instruction is given in the methods of physical diagnosis. 

In the fourth year are studied the diseases of the respiratory sys- 
tem, heart, and kidneys, and the general diseases. There are- 
weekly clinics and ward classes. 

Texts: Osier, Tyson. 



94 THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Surgery. 

Professor Knox and Dr. McGeachy. 

In the third year are treated the principles of surgery, wounds, min- 
or operations, and bandaging. Ward classes and dispensary 
work furnish ample demonstrations of the subjects described in 
the lectures. 

The fourth year is devoted to the general practice of surgery and 
the major operations. A special course in anaesthetics is given 
to each student. At all the clinics students will be able, by per- 
sonal observations at short range, to witness every step of an oper- 
ation and thus familiarize themselves with the details. 

Text: Wyeth. 

Obstetrics. 
Professor Tucker. 

Lectures, recitations, and clinical experience. Fundamental obstet- 
ric principles receive the closest attention . A number of maternity 
cases are available for instructing students in the management of 
labor and the lying-in period. Each student must have attended 
the prescribed number of labors before he is entitled to a diploma. 
Text: Hirst. 

Gynecology. 
Professor H. A. Royster. 

Lectures covering the entire field of diseases of women from the 
simplest procedure to the more serious operations. Illustrative 
clinics are held weekly. In many cases students are allowed to 
assist in the operations. Practice in pelvic examinations is given 
constantly to each student, for the purpose of enabling him to 
make correct gynecological diagnoses. An abundance of material 
is always available. 
Text: Penrose. 

Therapeutics. 
Dr. McGee 

The whole subject is thoroughly discussed by means of recitations 

and demonstrations, with constant drill on important drugs. 
Text: Hare. 



THE CURRICULUM 95 

Diseases of the Eye. 
Professor Lewis. 

This course is conducted by means of lectures with clinics and dis- 
pensary classes, and furnishes what is absolutely essential for the 
general practitioner. Mastery of the principles is insisted upon. 
An abundance of illustrative material is presented in clinics and 
dispensary classes. 
Text: May. 

Diseases of the Ear, Nose, and Throat. 

Professor Battle. 

Lectures and demonstrations with opportunities for investigating 
cases under direct supervision. A knowledge of these diseases is 
recognized as necessary for every physician. Particular care is 
devoted to personal demonstration. 

Text: Bishop. 

Diseases of Children. 
Dr. McGee. 

Lectures and bed-side demonstrations. Special emphasis is given to 
the diagnosis and treatment of the infectious diseases and to the 
care of infants. A large number of dispensary cases are seen. 
Text: Holt. 

Clinical Pathology and Diagnosis. 

Dr. MacNider and Mr. Newell. 

Great stress is laid upon the association of laboratory technique with 
cases actually under observation. Examinations of blood, urine, 
sputum, pus, tumors, etc., are made by the student with the assist- 
ance of the demonstrators. The equipment is excellent. 

Text: Simon. 

General Hygiene. 
Professor Lewis. 

The principles and laws of hygiene and sanitation and the most ap- 



86 THE DEPAKTMENT OP MEDICINE 

proved practical methods established by modern science. A 
knowledge of hygiene and sanitation is very necessary for physi- 
cians in every community. Extraordinary opportunities will be 
given for investigating the workings of the State sanitary laws. 
Text: Bergey. 

Nervous and Mental Diseases. 

Clinical Professor McKee. 

Practical instruction is given in the principles of the subject from 
material furnished by one of the State's largest insane hospitals. 

Diseases of the Skin and Genito-urinary System. 

Professor Goodwin. 

Instruction is given by means of lectures, recitations, and dispensary 

work. Attention to correct diagnosis is insisted upon. Modern 

methods are carefully studied. 
Texts: Stel wag-on, Chatwood. 

THE CITY FREE DISPENSARY. 

Dr. McGeachy, Physician in Chief. 

By special arrangement, the city of Raleigh has allowed the establish- 
ment of a Free Dispensary, to which all the outdoor city patients come for 
treatment. Thus every possible case is utilized as clinical material for 
students of medicine. Here will be found unusual privileges of personal 
observation. At certain times each student may conduct the dispensary 
work on his own account under the direction of the instructors. 

DEGREE. 

The degree of Doctor of Medicine will be conferred by the Board of 
Trustees upon students who are recommended for graduation by the Fac- 



REGISTRATION 97 

alty. Candidates must have devoted at least four full years to the study 
of medicine and the fourth year, at least, must have been spent in this 
schoo}, the other three in this or other recognized schools of medicine. 
Candidates nrust have passed satisfactory examinations in all subjects 
required for the degree. - 

EXPENSES. 

The following are the charges per term, payable at the beginning of each 
term: — 

Tuition $37.50 

At graduation a charge of $5.00 is made for the diploma. Board may be 
obtained in the city at prices ranging from $12 50 to $15 per month. 

ADMISSION. 

Students will be admitted to the Medical Department at Raleigh upon 
completion of the preparatory two years' course at Chapel Hill, or its 
equivalent. Preliminary examinations will be required, if deemed neces- 
sary. 

Students may be admitted to advanced standing who present evidence of 
having fulfilled the requirements of this department with respect to pre- 
liminary education, and of having completed at accredited medical schools 
the courses required in the preceding years. 

REGISTRATION. 

Students should present themselves for registration on Monday, Tuesday, 
or Wednesday, September 11, 12, ox 13, 1905, and on Tuesday, Wednesday, or 
Thursday, January 2, 3, or 4, 1906. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 



FACULTY. 



FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLE, Ph.D., D.Sa.LL.D , President and 

Professor of Theoretical Chemistry . 
EDWARD VERNON HOWELL, A.B., Ph.G., Dean and Professor of 

Pharmacy. 
JOSHUA WALKER GORE, O. E., Professor of Physics. 
HENRY Van PETERS WILSON, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 
CHARLES STAPLES MANGUM, A.B., M.D., Professor of Materia Med- 

ica. 
ISAAC HALL MANNING, M.D., Professor of Physiology. 
ALVIN SAWYER WHEELER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Organic 

Chemistry. 
WILLIAM CHAMBERS COKER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 
JAMES EDWARD LATTA, A.M., Associate Professor of Physics. 
JAMES EDWARD MILLS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
GUSTAVUS CHAMBERS CRAWFORD, A.M., Associate Professor of 

Physics. 
ROY ALL OSCAR EUGENE DAVIS, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 
CLARENCE FLAGLER, Assistant in Pharmaceutical Laboratory. 
WILLIAMS McKIM MARRIOTT, Assistant in Cliemistry. 
WADE HAMPTON OLDHAM, Assistant in Chemistry. 
EDGAR EUGENE RANDOLPH, A.B., Assistant in Chemistry. 
WILLIAM GRAY AMIOK, Assistant in Zoology. 
WILLIAM HERBERT KIBLER, Assistant in Zoology. 
ROBERT FREDERICK LEINBACH, Assistant in Zoology. 
HARRY ARDELL ALLARD, Assistant in Botany. 



ARRANGEMENT OF COURSES 99 

FOUNDATION. 

The Department of Pharmacy was established in 1897 and was opened 
for students in September of that year. Its location at the seat of the Uni- 
versity assures to its students the most modern scientific instruction with 
all the laboratory facilities of the academic department, as well as the 
courses of instruction in allied branches. These opportunities will meet 
the requirements of the large number of students who were compelled 
heretofore to obtain their pharmaceutical education in other States. Briefly 
stated, the advantages are as follows: 

1. Thorough, careful, individual instruction. 

2. The practical experience derived from active work in the labor- 
atories . 

3. Intimate association with the other departments of the Univer- 
ity, to all of which the student of pharmacy has access, and the daily 
contact with students pursuing various branches of learning. 

4. The use of the large library and reading room and the well equipped 
gymnasium. 

5. The comparatively small cost at which a two-years' course may be 
obtained. 

6. The length of the course, which consists of two sessions of nine 
months each, — nearly a fourth longer than in many of the Colleges of 
Pharmacy. 

The success of the students of this Department in their examinations 
before State Boards has been very gratifying. Students of this Depart- 
ment have been applicants before the State Boards of Maryland, Pennsyl- 
vania and North Carolina. None of the graduates of this Department 
applying for license before State Boards have failed to pass the examina- 
tions. 

ARRANGEMENT OF COURSES. 

The courses are arranged for two sessions of nine months each, and lead 
to the degree of Graduate of Pharmacy (Ph.G.). 



100 THE DEPARTMENT OP PHARMACY 

First Year. 

Theory and Practice of Pharmacy, Practical Course in Operative Phar- 
macy, Elementary Physics, Descriptive Chemistry, Physiology, (optional), 
Lectures on Pharmaceutical Botany. 

Second Year. 

Theory and Practice of Pharmacy, Practical Course in Operative Phar- 
macy, General Zoology, (optional), Botany, (optional), Materia Medica, 
Pharmacology, and Toxicology, Qualitative Analysis, Urinary Analysis. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

Pharmacy. 

Professor Howell. 

1. Theory and Practice of Pharmacy. First year. Five hour*. 

This course consists of lectures upon the following subjects, with 
practical demonstration and the employment of proper apparatus 
whenever necessary: 

Metrology, comminution, heat, evaporation, distillation, sublima- 
tion. 

Fusion, calcination, granulation, oxidation, reduction, etc. 

Solution of solids, liquids and gases; deliquesence, effloresence, etc. 

Colation, filtration, decolorization, clarification, precipitation, etc. 

Maceration, expression, infusion, decoction, etc. 

Percolation, and the preparation and study of the following: waters, 
syrups, honeys, glycerites, mucilages, mixtures, spirits, elixirs, 
liniments, collodions, tinctures, wines, vinegars, and fluid extracts. 

Text: Remington, Theory and Practice of Pharmacy. 

2. Theory and Practice of Pharmacy. Second year. Five hours. 

The official forms and preparations of drugs are taken up in detail. 
Beginning with the inorganic compounds, the salts are considered 
with regard to their commercial qualities and pharmaceutical uses 
and preparations. The organic compounds are studied, commenc- 
ing with the salts of the organic acids and passing to the natural 
and organic compounds. 

3. Lectures on Pharmaceutical Botany. Two hours (spring term). 

This course is preparatory to the study of Materia Medica, and takes 
up the study of the flower, the various topics of fruits, seeds, etc., 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 101 

and a careful study of the descriptive terms as applied to leaves, 
stems and roots. Instruction is giveu in the gathering and proper 
mounting of specimens of the various official herbs that grow in 
this vicinity. 



Materia Medica, Pharmacology, and Toxicology. 

Professor Howell. 

1 . Materia Medica. Lectures on the geographical and botanical sources 

of drugs; descriptions and uses of the same, together with their 

official preparations and doses. Three hours {fall term). 

Opportunity is given to the student to familiarize himself with most 
of the crude drugs and their preparations. 

Text: White and Wilcox. 

Professor Mangum. 

2. Materia Medica and Pharmacology. This course is devoted to the 
study of the origin and constitution of remedial measures, their 
preparations and doses; and in particular, their physiological 
action and the indications for their rational use. Opportunity 
will be given to students to familiarize themselves with the more 
important crude drugs and their preparations. Instruction is 
given by means of lectures, recitations, and demonstrations. The 
lectures intended to accompany the work in Toxicology are given 
as a part of the course in Materia Medica. 

Physics. 

Associate Professor Crawford. 

Elementary Physics. The fundamental facts of Physics are studied with 
some special attention to heat and electricity. Text-book, lectures, 
and experiments. Two hours. 

Chemistry. 

Professor Venable and Dr. Davis. 
1. General Descriptive Chemistry. The elements are studied in a syste- 
matic manner. The laws governing their combination, and the 



102 THE DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY 

compounds resulting, are considered with appropriate reference to 

their occurrence and relationships to medicine. The latter part of 

the course is taken up with organic chemistry. First year, three 

hours, lectures, and two hours, laboratory. 

Texts: Venable and Howe's Inorganic Chemistry According to the 
Periodic Law, and Remsen's Organic Chemistry , supplemented by 
lectures and quizzes. 

Dr. Davis, Messrs. Marriott and Randolph. 

9. Qualitative Analysis and Toxicology. Laboratory work with lectures. 

The behavior of the elements and their compounds is studied in 
the laboratory. Practice is given in the analysis of known and 
unknown mixtures with especial reference to the detection of 
poisons and determination of the purity of drugs. Second year 
(September to February), three hours. 

Text: Venable and Wheeler's Qualitative Chemical Analysis and the 

professor's notes. 
This course supplements the lectures given by Professor Mangum on 

Toxicology. 

Associate Professor Wheeler. 

10. Physiological Chemistry including Urinary Analysis. Lectures and 

laboratory work. The latter includes examination of bones, blood, 

gastric and intestinal juices, bile, milk, urine, and foods. Second 

year (February to June), three hours. 

Text: Halliburton's Chemical Physiology and Jackson's Laboratory 
Methods in Physiological Chemistry. 

The following courses are not required of students in Pharmacy but may 
be elected profitably: 

Physiology. 

Professor Manning. 

The study of physiology is begun in the spring term of the first 
year, during which the physiology of digestion, the digestive 
glands, blood, respiration, metabolism, excretion, and animal heat 
is considered in lectures illustrated by experiments. The study is 
continued in the fall term of the second year by the consideration 
of^the physiology of the muscles and of the nervous system. 



OPTIONAL COURSES 103 

During this term also the student learns the methods of experi- 
mental physiology by means of class work in the laboratory. 
Three hours (each term). 
Texts: American Text-hook, Stewart, or Kirke. 

Zoology. 

Professor Wilson. 

1. General Zoology. Three hours. 

An introductory course giving an outline of the classification and 
structure of animals, with consideration of the fundamentals of 
histology, embryology, and physiology, and some consideration of 
biological theories. Lectures with laboratory work. 

Text: Morgan. 

Botany. 

Associate Professor Coker. 

9. General introduction to Systematic Botany, with special attention to 
medical plants. Laboratory and field work with recitations. 
Three hours {spring term). 
Open to students of Pharmacy only. 

Prescription Filling. 

Professor Howell. 

In order that students may gain experience in presciption filling, a course 
in the practical every day work of a drug store and in selling poi- 
sons and filling prescriptions is given. The prescriptions selected 
are those that will give the largest amount of practical experience. 
For this course a fee of ten dollars is required, to cover the cost 
of ingredients, bottles, labels, etc. 



OPTIONAL COURSES. 

The following optional courses may be taken on the payment of a small 
laboratory fee to cover cost of materials, etc. 



104 THE DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY 

Industrial Chemistry. Lectures. The application of chemistry to the 

arts and industries. Three hours. 

This course includes metallurgy, glass making, pottery, (fall term); 
food, clothing, building materials, explosives, photography, etc., 

(spring term}. 

Agricultural Chemistry. Lectures. Three hours (spring term). 

This course includes the chemistry of the plant and the soil, and the 
discussion of plant food, etc. Many specimens have been col- 
lected in the Industrial Museum to illustrate this course and the 
preceding one. 

Quantitative Analysis and Assaying. Laboratory work. Three hours. 

This course is intended to give the student a thorough grounding in 
analytical methods and manipulations . 

Quantitative Analysis. Laboratory work. Five hours. 

The student in this course is led further into the study and practice 
of analytical methods. The work may take any special direction 
desired by him, fitting him to be an agricultural chemist, iron 
chemist, manufacturing chemist, physician, druggist, or teacher 
of chemistry. Encouragement, is given to the student to make 
original researches. 

Determinative Mineralogy. Lectures with laboratory work. Dana's 

Text-book of Mineralogy. Two hours. 

Bacteriology. Six hours (fall term). 

The student learns by practical experience the methods of cultivat- 
ing, staining, and identifying the principal bacteria, and their 
pathological significance is explained by lectures and demonstra- 
tions by inoculation of animals. In this way the chief pathogenic 
bacteria are studied in pure culture on the various media, after 
which the methods of obtaining pure culture from mixtures of 
bacteria are learned. The necessary manipulations are carried out 
by the students, who thus obtain a practical knowledge of the 
subject which can be gained in no other way. 

Students in Pharmacy have also the privilege of attending any of 
the regular academic courses. 



EXAMINATIONS. 

Final examinations are held at the end of each term on the subjects 
embraced in the course. 

An average of 70 per cent, on the intermediate and final examinations is 
required to pass in the various branches. 



OTHER LABORATORIES 105 

QUIZZES. 

Quizzes upon the different branches are regularly held. Specimen quiz- 
zes upon Materia Medica, Chemistry, and Pharmacy are held once a week, 
and consist in the recognition and correct writing of the official name of 
the specimen presented. 

Students are required to make an average of 70 per cent, on the examin- 
ations given on specimens at the close of each term. 

THE PHARMACEUTICAL LABORATORY. 

Officers. 

Edward Vernon Howell, A.B., Ph.G., Director and Professor of Phar- 
macy. 
Clarence Flagler, Assistant in the Pharmaceutical Laboratory. 

The rooms of the Pharmaceutical Laboratory are admirably adapted to 
this purpose. They are conveniently situated on the first floor, are well 
lighted and well equipped with water, electric lights, and gas. To each 
student is assigned a desk, provided with lock and key, and containing all 
the apparatus necessary for the every day work of a pharmacist. In the 
store room is kept a supply of materials for practical work, as well as the 
apparatus for the more complex operations. Ample space is provided for 
work at the prescription counter, where practical instruction in the com- 
pounding and dispensing of prescriptions is given. 

A small deposit fee is required to cover the cost of breakage of apparatus. 
At the end of the session this fee will be returned, less the amount of 
breakage. 

OTHER LABORATORIES. 

The laboratories of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology are open to students 
in Pharmacy. These laboratories are all equipped with the most improved 
apparatus for experimentation and illustration of lectures. 



106 THE DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY 

READING ROOM AND LIBRARY. 

The Pharmaceutical Department is provided with a well selected library 
and with a reading room, inaugurated by the class of 1897, in which are 
filed a large number of medical and pharmaceutical journals. 

In addition to these advantages, students of this department enjoy the 
privileges of the University reading room, in which are filed all the lead- 
ing newspapers and magazines, and free access to the University Library, 
which numbers forty-two thousand volumes and twenty thousand pam- 
phlets. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION. 

Every person upon whom the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy of this 
University shall be conferred, must have completed the work of both years 
in the Department of Pharmacy of this University, or one course (that of 
the second year) here after one in some recognized college of Pharmacy. 
He must obtain satisfactory marking in attendance and make a general 
average of 70 per cent, in the various branches, and submit a satisfactory 
thesis. 

He must also have had a practical experience of at least four years with 
some qualified pharmacist or pharmacists in a dispensing store. Satisfac- 
tory evidence on this point must be submitted to the head of the Depart- 
ment. 

Students who have not had the full four years' experience will be per- 
mitted to stand examinations for graduation; but their diplomas will be 
withheld until they shall have satisfied tnis requirement. 

THESES. 

The thesis must be an original essay embodying the results of the stu- 
dent's personal research in some branch of pharmacy, which he has prose- 
cuted under the direction of the professor who has assigned him the 
subject. The thesis will be published at the discretion of the professor. 



EXPENSES 107 

The thesis, together with certificate of time of practical experience, must 
be deposited with the Registrar on or before May 1 . 

PHIZES. 

The Bradham Prize, offered by Mr. C. D. Bradham, of Newbern, N. C, 
will be given to the student making the highest general average during 
the two years of study. 

The Gilpin Langdon Prize, offered by Messrs. Gilpin Langdon & Co., of 
Baltimore, Md., will be given to the student making the best line of prep- 
arations in the pharmaceutical laboratory. 

Prizes will also be given : 

1 . For the best thesis. 

2. For the best collection of native medicinal herbs. 

3. For the best exhibit of chemical salts made by a second year student. 

4. For the best work in the recognition of materia medica specimens. 

5. To the student recognizing the largest number of pharmaceutical 
preparations. 

EXPENSES. 

The charges of each term are payable at the beginning of the term. 
They are as follows: 

Tuition .' 130.00 

Registration and incidental fees. . 10.00 

For chemistry 1 there is a fee of $1.25; for Chemistry 9 and 10, a fee of 
$5.00. In the Prescription course there is a fee of $10.00. 

The students of Pharmacy are entitled to the use of the gymnasium, the 
library and reading room, and, in case of sickness, to medical attention 
and the use of the infirmary. , 

Good board is furnished at Commons Hall for $8.00 per month. The 
rent of unfurnished rooms ranges from 75 cents to $2.75 per month. For 
each room is made a charge of $2.00 per month for electric light and 
heating. 



108 THE DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY 

ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION. 

Candidates for admission into the Department of Pharmacy should pre- 
sent themselves on the same days and at the same hours with candidates 
for admission into the College. For the next academic year, these days 
will be ilonday, Tuesday, or Wednesday, September 11, IS, or 18, 1905, and 
Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday, January 2, 3, or 4, 1906. The session 
of the Department of Pharmacy is of the same length as the College year, 
beginning September 11, 1905, and ending June 6, 1906. 

The members of the Department of Pharmacy enjoy all the privileges 
extended to other students in the University. 



STUDENTS (1904-1905). 



Gkaduates. 



Name. Tear. Residence. 

Askew, Edward Stephenson, First, Windsor. 

A.B., 1899. Economics, English. 

Bernard, William Stanly, Fourth, Greenville. 

A.M., 1904. Greek, Latin, English. Candidate for Ph.D. 

Carmichael, William Donald, Jr., First, Durham. 

Ph.B., 1897. 

Connor, Robert Diggs Wimberly, Second, Wilmington. 

Ph.B., 1899. History, Latin, English. Candidate tor A.M. 

Crowell, George Henry, Third, High Point. 

Ph.B., 1892. History, English, Latin. Candidate for A.M. 

Curtis, Nathaniel Cortlandt, First, Chapel Hill. 

Ph.B., 1900; B.S., Columbia, 1904. English, Mathematics. 
Daniels, Virgil Clayton, First, Oriental. 

Ph.B., 1904. Chemistry, English, Philosophy. Candidate for A.M. 

Faires, Rosabelle Simonton, Second, Statesville. 

English. 
Harding, Henry Patrick, Second, Newbern. 

A.B., 1899. Pedagogy, History, English, Latin. Candidate for A.M. 

Irwin, James Preston, First, Charlotte. 

B S., 1904. Chemistry. 

Jacocks, William Pioard, First, Windsor. 

A.B., 1904. History, Pedagogy, French. Candidate for A.M. 
Jones, Harry Murray, First, Franklin. 

A.B., 1903. Chemistry, Biology, Physiology, English. Candidate for A. M 

Latta, Albert Whitehead, First, Raleigh. 

Ph.B , 1904. Physics, Mathematics. Candidate for A.M. 
McCanless, Walter Frederick, First, Trinity. 

Ph.B., 1904. English, Pedagogy, German, History. Candidate for A.M. 
McKie, George McFarland, Third, Chapel Hill. 

Graduate Emerson School of Oratory. Philosophy, German, French. 

Mann, Wade Hampton, First, Saxapahaw. 

A.B., 1904. 
Marriott, Williams McKim, First, Chapel Hill. 

B.S.,1904 Chemistry, Physics. Candidate for S.M. 



110 



STUDENTS 



Miller, Claude Lee, First, Shelby. 

Ph.B,1900. Chemistry. 
Oldham, Wade Hampton, First, Moore. 

Chemistry, Geology. Candidate for A.M. 

Pelton, Mabell Shippie Clarke, First, Arden. 

A B., 1887, Boston University. English, French. 

Perry, Rex William, First, Pendleton, S. O. 

Chemistry, Mathematics, Geology. Candidate for A.M. 

Plyler, Marion Timothy, Second, Chapel Hill. 

A.B., Trinity College, 1892. English, Philosophy, History. Candidate for A.M. 

Randolph, Edgar Eugene, First, Charlotte. 

A. B., 1904. History, English, Economics, Philosophy. Candidate for A.M. 

Sifford, Ernest, First, Charlotte. 

Ph.B., 1904. Chemistry. 

Stacy, Marvin Hendrix, Second, Morven. 

Ph.B., 1902; A.M., 1904. Mathematics. 
Strowd, Thomas Wilson," First, Chapel Hill. 

Underbill, Wingate, First, Kinston. 

A.B., 1897. 
Vanghan, John Henry, First, Siloam. 

Ph.B., 1904. History, English, Philosophy, Economics, German. Candidate 
for A.M. 

Whitehead, Albert Carlton, First, Eastman, Ga. 

A.B„ Ga. A. & M. College. Mathematics, Physics, French. Candidate for A.M. 

Whitehurst, Harold, Second, Newbern. 

A.B., 1903. Greek, Latin, English. Candidate for A.M. 

Wilson, Henry Evan Davis, Second, Norfolk, Va. 

Ph.B., 1900. English, History, Latin. Candidate for A.M. 
Wilson, Louis Round, Sixth. Chapel Hill. 

A B., 1899, A.M., 1902. English, German. Candidate for Ph.D. 

Wright, Isaac Clark, First, Coharie. 

Wright, Robert Herring, First, Baltimore, Md. 

B S., 1897. 

34 





Senior Class. 




Allard, Harry Ardell, 




Sci., 


Oxford, Mass. 


Amick, William Gray, 




Phil., 


Liberty. 


Barnhardt, Charles Carroll, 




Phil., 


Whitsett. 


Boone, Samuel Bell, 




Arts, 


Jackson. 


Brigman, Lindo, 




Arts, 


Rockingham. 


Brower, James Frederick, 


V 


Phil., 


Winston-Salem 


Carr, Claiborn MacDowell, 

t 




Arts, 


Durham. 



SBNIC 


IR CLASS 


111 


Cathey, William Oecil, 


Phil, 


Charlotte. 


Cole, Worth, 


Phil, 


Charlotte. 


Cole, Walter Francis, B.S. Clemson, 


'02, Arts, 


Rockingham. 


Cox, Francis Augustus, 


Arts, 


Penelo. 


Cox, John Robert, 


Phil, 


Fremont. 


Davis, Henry Wiley, 


. Sci., 


Salisbury. 


Emerson, Horace Mann, Jr., 


Sci., 


Wilmington. 


Gudger, Hubert Barnard, 


Phil, 


Asheville. 


Harris, Julia Hamlet, 


Arts, 


Raleigh. 


Haywood, Hubert Benbury, 


Phil, 


Raleigh. 


Hendley, Charles James, 


Arts, 


Elmwood. 


Higdon, Thomas Bragg, . 


Arts, 


Higdonville. 


Hines, Julian Colegate, Jr., 


Sci., 


Morven. 


Howard, Jasper Victor, 


Arts, 


Kiuston. 


Jones, Hamilton McRary, 


Arts, 


Warrenton. 


Jordan, Strowd, 


Arts, 


Caldwell Institute 


Kelly, Laughlin McLeod, 


Sci., 


Carthage. 


King, Albert Hill, ' 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Lassiter, Benjamin Kittrell, 


Phil, 


Oxford. 


Lassiter, Robert Gilliam, 


Sci., 


Oxford. 


Ledbetter, Penlie Briscoe, 


Phil, 


Davidson River. 


Lewis, Henry Stuart, c 


Sci., 


Jackson. 


Lewis, Roger Gregory, 


Arts, 


Littleton. 


McLean, Frank, 


Arts, 


Maxton. 


MacNider, George Mallett, 


Sci., 


Chapel Hill. 


Matthews, Leonard W. , 


Arts, 


Matthews. 


A.B., Presbyterian College 


ofS. C, 1902. 


• 


Miller, Charles Walter, 


Phil, 


Suther lands. 


Moore, Andrew Jackson, 


Phil, 


Greenville. 


Murphy, James Bumgardner, 


Sci., 


Morganton. 


Nixon, Kemp Battle, 


Sci., 


Lincolnton. 


Noble, Albert Morris, Jr., 


Phil, 


Selma. 


Noble, Robert Primrose, 


Phil, 


Selma. 


Oldham, Wade Hampton, 


Sci., 


Moore. 


Paddison, George Lucas, 


Arts, 


Burgaw. 


Perrett, Walter Kenneth, 


Phil, 


Whitsett. 


Perry, Rex William, 


Arts, 


Pendleton, S. 0. 



112 



STUDENTS 



Philips, Henry Hyman, Sci., 

Robertson, Judge Buxton, Phil., 

Rogers, Paul Hamilton, Phil., 

Ross, Otlio Bescent, Arts, 

Rountree, Louis Gustavus, Arts, 

Shore, William Thomas. Sci., 

Singletary, George Currie, Arts, 

Sitton, Charles Vedder, Sci., 

Sloan, Charles Henry, Phil., 

Tabor, George Leroy, Sci.. 

Townsend, Newman Alexander, Phil., 

Tyson, John Joyner, Sci., 

Walters, Charles Manly, Arts, 

ph.b., Elon College, 1904. 

Whitaker, George Thomas, Arts, 

a.b., Elon College, 1904. 



Tarboro. 

Hartshorn. 

Society Hill, S. C. 

Charlotte. 

Brooklyn, N. T. 

Charlotte. 

Clarkton. 

Pendleton. 

Belmont. 

Chapel Hill. 

Raynham. 

Greenville. 

Burlington. 

Letha. 



Wilson, John Kenyon, 




Arts, 


Elizabeth City. 


Worth, Henry Venable, 




Sci., 


Asheboro. 


Wrenn, Clement, 




Phil., 


Mount Airy. 


Wright, Isaac Clarke, 




Arts, 


Coharie. 


Wade, James Lloyd, 




Phil., 


Dunn. 




Junior Class. 




Attmore, George Sittgreaves, 


Jr., 


Arts, 


Stonewall. 


Bagby, Charles Whitfield, 




Arts, 


High Point. 


Bahnson, Agnew Hunter, 




Phil., 


Winston-Salem 


Brown, Roy Melton, 




Phil., 


Rutherwood. 


Buchanan, Corsey Candler, 




Sci., 


Sylva. 


Burwell, Edmond Strudwick, 




Phil., 


Charlotte. 


Burwood, George Norwood, 




Opt., 


Goldsboro. 


Calder, Robert Edward, 




Sci., 


Wilmington. 


Cheshire, Theophilus Parker, 




Arts, 


Tarboro. 


Clark, Jerome Bayard, 




Arts, 


Clarkton. 


Claytor, Numa Reid, 




Phil,, 


Durham. 


Crawford, Frederick Mull, 




Phil., 


Reidsville. 


Crump, Walter Moore, 




Sci., 


Salisbury. 


Dalton, Archie Carter, 




Phil., 


Greensboro. 



JONIOK 


CLASS 


1 


Drane, Franklin Parker, 


Phil, 


Eden ton. 


Duncan, James Shepard, 


Arts, 


Beaufort. 


Edmonson, Frank Alexander, 


Arts, 


Morgan ton. 


Emerson, Horace Mann, Jr., 


Sci., 


Wilmington. 


Farrow, Garrason Anglo, 


Arts, 


Newbern. 


Fletcher, Arthur Lloyd, 


Arts, 


Jefferson. 


Galloway, Thomas B. , 


Sci , 


Quebec. 


Gore, Walter Thomas, 


Arts, 


Wine li ester, Va. 


Goslen, Junius Blake, 


Phil, 


Winston Salem. 


Grimes, William Lawrence, 


Arts, 


Lexington. 


Haselden, William Rutherford, 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Hassell, Charles, 


Elect. Law, 


Williamston. 


Heide, Samuel Skinner, 


Sci., 


Wilmington. 


Henry, Ray, 


Arts, 


Lilesville. 


Hughes, Nicholas Collin, Jr., 


Arts, 


Chocowinity. 


Johnson, Annie Susan, 


Arts, 


Lumber Bridge. 


Jones, Hamilton Chamberlain, Jr., 


Arts, 


Charlotte. 


Kerr, James Stevens, 


Arts, 


Clinton. 


King, Isham, 


Arts, 


Sanford. 


Littleton, Henry Ward, 


Arts, 


Albemarle. 


Love, Walter Bennett, 


Arts, 


Monroe. 


Noble, Robert Primrose, 


Phil., 


Selnia. 


McCain, Hugh White, 


Arts, 


Waxii:iw. 


McDiarmid, Hecter McKinnon, 


Arts, 


Ri efonl. 


McLain, Robert Henry, 


Art , 


Concord. 


McNider, James Small, 


Phil., 


Chapanoke. 


Mann, William Henry Lee, 


Arts, 


Saxapahnw. 


Martin, Charles Wigg, 


Chew.., 


Portsmouth, Va. 


Miller, Thomas Grier, 


Arts, 


Statesville. ~ 


Mills, Quincy Sharpe, 


Arts, 


States ville. 


Moore, Louis Toomer, 


Arts, 


Wilmington. 


Nichols, Austin Flint, 


Arts, 


Roxboro. 


Parker, John Archibald, 


Phil., 


Duke. 


Perry, Bennett Hester, 


Phil., 


Henderson. 


Pogue, Joseph Ezekiel, Jr., 


Arts, 


Raleigh. 


Reynolds, Robert Rice, 


Sci., 


Asheville. 



113 



114 STUDEKlS 




Royal, Benjamin Franklin, 


Arts, 


Morehead City. 


Scott, Ruby Theodore, 


A rts, 


Morrisville. 


Seagle, Perry Edgar, 


Arts, 


Hendersonville. 


Stancell, Samuel Turner, 


Arts, 


Margarettesville, 


Staton, John Arthur, 


Arts, 


Bethel. 


Stephenson, Victor Lee, 


Arts, 


Statesville. 


Thomas, George Gillette, Jr., 


Sci., 


Wilmington. 


Upchurch, William Merriman, 


Phil, 


Morrisville. 


Washburn, Benjamin Earl, 


Phil, 


Rutherford ton. 


Weller, Frank Marshall, 


Arts, 


Weldou. 


Wiggins, John Carroll, 


Arts, 


Suffolk, Va. 


Wilson, William Miller, 


Phil., 


Rock Hill, S. C. 


Winborne, John Wallace, 


Arts, 


Tyner. 


Winston, Robert Alonzo, 


Opt., 


Franklinton. 


Wood, John Gilliam, Jr., 


Phil., 


Edenton. 


Yokley, James Fletcher, 


Phil., 


Monnt Airy. 
66' 


Sophomore Class. 


Abernethy, Benjamin Scott, 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Allen, Risden Tyler, 


Arts, 


Wadesboro. 


Archer, Mcllwain, 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Armstrong, Joseph Mortier, 


Sci., 


Wilmington. 


Aycock, Jesse Barden, 


Arts, 


Fremont. 


Barker, William Jefferson, 


Arts, 


Wooten. 


Benuett, Junius White, 


Elect. Law, 


Reidsville. 


Bond, William Marion, Jr., 


Sci., 


Edenton. 


Brinkley, Lonn Leland, 


Arts, 


Elm City. 


Brown, John Bass, 


Arts, 


Charlotte. 


Cannon, Clarence Victor, 


Arts, 


Ayden. 


Carson, Jesse Columbus, 


Phil., 


Bethel. 


Cole, Ernest Leach, 


Ails, 


Carbontou. 


Connor, Edwin Erwin, 


Arts, 


Mars Hill. 


Cox, Robert Forrest, 


Opt., 


Lowell. 


Cummiugs, Kemp Plummer Battle, 


Arts, 


Winston-Salem. 


Cummings, Michael Penn, 


Arts, 


Reidsville. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



115 



D'Alemberte, James Herron, 


Arts, 


Pensacola, Fla. 


Dalton, William Reid, 


Opt., 


Reidsville. 


Day, Ropy Councill, 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Denson, Eley Parker, 


Arts, 


High Point. 


Dickson, Thomas Wyatt,. 


Arts, 


Raeford. 


Dickson, William Samuel, 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Dixon, J. K., Jr., 


Arts, 


Gastonia. 


Douthit, Jacob Benton, 


Arts, 


Clemmons. 


Duls, William Henry, 


Arts, 


Wilmington. 


Farabee, Samuel Howard, 


Arts, 


Winston-Salem . 


Farmer, Clarence Ravenel, 


Arts, 


Elm City. 


Fenner, Harry Shaw, 


Arts, 


Halifax. 


Fry, Howell Lewis, Jr., 


Sci., 


Greensboro. 


Galloway, James Cleveland, 


Sci., 


Grimesland. 


Gillam, Frank, 


Arts, 


Windsor. 


Hall, Emmett Connor, 


Arts, 


Cap, Va. 


L.I. Peabody College, 1904, 




, 


Hannah, John George, Jr. , 


Elect. Law, 


Siler City. 


Hardin, Oscar Lawrence, 


Arts, 


Blowing Rock. 


Hardison, Robinson Battle, 


Arts, 


Morven. 


Hathcock, John Lindsay, 


Phil., 


Albemarle . 


Haynes, Joseph Walter, 


Arts, 


Asheville. 


Haywood, Thomas Holt, 


Phil., 


Haw River. 


Herring, Ernest Clyde, 


Phil., 


Garland. 


Hester, Francis Eugene, 


Arts, 


Raleigh. 


Hicks, Oscar Vernon, 


Arts, 


Goldsboro. 


Highsmith, Edwin McKoy, 


Phil., 


Harrell's Store. 
1 


Hill, Hampden, 


Arts, 


Goldsboro. 


Hill, Hubert, 


Sci., 


Raleigh. 


Houck, William Arthur, 


Arts, 


Statesville. 


Hoyle, Ambrose Hill, 


Phil., 


Cleveland Wills. 


Hughes, Israel Harding, 


Arts, 


Chocowinity. 


Hughes, Norman, 


Arts, 


Jackson. 


Hunter, William Shearer, 


Phil., 


Lexington. 


Hutchison, Andrew Cleveland, 


Opt., 


Charlotte. 


Hutchison, Francis, 


Arts, 


Charlotte. 



116 


STUDENTS 




James, James Burton, 


Phil, 


Greenville. 


Jeffress, Edwin Bedfor, 


Arts, 


South Boston, Va. 


Jenkins, "William Adrian, 


Arts, 


Colerain . 


Johnson, Bayard Cleveland, 


Arts, 


Ingold. 


Jones, Walter Raleigh, 


Arts, 


Pine Ridge. 


Katzenstein, Charles J., 


Arts, 


Warren Plains. 


Keel, Charles Herbert, 


Arts, 


Mount Olive. 


Kibler, William Herbert, 


Arts, 


Morgan ton. 


Knight, Henry Reginald, 


Sci. , 


Barnes Store. 


Lambertson, Browning Augusta, Arts, 


Rich Square. 


Leary, Ernest Woodard, 


Elect. Law, 


Edenton. 


Legrand, Eugene Quince, 


Sci., 


Wilmington. 


Linn, Stahle, 


Phil, 


Salisbury. 


London, Isaac Spencer, 


Arts, 


Pittsboro. 


Long, Edgar Miller, 


Elect. Med., 


Hamilton. 


Loughlin, Charles Clarke, 


Elect. Law, 


Wilmington. 


Lykes, John Wall, 


Phil, 


Tampa, Fla. 


Lyon, Otho Devanne, 


Opt., 


Hester. 


McAden, James Thomas, 


Arts, 


Raleigh. 


McGowan, William Tillman, 


Arts, 


Lake Comfort. 


McKinnon, William Hugh, Jr., 


Arts, 


Red Springs. 


McLean, William DeRoy, 


Arts, 


Sedalia. 


McMillan, Albert Powers, 


Arts, 


Payetteville. 


Matthews, Luther Preston, 


Arts, 


Poindexter. 


Morrison, Allen Turner, 


Arts, 


Asheville. 


Nash, Abner, 


Phil, 


Charlotte. 


Nicholson, Samuel Timothy, 


Arts, 


Bath. 


Noe, Walter Raleigh, 


Arts, 


Beaufort. 


'Berry, Thomas, 


Arts, 


Goldsboro. 


Palmer, John Brame, 


Arts, 


Macon. 


Parker, John Johnston, 


Arts, 


Monroe. 


Parker, Luther Wood, 


Arts, 


Hertford. 


Parker, Walter Lafayette, 


Arts, 


Margarettsville. 


Patrick, Joseph Benjamin, 


Sci., 


Chocowinity. 


Peace, Alexander Winston, 


Opt., 


Oxford. 


Peirce, Christopher Dudley, 


Arts, 


Warsaw. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



117 



Pemberton, John de Jarnette, 


Arts, 


Raleigh. 


Pittman, Thomas Merritt, Jr., 


Sci., 


Henderson. 


Pittman, Wiley Hassell Marion, 


Arts, 


Crisp. 


Pritchard, George Moore, 


Sci. , 


Asheville. 


Rankin, Claude Wharton, 


Arts, 


Fayetteville. 


Robinson, John Moseley, 


Phil., 


Goldsboro. 


Robinson, William Smith O'Brien, 


Phil., 


Goldsboro. 


Shannon, Beverly Oscar, 


Arts, 


Gastonia. 


Sharpe, Charles Cleveland, 


Sci., 


Greensboro. 


Shearer, David Robert, 


Arts, 


Lenoir. 


Skinner, William Pailin, 


Opt., 


Hertford. 


Sloan, Henry Lee, 


Arts, 


Ingold. 


Souders, Floyd Benton, 


Sci., 


Fayetteville. 


Spruill, James Franklin, 


Arts, 


Oriental. 


Stem, Frederick Boothe, 


Chern , 


Darlington, S. C. 


Story, Romy, 


Arts, 


Aho. 


Stowe, Lester Holland, 


Arts, 


Belmont. 


Sutton, Thomas Howey, Jr., 


Arts, 


Fayetteville. 


Tillett, Duncan Patterson, 


A rl:-„ 


Charlotte. 


Weill, Charles Louis, 


Arts, 


Rockingham. 


Wheatly, Claud Robinson, 


Arts, 


Beaufort. 


White, John Lawrence, 


Arts, 


High Point. 


Williams, Victor, 


Arts, 


Weaverville. 


Winborne, Stanley, 


Arts, 


Murfreesboro. 
112 


Freshman 


Class. 




Abbott, Lunsford, 


Arts, 


Kinston. 


Andrews, Columbus, 


Arts, 


King's Creek. 


Andrews, Thomas Wingate, 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Armfleld, Dennis Franklin, 


Arts, 


Fayetteville. 


Auten, John Alexander, 


Arts, 


Charlotte. 


Ballance, Harry Bryant, 


Arts, 


Fremont. 


Banks , Benjamin Leonidas, Jr. , 


Elect. Law, 


Elizabeth City. 


Barker, Christopher Sylvanus, 


Arts, 


Fremont. 


Beale, Carl Wingate, 


Elect. 


Portecasi. 


Bear, Charles Edgar, 


Elect. 


Roanoke, Va, 



118 STUDENT8 




Boylan, William James, 


Arts, 


Raleigh. 


Boy Ian, William Montfont, 


Arts, 


Raleigh. 


Bray, Emmett Perleyman, 


Arts, 


Mt Vernon Springs. 


Bridgers, Robert Rufus, 


Arts, 


Wilmington. 


Bright, Christopher Roberts, 


Arts, 


Washington. 


Britt, Wade Hampton, 


Arts, 


Newton Grove. 


Brown, Cecil Bayard, 


Arts, 


Philadelphia,Tenn. 


Brown, Walter Converse, 


Arts, 


Winston-Salem. 


Buchanao, Frederick Lee, 


Arts, 


Bakersville. 


Byerly, Edward Cleveland, 


Arts, 


Yadkin College. 


Cannon, Martin Luther, 


Arts, 


Concord. 


Chatham, Raymond Hunt, 


Arts, 


Elkin. 


Clarke, Bertram Cleland, 


Arts, 


Walnut Cove. 


Clybnrn, Beckham Hilton, 


Arts, 


Haile Mine, S. 0. 


Cobb, Edgar Whitson Sherer, 


Arts, 


Sedalia. 


Cobb, John Daniel Franklin, 


Arts, 


Sedalia. 


Coghill, Julian Baxter, 


Arts, 


Henderson. 


Cooper, James Crawford, 


Arts, 


Oxford. 


Conger, Edward Chamberlain, 


Elect., 


Edenton. 


Coughenoiir, William Chambers, Jr., 


Arts, 


Salisbury . 


Coward, John Holladay, 


Arts, 


Ay den. 


Cowles, David Hamelton, 


Arts, 


Washington, D. 0. 


Cox, Oliver Cromwell, 


Arts, 


Leaksville. 


Curtis, Jesse William, 


Arts, 


Finley. 


Davis, James Blaine, 


Arts, 


Clemmons. 


Davis, William Barham, 


Arts, 


Warrenton. 


Davis, Walter Gray, 


Arts, 


Fremont. 


Deal, Claude Andrew, 


Arts, 


Wardlaw. 


Danlap, Frank Lemuel, 


Arts, 


Wadesboro. 


Dunlap, Fleetwood Ward, 


Arts, 


Ansonville. 


Eagles, Theophilus Randolph, Jr., 


Arts, 


Fountain. 


Elliott, Fred, 


Arts, 


Charlotte. 


Elliott, Horace Copley, 


Arts, 


Gilkey. 


Euiersou, William Parsley, 


Arts, 


Wilmington. 


Fore, James Albert, Jr., 


Arts, 


Charlotte. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



119 



Fountain, George Marion, 
Frazier, Arthur Marsh, 
Gardner, William Seviere, 
Gibson, Williams Hinson, 
Giddings, Joseph Emmet, 
Gillam, Peter Baseoe, 
Gold, Charles Fortune, 
Grantham, John Albert, 
Gray, James Alexander, Jr., 
Greenwood, Adolphus Bart, 
Gunter, Herbert Brown, 
Hackney, George, Jr., 
Hall, Cooper Andrew, 
Hamby, Andrew Cleveland, 
Harllee, Edgar Oooley, 
Harper, George Vernon, 
Harris, Benjamin Franklin, 
Harris, Hal Hamlin, 
Hassell, Calvin Woodard, 
Hester, John William, 
Hicks, William Jacob, 
Hines, Thomas McEntyre, 
Hocutt, John Bunyan, 
Holt, Dewitt, 
Holt, John Harvey, 
Hurt, Charles Elmer, 
Jackson, James Clarke 
Jackson, John Quincey, 
Judd, Eugene Clarence, 
Keel, James Thomas, 
Laughinghouse, Edward, 
Lee, Harry Pipkin, 
*Lisk, John Wesley, Jr., 
Littleton, Thomas Jerome, 
Lyle, Samuel Harley, Jr., 



Arts, 


Tarboro. 


Arts, 


Salisbury. 


Arts, 


Burnsville. 


Arts, 


Hickory. 


Arts, 


Mount Olive. 


Arts, 


Windsor. 


Arts, 


Shelby. 


Arts, 


Goldsboro. 


Arts, 


Winston-Salem. 


Arts, 


Barnardsville. 


Arts, 


Sanford. 


Arts, 


Wilson. 


Arts, 


Woodsdale. 


Arts, 


Stony Fork. 


Arts, 


Greensboro. 


Arts, 


Charlotte. 


Arts, 


Henderson. 


Elect.. 


Franklin ton. 


Arts, 


Williams ton. 


Arts, 


Hester. 


Chem. 


Goldsboro. 


Arts, 


Rocky Mount. 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Arts, 


Graham. 


Arts, 


Oak Ridge. 


Arts, 


Rusk. 


Arts, 


Fayetteville. 


Arts, 


Wilson. 


Arts, 


New Hill. 


Arts, 


Wilson. 


Arts, 


Greenville. 


Arts, 


Reynoldson. 


Arts, 


Norwood. 


Arts, . 


Albemarle. 


Arts, 


Franklin, 



* Deceased. 



120 


STUDENTS 




McLean, Colin Ray, 


Arts, 


Vass. 


McRae, Robert Strange, Jr., 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Macon, Gideon Hunt, 


Arts, 


Warrenton. 


Mafflt, M'Kean, 


C.E., 


Charlotte. 


Malone, Edmund Lncien, 


Arts, 


Washington. 


Mann, Joseph Spencer, 


Arts, 


Fairfield. 


Mitchell, Adrian Seymour, 


Elect. Law, 


Win ton. 


Mitchell, Henry Davis, 


Arts, 


Franklinton. 


Moon, Otis John, 


Elect. Law, 


Danville, Ind, 


Moore, James Logan, 


Arts, 


Ellijay. 


r oore, Walter McDowell, 


Arts, 


Granite Falls. 


>rrison, Mary Grahaii, 


Spec,. 


Mariposa. 


)Ber, Wil-iani Dexter, 


Arts, 


Rock Creek. 


Moss, Zebnlon Vance, 


Arts, 


Pennington. 


Muse, Basil Gantt, 


Arts, 


Rocky Mount. 


Nance, Pau Harris, 


Arts, 


Winston-Salem. 


Newell, Eugene Joseph, 


Arts, 


Mapleville. 


Newton, David Zero, 


Arts, 


Lincolnton. 


Nicholls, James Benton, Jr., 


' Arts, 


Wiudsor. 


Noble, Stuart Grayson, 


Arts, 


Bushnell. 


Oates , William Mercer, 


Arts, 


Tarboro. 


Orr, Manlius, 


Arts, 


Charlotte. 


Palmer, Norville Finley, 


Arts, 


Hookerton. 


Patterson, John Durand, 


Arts, 


Newbern. 


Pender. Thomas Ogburn, 


Arts, 


Joppa. 


Pickard, Robert Otis, 


Arts, 


Wilson. 


Pickard, Walter Watson, Jr., 


Elect. Med.\ 


Chapel Hill. 


Porter, James Melville, 


Arts, 


Greensboro. 


Powers, Percy, Jr., 


Arts, 


Method. 


Powers, Troy Cornelius, 


Arts, 


Lumberton. 


Rand, Oscar Ripley, 


Arts, 


Smithfield. 


Raney, George Hall, 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Raper Wesley Carlton, 


Arts, 


High Point. 


Ray, William Angus, 


Arts, 


Sanford. 


Reynolds, Benjamin Franklia 


Arts, 


Malee. 


Riddick, William Moore, Jr., 


Arts, 


Hertford. 





FRESHMAN CLASS 


1 


Robins, Marrnaduke, 


Arts, 


Asbeboro. 


Rogers, George Oroon, 


Arts, 


Graham. 


Rosebro, William Walter, 


Arts, 


Cleveland. 


Rosin, Mary L., 


Spec, 


Brooklyn, TS; Y. 


Ross, Frank Howard, 


Arts, 


Charlotte. 


Ross, Lloyd McCreight, 


Arts, 


Charlotte. 


Royster, Percy Hoke, 


Arts, 


Raleigh. 


Royster, Wilbur High, 


Arts, 


Raleigh. 


Ruffin, Colin Bradley, 


Arts, 


Tarboro. 


Ruffin, Ernest Cofield, 


Arts, 


Whitakers. 


Sellers, Job Boger, 


Arts, 


Asheville. 


Seymour, David Montre, 


Arts, 


Sanford. 


Skull, Joseph Rush, 


Arts, 


Concord. 


Simmons, Thomas Levy, 


Arts, 


Shelby. 


Singletary, Snowden, 


Arts, 


Clarkton. 


Snow, Edgar Norris, 


Arts, 


Hillsboro. 


Speas, Jeannie Whewell, 


Arts, 


Donnaha. 


Spencer, Frederick Brunell, 


Arts, 


Lake Comfort. 


Stewart, Edward Latham, 


Arts, 


Washington. 


Sutton, Frederick Isler, 


Arts, 


Kinston. 


Thomas, Afestur Sperling, 


Arts, 


Newbern. 


Thompson, John Melvin, 


Arts, 


Graham. 


Turnage, Needham Coy, 


Elect. Med., 


Wilson. 


Umstead, Walter Williams, 


Arts, 


Durham. 


Venable, Cantey McDowell, 


Spec, 


Chapel Hill. 


Vinson, Barnard Bee, 


Arts, 


Littleton. 


Wallace, Wilson, Jr., 


Elect. Med., 


Charlotte. 


Watson, Walter, 


Arts, 


Newbern. 


Weaver, Charles Gay, 


Elect. Law, 


Weaverville. 


Weaver, James Ralph, 


Arts, 


Weaverville. 


Webb, Charles Jordan, 


Elect. Med., 


Roxboro. 


Webb, Louis Harward, 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Webber, William Slade, 


Elect. Law, 


Norfolk, Va. 


Wells, John David, 


Arts, 


Wilson. 


West, Louis, 


Elect., 


Raleigh. 


Whitley, George Thaddeus, 


Arts, 


Smithfield. 



121 



122 



STUDENTS 



Wiggins, James Middleton, Arts, 

Williams, Herbert Blackstook, Arts, 

Williams, Marion Murphy, Arts, 

Williams, Patrick Murphy, Arts, 

Williams, Robert Cleveland, Arts, 

Willis, Norman Lee, Elect., 

Withers, Douglas Dell, Arts, 

Witherspoon, John Grier, Arts, 

Woodard, Etheldred Henry, Arts, 

Woodard, William Coleman, Jr., Arts, 

Woollen, Glen Lacy, Elect. Med., 

Wright, Martin Leroy, Arts, 

Wyatt, Wortham, Arts, 

Yelverton, William Elmer, Arts, 

Students in Law. 

Regular Session. 

Adams, Henry Bethune, Jr., a.b., Trinity, 1904, 

Askew, Edward Stephenson, a.b., 1899, 

Barry, James Edward, 

Bellamy, William McKoy, 

Boone, Robert Baxter, Jr., 

Brawley, Sumpter Coe, 

Bridgers, Burke Haywood, ph.b., 1903, 

Broadhurst, Edgar David, ph.b., 1899, 

Brothers, Henry Linwood, 

Bryan, Roderick Adams, 

Bynum, Frederick Williamson, 

Carpenter, Caius Hunter, 

Carter, Henry Clay, Jr., 

Cheshire, John, 

Clark, Walter, Jr., b.e., A. and M., C, 1903, 

Clegg, William Russell, B.S., Davidson, 1902, 

Cotten, Preston Sims, 

Daniels, Caxl Lehman, 

Dunn, David" Wilson, 



Suffolk, Va. 
Democrat. 
Rose Hill. 
Wallace. 
Rose Hill. 
Beaufort. 
Charlotte. 
Mooresville. 
Wilson. 
Rocky Mount. 
Winston-Salem. 
Greensboro. 
Wadesboro. 
Pikeville. 
166 



Monroe. 

Windsor. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Wilmington. 

Durham. 

Charlotte. 

Wilmington. 

Goldsboro. 

Fayetteville. 

Carthage. 

Pittsboro. 

Clifton Forge, Va. 

Fairfield. 

Tarboro. 

Raleigh. 

Carthage. 

Bruce. 

Newbem. 

Lone Oak, Va. 



STUDENTS IN LAW 



123 



Elliott, Horace Copley, 

Faison, Paul Fletcher, 

Farriss, Edward Holden, 

Ford, Joseph Fanning, 

Fowle, Daniel Gould, 

Gilmer, Joseph Branner, 

Gold, Thomas Jackson, ph.b., 1903, 

Gudger, Vanno Lamar, b.s., Univ. of Tenn., 1904, 

Hampton, Laurence Herburt, 

Henderson, Ezekiel, 

Hoffman, John Robert, 

Kenan, Graham, a.b., 1904, 

Kluttz, Samuel Walkup, 

Lane, Henry Protchett, 

McBrayer, Frederick Wilkins, 

McGeachy, Arthur, 

McMullan, Harry, 

Mebane, Charles Harden, a.b., Catawba College, 1891, 

Moore, Jerome Rea, 

Newton, James Sprunt, ph.b. , 1904, 

Osborne, James Walker, 

Patton, George Manuel, 

Redd, Forest Marion, 

Ruark, Joseph Waters, 

Sawyer, Ernest Linwood, ph.b., 1904, 

Schenck, Paul, 

Scroggs, James Wardlaw, a.b., Trinity, 1902, 

Sherrod, William Jeremiah, 

Simmons, Thomas William, 

Stewart, Roach Sidney, ph.b., 1903, 

Winborne, James Wallace, 

Wooten, Stephen Chapman, 

Summer Term. 

Ansell, Samuel T., Lieutenant, U.S.A., 
Barbour, James Romeo, 
Barbour ,*Offee Almond, 



Gilkey. 
Raleigh. 
High Point. 
Asheville. 
Raleigh. 
Waynesville. 
Shelby. 
Asheville. 
Sylva. 
Deppe. 
Whitsett. 
Kenansville. 
Chester, S. O. 
Leaksville. 
Rutherford ton. 
Chipley, Fla. 
Edenton. 
Newton. 
Columbia, S. C. 
Magnolia. 
Charlotte. 
Elon College. 
Charlotte. 
Southport. 
Elizabeth City. 
Greensboro. 
Greensboro. 
Hamilton. 
Mints. 
O. K., S. C. 
Mege. 
Fountain. 
51 

West Point, N. Y. 

Benson. 

Benson. 



124 



STUDENTS 



Black, Frederick Leroy, 

Boggan, Henry Smith, 

Brown, Sidney Glenn, 

Carpenter, John Graham, 

Chastain, Rufus Benjamin, a.b., 1902, 

Cotten, Preston Sims, 

Cumming, Preston, ph.b., 1903, 

Daniel, Erasmus Alston, Jr., a.b., 1904, 

DeLaney, James Lester, 

Dortch, James Tyson, 

Dunn, William, Jr., ph.b., 1904, 

Everett, Simon Justus, ph.b., 1902, 

Faison, Paul Fletcher, 

Farriss, Edward Holden, 

Fowle, Daniel Gould, 

Gibbs, John Currie, a.b., Trinity, 1897, 

Gold, Thomas Jackson, ph.b., 1903, 

Harris, Eugene, a.b., Wake Forest, 1898, 

Hassell, Francis Sylvester, a.b., 1903, 

Haywood, Alfred Williams, Jr., a.b., 1904, 

Holton, Charles Luther, a.b., Guilford, 1903, 

Johnston, Andrew Hall, ph.b., 1904, 

Kluttz, Samuel Walkup, 

Lambert, Maurice Ashby, 

Langston, John Dallas, 

McBrayer, Frederick Wilkins, 

McMullan, Harry, 

Mallonee, James David, 

Matthews, John Hillery, 

Meares, Thomas Davis, 

Pace, William Heck, 

Parker, David Preston, a.b., 1900, a.m., 1901, 

Patton, George Manuel, 

Peace, Alexander Winston, 

Phillips, Wade Hampton, B.8., Erskine, 1900, 

Rollins, Eugene Marvin, 



Davidson. 
Wadesboro. 
Greensboro. 
Stanley. 
Ogden. 
Bruce. 
Wilmington. 
Airlie. 
Charlotte. 
Goldsboro. 
Newbern. 
Palmyra. " 
Raleigh. 
High Point. 
Raleigh. 
Durham. 
Shelby. 
Wadeville. 
Williams ton. 
Haw River. 
Yadkinville. 
Asheville. 
Chester, S.C. 
Raleigh. 
Mount Olive. 
Rutherfordton. 
Edenton. 
Franklin. 
Coleraine. 
Wilmington. 
Raleigh. 

Stephenville, Tex. 
Elon College. 
Oxford. 
Lexington. 
Holly Springs. 



STUDENTS IN LAW 



125 



Rowe, Claude Watson, 

Scroggs, Janies Wardlaw, a.b., Trinity, 1902, 

Simmons, Albert Marchant, a.b., 1887, 

Sinclair, Logan Carson, 

Skinner, Harry, Jr., 

Storn, David Pony, ph.b., 1002, 

Swain, John Edward, ph.b., 1902, 

Taylor, Charles Edward, 

Umstead, Joseph Martin, 

Williams, John Robert, 

Williams, Robert Ransom, a.b., 1902, 

Elementary Law. 

Bond, William Marion, Jr., 
Buchanan, Corsey Candler, 
Carr, Claiborn McDowell, 
Cole, Worth, 
Cox, Francis Augustus, 
Dalton, Archie Carter, 
Davis, Henry Wiley, 
Duncan, James Shepard, 
Fletcher, Arthur Lloyd, 
Galloway, James Cleveland, 
Galloway, Thomas, 
Goslen, Junius Blake, 
Hannah, John George, Jr., 
Leary, Ernest Woodard, 
London, Isaac Spencer, 
Love, Walter Bennett, 
Lyon, Otho Devanne, 
Mitchell, Adrian Seymour, 
Moon, Otis John, 
Moore, Andrew Jackson, 
Nash, Abner, 
Perry, Bennett Hester, 
Pittman, Wiley Hassell Marion, 



Monroe. 
Greensboro. 
Currituck. 
Marion. 
Greenville. 
Scotland Neck. 
Democrat. 
Sotithport. 
Durham. 
Apex. 
Newton. 
50 

Edenton. 

Sylva. 

Durham. 

Charlotte. 

Penelo. 

Greensboro. 

Salisbury. 

Beaufort. 

Jefferson. 

Grimesland. 

Quebec. 

Winston-Salem. 

Siler City. 

Edenton. 

Pittsboro. 

Monroe. 

Hester. 

Winton. 

Danville, Ind. 

Greenville. 

Charlotte. 

Henderson. 

Crisp. 



126 StUDB 

Rountree, Louis Gustavus, 


NTS 


Brooklyn, N. T. 


Stancell, Samuel Turner, 




Margarettesville. 


Staton, John Arthur, 




Bethel. 


Wade, James Lloyd, 




Dunn. 


Weaver, Charles Guy, 




Weaverville. 


Webber, William Slade, 




Norfolk, Va. 


Wheatly, Olaude Robinson, 




Beaufort. 


Whitaker, George Thomas, 




Letha. 


Willis, Norman Lee, 




Beaufort. 


Wilson, William Miller, 




Rock Hill, S. C. 


Wood, John Gilliam, Jr., 




Edenton. 


Wrenn, Clement, 




Mount Airy. 


Students in 


Medicine. 


85 


Name. 


Yeab. 


Residence. 


Abernethy, Claude Oliver, B.S., 1902, 


Third, 


Chapel Hill. 


Absher, Darius Cleveland, 


First, 


Obids. 


Apgar, Raymond, 


Second, 


Allentown, Pa. 


Barefoot, Julius Jackson, 


Second, 


Wilson. 


Berry, John, Jr., 


First, 


Chapel Hill. 


Best, Henry Blount, 


Second, 


Wilson. 


Bitting, Numa Duncan, 


Second, 


Rural Hall. 


Bolton, Marvin Ewing, 


First, 


Capels Mills. 


Braddy, Wade Hampton, 


First, 


Jessama. 


Brittain, Arthur Gordon, 


First, 


Pollocksville. 


Browne, Alfred Dana, 


Second, 


Germantown, Pa, 


Buckner, James Marion, 


First, 


Democrat. 


Chapin, William Burdette, 


First, 


Pittsboro. 


Choate, Bert, 


First, 


Sparta. 


Conwell, Charles Everett, 


Fourth, 


Raleigh. 


Cooke, Quinton Henry, 


Fourth, 


Aulander. 


Covington, Piatt Walker, 


First, 


Wadesboro. 


Cranmer, John Bensell, 


Fourth, 


Chapel Hill. 


Davidson, Edwin Norvell, 


First, 


Nuckols, Va. 


Dick, Julius Vance, 


Second, 


Whitsett. 


Dixon, Rufus Herbert, 


First, 


Bishopville, S. 0, 



STUDENTS IN MEDICINE 



137 



Donnelly, John, 

Eagles, Charles Sidney, 

English, Arthur Brown, 

Farrar, Mont Royal, 

Farthing, Logan Elmore, 

Ferrell, John Atkinson, 

Gatling, Franklin Porter, 

Gibson, Harry Preston, 

Glenn, Marshall Renfro, s.b., 1903, 

Green, William Willis, Jr., 

Gregg, James Dennis, 

Harris, David Watson, 

Hiatt, Houston Boyd, 

Hobgood, James Edward, 

Hocutt, Battle Applewhite, 

Hyatt, Frederick Oarlyle, 

James, William Daniel, 

Johnson, Percy, 

Jones, Harry Murray, a.b., 1903, 

Jordan, William Stone, 

Kerr, John Daniel, Jr. , 

Lane, Paul Peyton, 

Ledbetter, Penlie Brisco, 

Leinbach, Robert Frederick, 

Long, Thomas Williams Mason, 

McBrayer, Charles Evans, 

Mclver, Evander McNair, ph.b., 1904, 

McLean, Allen, 

McLean, Alexander Torrey, 

McLean, Frank, 

McPherson, Robert Gray, 

Maness, John Moses, 

Mayerberg, Israel Wallace, 

Maynard, Julian Decator, 

Merritt, John Hamlett, 

Monk, George Monroe, 



Fourth, 


Charlotte. 


First, 


Saratoga. 


Third, 


Faust. 


Fourth, 


Greensboro. 


Third, 


Boone. 


First, 


Clinton. 


First, 


Tarboro. 


First, 


Waterford. 


Second, 


Asheville. 


First, 


Franklinton. 


First, 


Kimesville. 


First, 


Fayette ville. 


Second, 


Clinton. 


Second, 


Oxford. 


Third, 


Wakefield. 


Second, 


Waynes ville. 


Second, 


Laurinburg. 


First, 


Hobgood. 


Third, 


Franklin. 


Third, 


Raleigh. 


First, 


Clinton. 


First, 


Wilson. 


First, 


Davidson River. 


Second, 


Winston-Salem. 


Second, 


Garysburg. 


First, 


Shelby. 


Second, 


Jonesboro. 


First, 


Laurinburg. 


First, 


Max ton. 


First, 


Maxton. 


First, 


Holinan's Mills. 


Second, 


Hemp. 


Second, 


Goldsboro. 


First, 


Bradshaw. 


Third, 


Roxboro. 


First, 


Newton Grove. 



128 

Moore, Charles Edward, 
Moore, Joseph Newitt, 
Moore, Kinchin Carl, 
Morris, George Blythe, 
Newell, Leone Burns, a.b., 1900, 
Nichols, Austin Flint, 
Nichols, Edward William, 
Noble, Robert Primrose, 
Nuckols, Ernest Benjamin, 
Query, Richard Zimri, 
Reid, James William, 
Rice, Wilbur Calhoun, 
Riggsbee, Edward Jackson, 
Roberson, Foy, 
Rosin, Clifton, 
Royster, Thomas Hays, 
Russell, Charles Richard, 
Scofield, Everett J., 
Shepard, Frank Armfield, 
Simpson, Walter Alexander, 
Smith, Harrison Talmage, 
Smith, John McNeill, 
Smith, Thomas Harley, 
Spoon, Arthur Ogburn, 
Spoon, Charles Edgar, 
Stephens, Ralph Saunders, 
Taylor, Ernest Dawson, 
Terrell, Allen Johnson, 
Upchurch, Robert Theodore, 
Walters, Charles Manly, 
Ward, Ivie Alphonso, 
Ward, Vernon Albert, 
Ware, Major Lee, 
Warren, John Waddell, 
Watkins, Fonso Butler, 
Watson, John Blois, 



STUDENTS 




Second, 


Rural Hall. 


Fourth, 


Saratoga. 


First, 


Wilson. 


First, 


Goldsboro. 


, Fourth, 


Newell. 


First, 


Roxboro. 


First, 


Timberlake. 


Second, 


Selma. 


First, 


Nuckols. 


Second, 


Derita. 


First, 


Lowell. 


Second, 


Sydney, Fla. 


First, 


Riggsbee. 


First, 


Chapel Hill. 


First, 


Brooklyn. 


Second, 


Buchanan. 


First, 


Granite Falls. 


First, 


Wappingers, N. Y 


First, 


Liberty. 


First, 


Raleigh. 


First, 


Anna. 


First, 


Laurinburg. 


First, 


Liberty. 


First, 


Haw River. 


First, 


Oakdale. 


Fourth, 


Smithfield. 


First, 


Tarboro. 


First, 


Old Fort. 


Second, 


Apex. 


First, 


Burlington. 


Second, 


Ryland. 


First, 


Wilson. 


Second, 


Kings Mountain. 


Second, 


Edenton. 


Second, 


Rutherfordton. 


First, 


Raleigh. 



8TUDENTS IN PHARMACY 



129 



Webb, Lorenzo Stevenson, 
Webb, Samplett Edgar, 
Wilcox, Jesse Womble, ph.b., 1903, 
Williams, Leslie Shaw, 
Wilkerson, Charles Baynes, 
Winslow, Oato Franklin, 
Woodard, Albert Gideon, 



Fourth, 


Windsor. 


First, 


Brown Summit. 


Third, 


Putnam. 


First, 


Drake's Br'ch, Va. 


Third, 


Dresham. 


First, 


Mintonsville. 


Second, 


Princeton. 




100 



Students in Pharmacy. 



Name. 

Ashcraft, Carl William, 
Baucom, Alfred Vernon, 
Bulluck, Zebulon Benjamin, 
Carpenter, Oscar Benjamin, 
Carter, Samuel, 
Crabtree, Gilbert, 
Crews, Eugene Thomas, Jr., 
Davidson, Josephus Cornelius, 
Eldridge, James, 
Flagler, Clarence, 
Griffith, Benjamin Wiltshire, 
Hall, Percy Opie, 
Hart, John Albert, 
Herring, Robert Roscoe, 
Holland, Willis Froneberger, 
Hoover, Olin Clyde, 
Hyter, Ernest Harboro, 
Ingram, Samuel Talmage, 
Johnson, Roscoe Spurgeon, 
Layden, Hugh Winborne, 
Lyon, Herman Lewis, 
Marion, John Ernest, 
Miller, Carl Tienken, 
Monger, James McRae, 
Moore, William Houston, 
Nicholson, Russell Cobb, 



Residence. 



First, 


Elkin. 


First, 


Apex. 


First, 


Rocky Mount. 


First, 


Stanley. 


First, 


Salisbury. 


First, 


Raleigh. 


First, 


Oxford. 


First, 


Nuckols, Va. 


First, 


Dunn. 


Second, 


Stroudsburg, Pa. 


First, 


Hendersonville. 


Second, 


Wilmington. 


First, 


Hendersonville. 


First, 


Garland. 


First, 


Mount Holly. 


First, 


Concord. 


First, 


Bradner, Ohio. 


First, 


Star. 


First, 


Enfield. 


First, 


Mege. 


First, 


Fayette ville. 


First, 


Elkin. 


First, 


Wilmington. 


First, 


Sanford. 


First, 


Wilmington. 


First, 


Murfreesboro. 



O'Brien, Lex Cleveland, 


First, 


Winston-Salem. 


Parker, Roland Hurn, 


Second, 


Durham. 


Patterson, Alvis, 


Second, 


Chapel Hill. 


Rose, Ira Winfleld, 


First, 


Benson. 


Schutt, Theodore Henry, 


First, 


Wilmington. 


Scoggin, Lewis Edward, 


First, 

1 


Warrenton. 


Seagle, Frederick Macon, 


First, 


Hickory. 


Shelton, Claude Fuller, 


First, 


High Point. 


Singletary, Frederick Bunyan, 


First, 


Lumberton. 


Smith, Thomas Lane, 


First, 


Edenton. 


Staton, Henry Vernon, 


First, 


Bethel. 


Teague, Moses Fitzhugh, 


First, 


Granite Falls. 


Watkins, Witcher Overton, 


First, 


Rutherfordton. 


Webb, Eugene Lea, 


Second, 


Roxboro. 


Welfare, Samuel Eugene, 


First, 


Winston-Salem. 


White, Charles P., 


First, 


Stroudsburg, Pa. 


Williams, Arthur Bridges, 


First, 


Bladen boro. 


Winder, William Ray, 


Second, 


Elizabeth City. 


Winn, William Ray, 


First, 


Greensboro. 


Wolfe, Drayton, 


First, 


Charlotte. 


Wolfe, John Carl, 


First, 


Albemarle. 

47 



To the roll of Seniors, on page 112, is to be added: 



Name. 
Woollen, Charles Thomas, 



Course. 
Elect., 



Residence. 
Winston-Salem. 



SUMMARY 131 



SUMMARY. 



The College: — 










COUBSE. AHTS. 


Phil. 


Science. 


Elect. 




Seniors, 24 


21 


17 


1 


63 


/juniors, ' 37 


17 


8 


4 


66 


Sophomores, 75 


13 


12 


12 


112 


Freshmen, 145 


— 


— 


2L 


166 
407 


The Graduate Department: 


















34 



The Law Department: — 

Students, Regular Session 51 

Students, Summer Term 50 

c , 101 

Deduct for names counted twice 10 

The Department of Medicine: — 

Fourth- Year Students 9 

Third- Year Students ' 9 

Second Year Students 27 

First- Year Students 55 

The Department of Pharmacy: — 



91 



100 



Second- Year Students 6 

First- Year Students 41 

— 47 



Whole number of students 679 

Deduct for names counted twice 13 



666 



Summary by States. 

North Carolina 619 Georgia 

Virginia 16 Indiana. 

South Carolina 9 Maryland 

Florida 5 Massachusetts 

New York 5 Ohio 

Pennsylvania 4 Tennessee 

District of Columbia 1 Texas 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL. 



FACULTY, SESSION OF 1905. 



FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLE, Ph.D., D.Sc, LL.D., President. 

EBEN ALEXANDER, Ph.D., LL.D., Greek. 

JOHN ADDISON BIVINS, Geography. 

JAMES DOWDEN BRUNER, Ph.D., French. 

COLLIER COBB, A.M., Geology and Photography. 

NATHANIEL CORTLANDT CURTIS, Ph.B., Drawing. 

ALEXANDER GRAHAM, A.M., North Carolina History. 

EDWARD KIDDER GRAHAM, A.M., English. 

WILLIAM C. A. HAMMEL, Manual Training. 

THOMAS PERRIN HARRISON, Ph.D., English. 

HERMAN HARRELL HORNE, Ph.D., Psychology and Education. 

GEORGE HOWE, Ph.D., Latin. 

MARGARET A. JOHNSTON, B.A., Kindergarten. 

JAMES EDWARD LATTA, A.M., Physics. 

GEORGE McFARLAND McKIE, Expression. 

ISAAC HALL MANNING, M.D., Physiology and Hygiene. 

MARCUS CICERO STEVENS NOBLE, Pedagogy. 

JULIA RAINES, Manual Training. 

FRANKLIN LAFAYETTE RILEY, Ph.D., History. 

CHARLES ALPHONSO SMITH, Ph.D., English. 

MARVIN HENDRIX STACY, A.M., Mathematics. 

FRANK LINCOLN STEVENS, Ph.D., Applied Nature Study. 

MRS. FRANK LINCOLN STEVENS, Primary Nature Study. 

WALTER DALLAM TOY, M.A., German. 

LOUIS ROUND WILSON, A.M., Library Methods. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 133 

ANNOUNCEMENT. 

Date of Opening. 4088 teachers enrolled in the past. 

The twentieth annual session of the University Summer School for 
Teachers will begin at 12 o'clock, June 12 (Monday), and close on the after- 
noon of July 8 (Friday). All the resources of the University will be open 
to those who attend, and no effort has been spared to make the twentieth 
session of the Summer School memorable in numbers as well as in the 
character of the work done. 

Free Lectures. 

Every evening during the session public lectures will be given by promi- 
nent speakers and educators. These lectures will deal With problems of 
science, literature, history, methods of teaching, school management, and 
school architecture. The lecturers will be representative men from this 
and other states. 

A Genuine School Expert instructors representing the latest 

_ „ , , developments in school management and 

Of Methods. . methods of teaching. 

The opportunities and advantages offered this year are of even greater 
value and better suited to the needs of the teacher than those which in 
former years have given the Summer School its reputation for merit and 
efficiency. 

In arranging the courses of study, a special effort has been made to pro- 
vide for the following: 

1. Those who are preparing to teach in either public or private schools. 

2. Those teachers who wish to study under experts the best methods 
employed in modern educational endeavor. 

3. The teachers in both public and private schools who desire to broaden 
their scholarship or to improve their methods of instruction and discipline 
by a careful study of the theories and results of practical and successful 
teachers. 



General Plan of A * ota ' of forty-two courses, including sub- 

_ ,. jectsof special value to teachers in every 

Instruction. grade 

The courses may be grouped under the following heads: 



134 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL 



COMMON SCHOOL SUB- 


PSYCHOLOGY AND PEDA- 


HIGH SCHOOL AND COL- 


JECTS AND METHODS. 


GOGY. 


LEGE SUBJECTS. 


Kindergarten. 


Psychology. 


Latin. 


Reading. 


Art of Teaching. 


Greek. 


Expression. 


Philosophy of Education. 


English. 


Elementary Physiology. 


Philosophy of Method. 


French. 


Elementary Physics. 


History of Education. 


German. 


Elementary Arithmetic. 




American History. 


Manual Training. 




English History. 


Elementary Algebra. 




History of North Carolina. 


English Composition. 




Roman and Mediaeval His- 


Geography. 




tory. 


Nature Study. 




Architecture. 


Photography. 




Arithmetic and Algebra. 


Drawing. 




Geology. 


Elementary History of the 




Mineralogy. 


United States. 




Hygiene. 


History of North Carolina. 




Botany. 

Chemistry 

Physics. 



Certificates will be issued to those members of the school who regularly 
attend and satisfactorily complete courses amounting, in the aggregate, to 
eighteen hours. 



Special 
Advantages. 



All the privileges of the University open to 
students of the Summer School and at less 
cost than at any other season of the year. 



Lecture 
Course. 



A regular course of lectures, both scientific and literary, has. 
been provided, many of them being of direct, practical value 
to the teacher, and dealing with vital questions connected with 
the growth and development of our schools. The lecture course will be 
free, and will contribute greatly to the pleasure and profit of the teachers. 
The University Library, which contains more than 42,000 
Library. volumes, and the Reading Room, supplied with the best peri- 
odicals and newspapers, will be open daily to members of the Summer 
School. There will thus be furnished, free of cost, an opportunity for 
collateral reading on any of the courses of study, and general reading in a 
wide range of subjects. 

The Physical, Chemical, Botanical, and Zoological Labora- 
tories of the University are modern in their equipment and 
are at the service of the Summer School. Laboratory meth- 
ods and experience are necessary to the successful teacher, and can be 



Labora 
tories. 



COURSES OF STUDY 135 

readily acquired only by doing laboratory work under the guidance of 
skilled instructors. 

The University buildings are located in a well-shaded campus 
Campus. Q f near ]y fifty acreSi an (i Chapel Hill, with an elevation of 
five hundred feet, shady streets, and pure drinking water, offers a delight- 
ful summer home. 

The entire expense for registration fee, furnished room in the 
ow cost, dormitories, with electric light and baths, and board at Com- 
mons Hall, is only fifteen dollars. The cost of attending any other Sum- 
mer School, offering equal advantages of instruction, would be more than 
three times this amount. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 

Pedagogy. 

Professor M. C. S. Noble. 

1. The Development and Philosophy of Method. 
Professor H. H. Hornb. 

2. Application of the Mental Sciences to the Art of Teaching. 

3. The Formation of Character. 

English. 

Professor C. Alphonso Smith. 

1. Essays and Essayists. 

2. Talks on the History and Structure of the English Language. 
Professor Thomas P. Harrison. 

8. The English Novel. 
Professor Edward K. Graham. 

4. English Composition. 

5. The Study of English Classics. 

Mr. G. M. McKie. 

6. Expression, Voice Culture, Reading. 

7. ShakesDeare. 



136 THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

History. 

Professor Franklin L. Riley. 

1. Elementary Course in American and General History. 

2. High School Course in American History. 

3. High School Course in English History. 
Professor Alexander Graham. 

4. History of North Carolina. 

Mathematics. 

Professor M. C. S. Noble. 

1. Elementary Arithmetic. 
Mr. M. H. Stacy. 

2. Advanced Arithmetic. 
3 Algebra. 

Geography. 

Principal J. A. Bivins. 

1. Primary Geography. 

2. Observation Lessons on Brooks, Stars, Soil, Rocks, Weather, etc. 

Geology, Mineralogy, and Photography. 

Professor Collier Cobb. 

1. Elementary Geology. 

2. Elementary Mineralogy. 

3. Field Photography. 

Physics, Modeling, and Cardboard. 

Professor J. E. Latta. 

1. Elementary Physics. 

Professor William C. A. Hammel and Miss Julia Raines.- 

2. Clay Modeling. 

8. Paper Folding and Construction in Cardboard. 



COURSES OF STUDY 137 

4. Basketry. 

5. Knife Work. 

Courses 2, 3, 4, and 5 deal with some of the forms of hand work that are 
practical in all grades in the rural as well as in the city schools 
and with such forms as can be carried on in the class room by the 
teacher. 

Nature Study. 

Professor F. L. Stevens. 

1. Applied Nature Study: Agricultural Study of the Plant, the Animal, 

and the Soil. 
Mrs. F. L. Stevens. 

2. Primary Nature Study. The aim of this course is to introduce teachers 

of little children both of the city and country schools to those 
objects in nature which form a great part of the child's early 
experience. Elementary Geography is included. 

Physiology and Hygiene. 

Professor Isaac Hall Manning. 
1. Elementary Physiology. 

Drawing and Architecture. 

Mr. N. 0. Curtis. 

1. Freehand Drawing. 

2. Elements of Architecture. 

Kindergarten. 

Miss M. A. Johnston. 

1. Practical Blethods in Primary Work. 

2. A Course in Froebel's Mother Play, and Occupations suitable to pres- 

ent day requirements. 



138 THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

Greek. 

Professor Bben Alexander. 

1. For Beginners. 

2. Book I. of Homer's Iliad. 

Latin. 

Professor George Howe. 

1 . Elementary Course. 

2. Advanced Course. 

French. 

Professor J. D. Bruner. 

1. Elementary Course, with practice in speaking French. 

2. Advanced Course. 

German. 

Professor W. D. Toy. 

1 . Elementary Course. 

2. Advanced Course. 

In both courses there will be practice in speaking German. 

Library School. 

Mr. L. B. Wilson. 
1. Library work and methods. Lectures, with practice in the Library. 

EXPENSES. 

There will be no charge for tuition in the Summer School. An inci- 
dental fee of five dollars will, however, be charged. This pays for the use 
of the library, gymnasium, laboratories, etc. 

Double rooms in the University dormitories may be engaged in advance, 
at $2.00 for the session for each occupant, by writing to the Registrar. A 



STUDENTS IN SUMMER SCHOOL 



139 



few single rooms are available at |2.00 each. These rooms are furnished, 
except with bed linen and towels. The charge for rent includes service, 
electric lights, and baths. 

The price of table board at Commons Hall is $8.00 for the session. For 
a shorter period, the rate is $3.00 a week, or fifty cents a day. 

Rooms may be secured at the Bursar's office, Alumni Hall. For board 
tickets, apply to the Treasurer at Commons Hall. 

All charges are payable in advance. 

There will be reduced rates on all the railroads. 

For the Announcement of the Summer School, with detailed informa- 
tion, address 

FRANCIS P. VENABLE, President, 

Chapel Hill, N. O. 



STUDENTS IN SUMMER SCHOOL, 1904. 



Alexander, Mary, 
Allen, Lula, 
Allen, Robert Wilson, 
Allen, Sarah, 
Andrews, Dora, 
Archer, Gray, 
Austin, Iowa, 
Ayres, Irma, 
Banks, Katie Lee, 
Barbee, Mrs. A. S., 
Barbee, Nellie Lewis, 
Battle, Elizabeth, 
Bernard, William Stanly, 
Berry, Ruth, 
Best, Alice F., 
Blake, Lottie, 
Blue, Janie. 
Blue, Lena, 
Bowling, Corinne, 
Bowling, Nanaie, 



Asheville.l 
Prospect Hill. 
Wadesboro. 
Polktown. 
Chapel Hill. 
Chapel Hill. 
Corolla. 
Nichols, S. C 
' Haw River. 
Chapel Hill. 
Chapel Hill. 
Greensboro. 
Chapel Hill. 
Newbern. 
Fremont. 
Gastonia. 
Efland. 
Efland. 
Rougemont. 
Durham. 



140 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL 



Brantley, Nora, 
Broadhurst, Edgar D.; 
Bryan, Catharine, 
Bryan, Eliza, 
Bryan, Lula, 
Bruner, Mrs. J. D., 
Burgess, Julia, 
Butt, Charles, 
Campbell, Lillian, 
Cannady, Georgia, 
Cannady, Mary, 
Carraway, Daphne, 
Carraway, Irma, 
Carson, Queen, 
Chadwick, Annie D. , 
Chastain, Rufus Benjamin, 
Claytor, Carrie, 
Clay tor, Numa Reid, 
Cobb, Mrs. Collier, 
Cobb, Lucy Maria, 
Cobb, Penelope Williams, 
Cobb, William Battle, 
Coble, Circe, 
Coit, Johnsie, 
Cole, Walter, 
Conley, James Robert, 
Conrad, Elizabeth, 
Cothran, Allie, 
Cranmer, Mrs. J. B., 
Creech, Mrs. A., 
Croom, G. H., 
Crowell, George Henry, 
Daniel, Martha, 
Daniel, Sarah, 
Dayvault, Nina Lee, 
Deans, Iva, 



Spring Hope. 

Greensboro. 

Chapel Hill. 

Chapel Hill. 

Chapel Hill. 

Chapel Hill. 

Washington. 

Charlotte. 

Gaylord. 

South Lowell. 

South Lowell. 

Wilson. 

Wilson. 

Asheville. 

Newbern. 

Brasstown. 

Durham. 

Durham. 

Chapel Hill. 

Demopolis, Ala. 

Chapel Hill. 

Chapel Hill. 

Liberty. 

Salisbury. 

Rockingham. 

Lenoir. 

Charlotte. 

Rougemont. 

Chapel Hill. 

Goldsboro. 

Burgaw. 

High Point. 

Breeze. 

■Oxford. 

Concord. 

Wilson. 



Students in summer school 



141 



DeLaney, James Lester, 
Duuu, Annie, 
Dunn, Kate, 
Dunn, Minnie, 
Farmer, Eva, 
Faucette, Lena, 
Ferrell, John Atkinson, 
Flinton, Estelle, 
Fonville, DeRoy, 
Forbes, Marshall Bray, 
Foust, Mrs. Sallie M., 
Fuller, Mrs. Susie Webb, 
George, Katie, 
Graham, Neill Ray, 
Hackney, Bessie, 
Hall, Willie T., 
Hamby, Andrew Cleveland, 
Harden, S. G., 
Harris, Eugene, 
Hassell, Francis Sylvester, 
Henderson, Rebecca Lee, 
Henson, Joseph B. , 
Higdon, Thomas Bragg, 
Hines, Julian Colegate, Jr., 
Hocutt, John Caswell, 
Hodgin, Bertha, 
Holahan, Mrs. Winifred,' 
Holmes, Howard Braxton, 
Howe, George, 
Hume, Thomas, Jr., 
Huskabee, Ora, 
Huske, Mary Weldon, 
Hutchison, Susan, 
Ingram, James Calvin, 
Irwin, James Preston, 
Jerkins, Mrs. S. C, 



Charlotte. 

Scotland Neck. 

Scotland Neck. 

Scotland Neck. 

Wilson. 

Lenoir. 

Clinton. 

Rougemont. 

Elon College. 

Shiloh. 

Greensboro. 

Warren Plains. 

Wilmington. 

Charlotte. 

Durham. 

Caldwell Institute. 

Rock Spring. 

Reidsville. 

Wadeville. 

Williamston. 

Yanceyville. 

Ghoestoe, Ga. 

Higdon ville. 

Morven. 

Chapel Hill. 

Greensboro. 

Chapel Hill. 

Elon College. 

Chapel Hill. 

Winston-Salem. 

Albemarle. 

Fayetteville. 

Charlotte. 

Palmerville. 

Charlotte. 

Newbern. 



142 



THE SDMltER SCHOOL 



Johnston, Mrs. T. E., 
Jones, Mary Best, 
Jordan, Strowd, 
Keller, John H., 
Kenyon, Mary Frances, 
Kerley, Alonzo Commodore, 
Kibler, William Herbert, 
King, Emma, 
King, Gray B., 
Kirk, Verona, 
Kluttz, Ada, 
Kluttz, Mrs. A. A., 
Lanibe, Eliza, 
Lasley, Cora, 
Leggett, Jennie, 
Leslie, Annie, 
Leslie, Laura, 
Lewis, Mittie, 
Lindsay, Seaton Gales, 
Long, Mattie, 
Lynch, Nannie, 
McAllister, George Franklin, 
McCauley, Cora, 
McOullers, Claudia, 
McDuffie, J. F„ 
Mclver, Claude, 
Mclver, James Harry, 
McKinnie, Birdie, 
MacNider, George Mallett, 
McNider, James Small, 
McRae, Mrs. C. F., 
McRae, Mrs. J. O , 
Maddry, Charles Edward, 
Mangum, Mrs. C. S.. 
Mangum, Ernest P., 
Mann, Wade Hampton, 



Salisbury. 

Goldsboro. 

Caldwell Institute. 

Mount Pleasant. 

Hillsboro. 

Morganton. 

Morganton. 

High Point. 

Wilson. 

Palmerville. 

Albemarle. 

Chapel Hill. 

William ston. 

Oaks. 

Scotland Neck. 

Oaks. 

Concord. 

Goldsboro. 

Lindsay. 

Chapel Hill. 

University Station. 

Mount Pleasant. 

Chapel Hill. 

McCullers. 

Roxboro. 

Graham. 

Charlotte. 

Reidsville. 

Chapel Hill. 

Chapanoke. 

Wilmington. 

Chapel Hill. 

Hillsboro. 

Chapel Hill. 

Wilson. 

Saxapahaw. 



STUDENTS IN SUMMER SCHOOL 



143 



Martin, Annie, 
Martin, Sadie, 
Matthews, Bertha, 
Matthews, Ruth, 
Meade, William H., 
Meares, Thomas Davis, 
Merritt, Robert Amsei, 
Mickle, Robina, 
Moore, William Milliken, 
Morrow, Rufus Clegg, 
Morrow, Selina, 
Mosely, Fannie, 
Moss, W. T. D., 
Murchison, Marie, 
Nichols, Bertha, 
Noble, Albert Morris, 
Nunn, Etta, 
Nye, Fernando Cortez, 
Osborne, Josephine, 
Parker, David Preston, 
Patterson, Janie, 
Patton, George, 
Payne, Elizabeth, 
Pearson, Joseph Edward, 
Pender, Thomas Ogburn, 
Perry, Rex William, 
Pescud, Belle, 
Pescud, Jennie, 
Phipps, Emma, 
Pickard, Blanche Pamelia, 
Plummer, Mrs. O. E., 
Plyler, Marion Timothy, 
Porter, Mary, 
Pratt, Mrs. J. H., 
Pressly, Mary, 
Prince, William Meade, 



Winston-Salem. 

Winstou-Salem. 

Durham. 

Hamilton. 

Ohapel Hill. 

Wilmington. 

Smithfleld. 

Winston-Salem. 

Lenoir. 

Oaks. 

Oaks. 

Kinston. 

Ohapel Hill. 

LaGrange. 

Roxboro. 

Selma. 

Newbern. 

Winterville. 

Charlotte. 

Stephenville, Tex. 

Old Hundred. 

Elon College. 

Wilmington. 

Riggsbee. 

Joppa. 

Pendleton, S. O. 

Raleigh. 

Raleigh. 

Fern. 

Chapel Hill. 

Belhaven. 

Chapel Hill. 

Saluda. 

Chapel Hill. 

Albemarle. 

Chapel Hill. 



144 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL 



Randolph, Arthur Grier, 
Randolph. Edgar Eugene, 
Rankin, Blanche, 
Rawles, Elizabeth, 
Rhew, Emma, 
Rollins, Eugene Marvin, 
Roberson, Nellie, 
Rountree, Louis Gustavus, 
Satterthwait, Ada, 
Satterthwait, Ida, 
Scarborough, Myrtle, 
Scott, Hattie, 
Sherrill, Oscar, 
Sherrod, Lillian, 
Shivers, Virginia, 
Shuford, Osie, 
Sibley, Mrs. S. S., 
Sifford, Ernest, 
Simpson, Evander, 
Smith, Jessie, 
Smith, Mary Herbert, 
Smith, Willie, 
Stafford, William Faris 
Stanford, Carrie, 
Stanford, Margaret, 
Strayhorn, Charles, 
Strowd, Thomas W. , 
Sugg, Annie, 
Sutton, Prances, 
Swain, John Edward, 
Swift, Wiley Hampton 
Swindell, Myrtle, 
Sykes, L. E., 
Tabor, George Leroy, 
Tankard, Irene, 
Taylor, Ada, 
Taylor, Rodema, 



Charlotte. 
Charlotte. 
Whitsett. 
Durham. 
Rougemont. 
Holly Springs 
Chapel Hill. 
Brooklyn, N. 
Sidney. 
Sidney. 
High Point. 
Asheville. 
Catawba. 
High Point. 
Battleboro. 
Gastonia. 
Chapel Hill. 
Charlotte. 
Roseboro. 
Dunn. 

Scotland Neck, 
Durham. 
Fayetteville. 
Teer. 
Teer. 
Hillsboro. 
Chapel Hill. 
Chapel Hill. 
LaGrange. 
Democrat. 
Greensboro. 
Belhaven. 
Rock Springs. 
Chapel Hill. 
Bath. 
LaGrange. 
Efland. 



Y. 



STUDENTS IN SUMMER SCHOOL 



146 



Terrell, Leona, 

Thompson, Julia, 

Tighe, R. J., 

Thompson, Walter, 

Tomlinson, Annie, 

Turner, Myra, 

Tyson, Lillie Russell, 

Underwood, Samuel M., 

Venable, Cantey McDowell, 

Wakefield, Lula, 

Walker, Essie, 

Ward, Mary, 

Warren, Mrs. Oorinna O., 

Warren, John Waddell, 

Warren, Nannie, 

Watson, Nita, 

Webb, Lucie, 

Webb, Mary, 

Webb, Mrs. M. B., 

Whitaker, William Asbury, Jr., 

White, George W., 

Whitehead, Elizabeth, 

Whitley, Mariana, 

Whitsett, Mrs. G. W., 

Williams, Mrs. H. H., 

Williams, John Roberts, 

Williams, Robert Ransom, 

Wilson, O. W., 

Wilson, Grace, 

Wilson, Luna, 

Wilson, O'Nora G., 

Winborne, Mary, 

Winborne, James Wallace, 

Windley, Lena, 

Winfield. Mrs. Florence, 

Woltz, Albert Edward, 

Zerban, Fritz, 



Cedar Grove. 

Joppa. 

Asheville. 

Concord. 

High Point . 

Hillsboro. 

Salisbury. 

Gray Chapel. 

Chapel Hill. 

Lenoir. 

Coinjock. 

Asheville. 

Durham. 

Edenton. 

Corbett. 

Henderson. 

Warren Plains. 

Scotland Neck. 

Chapel Hill. 

Winston- Salem . 

Guilford College. 

Scotland Neck. 

Williamston. 

Greensboro. 

Chapel Hill. 

Apex. 

Newton. 

Scotland Neck. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Caldwell Institute . 

Baltimore, Md. 

Beaufort. 

Mege. 

Washington. 

Chocowinity. 

Lenoir. 

Germany. 



THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. 



OFFICERS. 



Eben Alexander, Ph.D., LL.D., Supervisor. 
Ciiaules Lk.e Raper, Ph.D., Committeeman. 
Charles Alphoxso Smith, Ph.D , Committeeman. 
Louis Round Wilson, A.M., Librarian. 
Charles Carroll Barnhakdt, Assistant. 
James Stevens Kerr, Assistant. 
Roy Melton Brown, Assistant. 
Charles James Hendlky, Assistant. 

The University Library contains forty-two thousand five hundred and 
ninety-four volumes and about sixteen thousand pamphlets. The collec- 
tion of books is being re-classified and re-catalogued according to the 
Dewey, or decimal system. 

The Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies have made a donation 
of their valuable collections to the Library, and have provided for its per- 
petual endowment. The official title of the Library is now The Library of 
the University of North Carolina endowed by the Philanthropic and Dia- 
lectic Literary Societies. 

The funds available for the increase of the Library are expended under 
the direction of the Supervisor, the Librarian, and the Library Committee, 
with special reference to the instruction given in the University. The 
annual increase from purchase, bequests, and exchanges averages about 
one thousand volumes. The books are carefully classified and catalogued 
by author, subject, and' title. 

Extensive improvements in the arrangement and administration of the 
Library have been made in the direction of better light, more room, and 
greater efficiency and comfort. The Librarian and the Assistant Libra- 



THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 147 

rians are in attendance to give help in any line of research or reading. The 
reading room is supplied with the best foreign and American periodicals 
and the leading newspapers of the State and Nation. The students of 
the University have access, under necessary limitations, to the book- 
shelves. The Library and reading room are open on week days from 8:45 
a. m. to 1:15 p. m., and from 2:00 p. m. to 5:00 p.m.; on week day evenings, 
Saturday excepted, from 7:30 P. M. to. 9:00 p. m.; on Sunday from 2:45 
p. m. to 3:45 P. m. 

During the year the University has received from Miss Mary Groome, of 
the Class of 11J02, and from Mr. Eugene Morehead Armfield, of the Class of 
1888, two gifts in money which it has set apart to serve as two special 
Library funds. The collections which have been established by means of 
these gifts are known as the Groome Collection of Southern Poetry and 
the Armfield Collection of English Philology. 

Again the University has received the hearty support of the Philan- 
thropic and Dialectic Literary Societies in carrying on the work of Library 
re organization. 

The University acknowledges other gifts to the Library during the year 
from Cyrus Adler, Agricultural and Mechanical College, American Mu- 
seum of Natural History, Atlanta Carnegie Library, Chas. Baskerville, 
H. W. Bell, Boston Public Library. Mrs. Bridgers, J. D. Bruner, Wm. 
Cain, Carnegie Institution, Carnegie Steel Company, Charlotte Carnegie 
Library, Chronique de France Pub. Co., Walter Clarke, W. O. Coker, 
W. H. Collins, Geo. Davidson, Pierre De Caubertin, D. L. Gore, S. B. 
Gosnold, Harvard University, Archibald Henderson, L. L. Hobbs, Alex. 
Hogg, George Howe, Imperial Japanese Commission, Indiana General 
Assembly, Iowa State Historical Society, Jewish Society of America, John 
Crerar Library, Miss Alice Jones, J. Y. Joyner, C. O. Kahler, Kansas 
State Historical Society, W. W. Kitchin, Lafayette College, Library of 
Congress, Maryland Bureau of Labor and Statistics, Massachusetts Bureau 
of Labor and Statistics and State Board of Charities, H. E. Mowen, New 
Jersey State Library, New York State Library, North Carolina Govern- 
ment and Officers, Ohio State Historical Society, Pennsylvania Historical 
Society and Sons of the Revolution, J. S. Pierson, Providence Public 
Library, F. L. Riley, Royal Society of Canada, St. Louis Public Library, 
M. O. Sherrill, Sigma Nu Fraternity, C. A Smith, Smithsonian Institu- 



148 TTIE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

tion, State Normal and Industrial College, E. H. Taylor, W. D. Toy, Trin- 
ity College Library, Union Club of New York City, United States Super- 
intendent of Public Documents and other Federal Officeis and Depart- 
ments, University of Chicago, J. I. Vance, F. P. Venable, West Virginia 
Bureau of Labor and Statistics, H. V. Wilson, Wisconsin Historical Soci- 
ety, Yackety Yack Committee, Young Men's Christian Association of 
America, Advocate of Peace, American Economist, Case and Comment, 
Caucasian, Central Presbyterian, Chapel Hill News, Christian Advocate, 
Columbia University Quarterly, Commonwealth, Duplin Journal, Ex- 
changes of the Tar Heel and of the University Magazine, Fayetteville 
Observer, Fisherman and Farmer, Franklin Times, Gospel Messenger, 
Greensboro Record, Harbinger, Henderson Times, Herald of Gospel Lib- 
erty, Hickory Democrat, Hickory Press, Homiletic Review, King's Weekly, 
La Grange Sentinel, Lenoir Topic, Mooresville Enterprise, Morganton 
News-Herald, New Voice, Newton Enterprise, Polk County News, Pres- 
byterian Standard, Progressive Farmer, Raleigh Christian Advocate, Ral- 
eigh Times, Religious Herald, Roanoke-Chowan Times, Salvation, Smith- 
field Herald, Sound Currency, Southern Presbyterian, Statesville Land- 
mark, Success, Sylvan Valley News, Tar Heel, Technology Review, Texas 
School Journal, Texas Quarterly, Trinity Archive, Twin-City Daily Sen- 
tinel, University Magazine, Virginian-Pilot, Watchtower, Webster's 
Weekly, Williamston Enterprise, Wilmington Messenger, Wilson Times, 
Windsor Ledger, Woman's Home Companion. 



THE WILLIAM PKESTON BYNUM, JR, 
. GYMNASIUM. 



Alfred Dana Browne, Instructor in Physical Training. 

The William Preston Bynum, Jr., Gymnasium, the gift of Judge Wil- 
liam Preston Bynum, in memory of his grandson, William Preston Bynum, 
Jr., of the class of 1893, is a handsome, two-storied brick building, fur- 
nished with modern apparatus, swimming pool, baths, lockers, and run- 
ning track. It contains also the trophy room and the office of the Instruc- 
tor in Physical Training. 

Exercise in the Gymnasium is required three hours a week of all the 
students in College except Seniors. A thorough physical examination of 
each student is made in the fall, and, in case students desire it, another in 
the spring. The measurements are indicated in a Prescription of Exercise 
pamphlet and are furnished to the students free of charge in the fall term. 
This book contains directions for the developing of every part of the body 
as well as suggestions on hygiene and personal care of the body; it is free 
from technicalities and confusing terms. Too much importance cannot be 
attached to the physical examination, since it enables the student to 
work intelligently and economize his time. The physical examination is 
designed to aid the student by pointing out defects, and causing him to 
direct his efforts toward the correction of them. 



LABORATOEIES AND MUSEUMS. 



THE PHYSICAL LABORATORY. 

Joshua Walker Gore, C. E. , Director and Professor of Phytics. 
James Edward Latta, A.M., Associate Professor of Physics. 
Gustavds Chambers Crawford, A.M., Associate Professor of Physics. 
Albert Whitehead Latta, Ph. B. , Assistant in Physics. 

The Physical Laboratory occupies the eastern half of the main floor and 
almost the whole of the basement floor of the Alumni Building, amount- 
ing to about seven thousand square feet of floor space. 

The main floor is divided into a lecture room, an apparatus room, labor- 
atory for students in the general course, Physics 1, and a laboratory for 
X-ray and photometric work. 

In the rooms o2 the basement are located the dynamos, motors, elec- 
trical laboratory, electric furnaces, storage battery, and the workshops for 
wood and metal. 

A special appropriation granted by the Legislature in 1903, has made it 
possible to equip the Physical Laboratory with standard types of electrical 
machines: dynamos, motors, transformers m:ters, switchboard, storage 
battery, electric furnace, and the accessories, needed for practical instruc- 
tion in electrical engineering. The facilities for the general teaching of 
Physics experimentally have likewise been increased. 

The electric light and central heating plants constitute valuable adjuncts 
to the laboratory. 

THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

Francis Preston Venable, Ph.D., D. So.* LL.D., Director and Professor 
of Theoretical Chemistry. 



THE CHKMICAL LABORATORY 151 

Alvin Sawyer Wheeler, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Organic Chemis- 
try. 
James Edward Mills, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
Royall Oscar Eugene Davis, Ph.D., Instructor in Physical Chemistry. 
Williams McEim Mahhioit, S.B., Assistant in Chemistry. 
Wade Hampton Oldham, Assistant in Chemistry. 
Edgar Eugene Randolph, A.B., Assistant in Chemistry. 

The building formerly known as Person Hall is now used as the Chemi- 
cal Laboratory. It has been enlarged and forms a convenient and well- 
arranged system of laboratories for a limited number of workers. The 
rooms are eleven in number and contain about six thousand square feet of 
floor space. The pitch of the rooms is twenty feet, and they are lighted 
by numerous large windows, five feet by ten in size. 

There is a large lecture room with a seating capacity of one hundred and 
fifty. The sides and rear of the room have glass cases for the display of 
a handsome line of specimens, scientific and technical. The room is lighted 
by electricity and gas. In addition to its use as a lecture room, it is used 
as a place of meeting by the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society. 

Adjoining the lecture room is the private laboratory of the Director, and 
a smaller room for the storage of specimens and finer apparatus. The west 
wing of the laboratory is divided into laboratories for qualitative and quan- 
titative analysis, furnishing desk-space for one hundred and twenty-two 
and twenty-eight students respectively. There is a small room, cut off 
from the other laboratories, in which dangerous or disagreeable experi- 
ments may be performed. 

The rear portion of the laboratory is almost a reproduction of the front 
in size and outline. It is divided into a balance room, containing nine 
modern balances and one assay balance, a library, a room with desk-space 
for five students in special work, an assay room provided with a set of gas 
furnaces, a laboratory for toxicological, physiological, or other special 
work, and a store room. In the assay room is placed a large still, which 
provides an abundance of distilled water. 

The laboratories are supplied with water providing good suction. A new 
and modern gas machine, which supplies ample heat, has recently been 
installed. The_average expenditure for apparatus amounts to fifteen hun- 



152 LABORATORIES AND MUSEUMS 

died dollars annually . Recently apparatus for gas analysis and many lines 
of technical work have been purchased; also a new vacuum pump, electric 
furnace, Steinheil grating spectroscope, and other apparatus for refined 
and accurate work. A room has been fitted up in the New West Building 
for work in physical chemistry. Another room in the basement of 
Alumni Hall is provided with electric furnaces and the modern apparatus 
for demonstration of the application of electricity to chemical technology. 



THE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY AND MUSEUM. 

Henry Van Peters Wilson, Ph.D., Director and Professor of Zoology. 
William Chambers Ooker, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 
William Herbert Kibler, Assistant in Zoology. 
Robert Frederick Leinbach, Assistant in Zoology. 
William Gray Amick, Assistant in Zoology. 
Harry Ardell Allard, Assistant in Botany. 

The Biological Laboratory occupies the fourth floor and a part of the 
third floor of the New East Building, and includes a lecture room, a main 
laboratory, three smaller laboratories for advanced students in Zoology 
and Botany, two private workrooms, and a storeroom. The entire floor 
space is something over four thousand square feet. 

The equipment is especially adapted to the needs of modern microscopi- 
cal work, and includes compound and dissecting microscopes, microtomes, 
parafin and hot air baths, incubator, camera lucidas, immersion lenses, etc . 
All rooms in the laboratory are supplied with running water. In addition 
to the sinks, there are several large aquarium tables in which living ani- 
mals may be kept for breeding purposes, study of their habits, or class 
work. 

The museum collections are arranged in cases in the main laboratory. 
The marine fauna of the Atlantic coast is well represented. There are 
very serviceable collections of bird skins, bird eggs, insects, algae, and 
flowering plants. Students engaged in advanced zoological work have 
access to microscopic preparations, illustrating the classification, anatomy, 
and development of sponges and corals, the histology of medusae, the 
development of amphibia and teleosts, and other subjects of morphological 



THE GEOLOGICAL LABORATORY AND MUSEUM 153 

interest. Students of Botany have the use of many preparations illustrat- 
ing the anatomy and embryology of plants. The departmental library 
includes many valuable books of reference, treatises, zoological and botan- 
ical journals. 



THE GEOLOGICAL LABORATORY AND MUSEUM. 

Collier Cobb, A.M., Director, and Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 
Joseph Austin Holmes, S.B., State Geologist, Professor of Mining Geol- 
ogy- 
Joseph Hyde Pratt, Ph.D., Professor of Economic Geology. 
Robert Gilliam Lassiter, Assistant in Field Geology. 
George Mallett MacNider, Assistant in Geology. 
Rex William Perry, Assistant in Geology. 

The Geological Laboratory occupies the first floor of the New East 
Building. In addition to a lecture room with a seating capacity of about 
ninety, there is a large laboratory supplied with working collections of 
minerals, rocks, and fossils, and with photographs, maps, and models illus- 
trating geological structure. The laboratory is furnished with two petro- 
grapliical microscopes, and with apparatus for the slicing and polishing of 
rocks. Microscopic slides have been made of most of the specimens from 
North Carolina; and the department has, also, sections of the typical 
European rocks. Sections of the rocks around Chapel Hill, and the igne- 
ous rocks of the Boston Basin, made by the late Hunter Lee Harris, of the 
class of 1889, were given to the geological department A room for photo- 
graphic work has recently been added. 

The University possesses a collection of more than two thousand speci- 
mens of typical rocks and minerals from various European localities, and 
of large specimens of building stones, coals, and various products illustrat- 
ing the economic geology of the State. These are arranged in an exhibi- 
tion room of six hundred and fifty square feet of floor space. Here are 
kept also the sections taken with a diamond drill in the coal regions of 
Pennsylvania, in the region around King's Mountain, where the Summer 
School of Geology held its sessions, in the Dan River coal fields and in the 
Triassic Rocks at Durham, N. C, A complete set of the ores of th e 



154 LABORATORIES AND MUSEUMS 

precious metals found along the line of the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa F^ 
Railroad is included in the collection. Valuable additions have been made 
to the collections of fossils also, affording increased opportunity for labora- 
tory work in historical geology and palaeontology. The collection illustra- 
ting economic geology has been largely increased. 

The department library, which occupies a room adjoining the exhibition 
room, is supplied with State and United States Reports, the papers of 
working geologists, the best works upon Geology, and scientific peri- 
odicals. 



THE UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS. 



THE DIALECTIC AND PHILANTHROPIC LITERARY 
SOCIETIES. 

The Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies were organized in 
1795, the year of the opening of the University. Their existence has been 
inseparably linked with that of the University, and they have shown 
remarkable power in developing character as well as in training the intel- 
lect. They offer facilities for practice in debate, oratory, declamation, and 
essay writing; and their members become practically familiar with parlia- 
mentary law and usage. 

Each society owns a large, handsomely furnished hall, the walls of 
which are hung with oil portraits of illustrious members. Meetings are 
held by each society every Saturday evening during the college year, 
admission being confined to members. Public contests in debate between 
the two societies are conducted twice a year and, in addition to these, 
there is a system of intercollegiate debates. On Monday evening of Com- 
mencement week the Inter-society Banquet is held, after which each soci- 
ety has its annual reunion. On Tuesday evening preceding Commence- 
ment Day four representatives elected from the two societies have a public 
competition in debate, and a prize is awarded to the successful competi- 
tors. 

By immemorial custom, students from the eastern half of the State 
usually join the Philanthropic Society, while those from the western half 
join the Dialectic Society. Although membership in the Societies is 
entirely optional, yet it is earnestly recommended by the Faculty as fur. 
nishing unusual opportunities not only for literary culture, but also for 
the development of self-control and the power to persuade and control 
others. 



166 THE UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS 

THE ELISHA MITCHELL SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY. 

William Cain, O.E., President. 

James Edward Mills, Ph.D., Vice-President. 

Francis Preston Venable, Ph.D.,D.Sc, LL.D., Permanent Secretary and 

Treasurer . 
Alvin Sawyer Wheeler, Ph.D., Recording Secretary. 

The Blisha Mitchell Scientific Society holds monthly meetings during 
the college year for the discussion of scientific subjects. A Journal, 
which is the official organ of the North Carolina Academy of Science, is 
issued quarterly. The object of the Society is to encourage scientific 
research and to record such matters as pertain to the natural history of the 
State. The membership is at present restricted to the Faculty and stu- 
dents of the University, and members of the staff of the Geological Sur- 
vey. 

At the monthly meetings, which are ordinarily held on the second Tues- 
day of each month, excellent opportunities are afforded the students to 
get beyond the ordinary routine of the class room by hearing, reading, and 
discussing papers on scientific subjects. 

The Journal is in a measure a bulletin of the scientific laboratories of 
the University, and contains many articles written by research students. 
It is now in the twenty-first year. The volumes already issued contain 
twenty-two hundred pages. By the exchange of the Journal with more 
than three hundred scientific journals and periodicals, over ten thousand 
books and pamphlets have been collected, all of which are arranged in the 
University Library. 

NORTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Kemp Plummer Battle, LL.D., President. 

Charles Lee Raper, Ph.D., Vice-President and Permanent Secretary. 

Marcus Cicero Stephens Noble, Treasurer. 

John Henry Vaughan, Ph.B., Recording Secretary. 

The North Carolina Historical Society was founded in 1843 by the Hon. 
David L. Swain, LL.D., President of the University. Under his leader- 



THE PHILOLOGICAL CLUB 



157 



ship it became the centre of historical work in the State and the medium 
of many notable contributions to State history. On March 22, 1875, 
through the activity of Dr. Battle, the Society was chartered by an act of 
the General Assembly. The purpose of the Society is to collect, classify, 
investigate, and publish material illustrative of the history of the State. 
The Historical Society possesses a valuable collection of books, pamphlets, 
manuscripts, newspaper files, coiDs, and other subjects of historic interest. 
The educational aim of the Society is to create a love for historical study 
and to give training in scientific methods of historical investigation. To 
this end meetings are held monthly in the History lecture room, at which 
papers, based on original research, are read and discussed. All members 
of the University are eligible to membership. 

THE SHAKSPERE CLUB. 

Thomas Home, D.D.,LL.D., President. 

John McLaren McBryde, Ph.D., Vice-President. 

Isaac Clark Wright, Secretary. 

The Shakspere Club was organized in October, 1885, for the special pur- 
pose of giving impulse and guidance to scholarly investigation of the great 
dramatist. But an important aim was to offer opportunity for compara- 
tive studies in the dramatic literature of ancient and modern languages, 
and also to excite interest in the art 'Of literary composition. Seminary 
methods are pursued by advanced students, and the results are presented 
in papers. The Club bas a small but valuable collection of special reference 
books. Meetings axe held monthly. 

THE PHILOLOGICAL CLUB. 

Charles Alphonso Smith, Ph.D., President. 
John McLaren McBryde, Ph.D., Vice-President. 
George Howe, Ph.D., Secretary and Treasurer. 

The Philological Club meets on the first Tuesday evening of each month 
during the college year. Its membership consists of the instructors and 
advanced students in the language departments of the University. The 



158 THE UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS 

object of the Club is to stimulate original investigation in philology 
and to afford an opportunity for the interchange of views on sub- 
jects relating to such work. At each meeting papers are read and dis- 
cussed. All persons interested in the work of the Club are invited to 
attend its meetings. 

THE ECONOMICS SOCIETY. 

Charles Lee Raper, Ph.D., President. 
John Kenyon Wilson, Secretary. 

The Economics Society, to which any advanced student of Economics 
and Finance may belong, meets twice a month for the discussion of South- 
ern industrial problems. 

No other section of the United States has so many important and inter- 
esting economic problems to solve as the Southern States at the present 
time. The Economics Society was organized under the conviction that 
the intelligent Southern man is the one upon whom the solution of these 
problems rests'. 

The following are some of the problems which have been considered 
during the current year: The South as a place of manufactures; Southern 
white labor; Southern negro labor; Southern wages; Southern labor 
unions; Child labor in Southern factories. 

THE MODER.N LITERATURE CLUB. 

Charles Alphonso Smith, Ph.D., President. 
Thomas Bragg Higdon, Vice-President. 
Frank McLean, Secretary and Treasurer. 

In December, 1904, the Modern Literature Club was formed. It is com- 
posed of the members of the Faculty and student body who are interested 
in modern literary movements, and who signify their willingness to read 
original papers at the monthly meetings of the Club. This organization 
fills a niche in University life and has already vindicated the wisdom of 
its founders. 



YOUNG men's christian association 159 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

Charles Carroll Barnhardt, President. 
Walter Bennett Love, Vice-President. 
William Shearer Hunter, Secretary. 
William Henry Lee Mann, Treasurer. 

The Young Men's Christian Association is a voluntary organization of 
the students of the University, and is entirely under their management. 
The Faculty are in sympathy with the Association, and render service 
whenever requested to do so. 

The object of the Associ ition is to promote growth in grace and Chris- 
tian fellowship among its members and aggressive Christian work among 
the students. To this end three meetings are held every week. 

The Association is now erecting a new building which is to cost twelve 
thousai.d dollars. 

More than one hundred students are enrolled in the Bible classes taught 
by members of the Association. During the next session five Bible courses 
and one Mission course (in three sections) will be offered as follows: — 

Messrs. Spruill, Withers, Pore, Johnson, Cobb, Judd, Brown. 

1. Life of Christ. 

A practical, comprehensive course, based on the life of Christ as 
presented in the four Gospels, with special reference to the histor- 
ical development and application of His teachings. 

Messrs. Hester, Hughes, Day, and Rose. 

2. Studies in the Acts and Epistles. 

With reference to the spread and development of the Christian 
Church, based on a careful study of the Acts of the Apostles and 
the Epistles of Paul. 

Messrs. Miller, Mann, and Leonard. 

3. Old Testament Characters. 

Arranged for daily, personal study with reference to the lives and 
work of Old Testament heroes. 

Messrs. Claytor and Love. 

4. (a) Teaching of Jesus and His Apostles. 

(6) The Apostolic Conception of Jesus and His Mission. 



160 THE UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS 

Professor Battle. 

5. Old Testament Characters. 

Lectures on Sunday, in the University Chapel, 9-9:30 a. m. 

Messrs. Clattor, Hunter, Highsmith, Shannon, Herring, Davidson. 

6. Missions. 

(a) Effective workers in needy fields. 
(6) Regeneration of Japan, 
(c) Medical missions. 

Courses 1, 2, 3, and 4 are given on Sunday, 12:30-1:30 p. m. Course 
6 is given on Sunday evening. 



ONE HUNDRED AND NINTH COM- 
MENCEMENT (1904). 



SUNDAY, MAY 29. 

Baccalaureate Sermon. 
The Reverend James Isaac Vance, D.D. 

Sermon Before the Young Men's Christian Association. 
The Reverend G. H. Detwiler, D.D. 

TUESDAY, MAY 31. 

The Alumni Address. 
Hon. Francis Donnell Winston, Esquire, Class of '79. 

The Debate by Representatives from the Dialectic and Philan- 
thropic Literary Societies. 
Dialectic. Philanthropic. 

Charles Walter Miller, Henry Stuart Lewis, 

Charles Carroll Barnhardt. John Kenyon Wilson. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, COMMENCEMENT DAY. 

senior speakers. 

Erasmus Alston Daniel, Jr., Lawrence Erastus Rudisill, 

James Horner Winston, Edgar Samuel Williamson Dameron. 



COMMENCEMENT 
THE COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS. 

John Huston Finley, Ph.D , LL.D. 

DEGREES IN COURSE. 

Bachelors of Arts. 



Gray Archer, 

Clarence Edward Betts, 

Addison Gorgas Brenizer, Jr., 

Albert Lyrnan Cox, 

Edgar Samuel Williamson Dameron, 

Erasmus Alston Daniel, Jr., 

"William Wooten Eagles, 

William Fisher, Jr., 

Fletcher Harrison Gregory, 

Severn Green Haigh, 

Alfred Williams Haywood, Jr., 

William Picard Jacocks, 



Graham Kenan, 
Wade Hampton Mann, 
Robert Oliver Miller, 
George Willis Oldham, 
Edgar Eugene Randolph, 
Willie Calvin Rankin, 
Sidney Swaim Robins, 
Lawrence Erastus Rudisill, 
Charles Phillips Russell, 
Marshall Cobb Staton, 
Theodore King Sutton, 
James Horner Winston. 



Bachelors of Philosophy. 



Ernest Franklin Bohannon 
Edward Augustus Council, 
Virgil Clayton Daniels, 
William Dunn, Jr., 
Neill Ray Graham, 
Ralph Moore Harper, 
Thomas Felix Hickerson, 
Rolanda Clarence Holton, 
Andrew Hall Johnston, 
Albert Whitehead Latta, 



Luther Bynum Lockhart, 
Walter Frederick McCanless, 
Evander McNair Mclver, 
John Sprunt Newton, 
William Ewell Osborne, 
Ernest Linwood Sawyer, 
Ernest Sifford, 
John Henry Vaughan, 
William Asbury Whitaker, Jr., 
Harry Wooding Winstead, 
Walter Poole Wood. 



DEGREES IN COURSE 163 

Bachelors of Science. 

Harry Barber Frost, Williams McKim Marriott, 

Lawrence Shackleford Holt, Jr. , Theodore Davidson Morrison, 

James Preston Irwin, Wesley Benton Owen, Jr., 

George Anderson Johnston, John Henry Pearson, Jr., 

Welborn Earl Pharr. 

Bachelors of Laws. 

Theodore Garfield Britton, 

Robert Withington Herring, Ph.B., 1903, 

Joseph Bonn Ramsey. 

Graduates in Pharmacy. 

Numa Duncan Bitting, John Thomas Howell, 

John Gustavus Greene, John Bnnyan LeGwin. 

Master of Science. 

Robert Arthur Lichtenthaeler, S.B., 1902. 
i 
Masters of Arts. 

i William Stanly Bernard, A.B., 1900, 
Albert Lyman Cox, 
William Jones Gordon, A.B., 1903, 
Joseph Bascomb Huff, A.B., Wake Forest, 1902, 
Alice Edward Jones, Ph.B., 1900, 
Marvin Hendrix Stacy, Ph.B., 1902. 

♦Doctors of Medicine. 

Zebulon Marvin Caveness, William DeBerniere MacNider , 

Willis Dowd Gilmore, Martin Luther Matthews. 

♦.Degrees conferred May 5, 1904, at the closing exercises of the Medical School. 



1B4 

COMMENCEMENT 

HONORARY DEGREES. 

Doctor of Letters. 
Robert Paine Pell. " 
Doctor of Laws. 
Charles Duncan Mclver. 

MEDALS, PRIZES, AND FELLOWSHIPS. 

The Hume Medal: Charles Phillips Russell. 

The Harris Prize: Robert Frederick Leinbach. 

The Greek Prize: Victor Lee Stephenson. 

The Worth Prize: Sidney Swaim Robins. 

The Library Pr, ZES: Thomas Bragg Higdon, Otho Bescent Ross 

The Early English Text Society Pr, ze: Louis Round Wi] A M 

SoSty BlNGHAM PRI ^ : H6Dry StUart LeWlS ' ° f the P^anthropic 
The Bryan Prize: John Kenyon Wilson. 
The Mangom Medal: Edgar Samuel Williamson Dameron 
The Bradham Prize: John Bunyan LeGwin. 
The Hill Fellowship: John Henry Vaughan. 



CERTIFICATES. 






Chemistry: E. F. Bohannon, J. P. w,, G . A . Johnston> R A ^ 

tenthaeler. L. B. Lockhart, W. M. Marriott, Ernest Sifford, W. A 
Whitaker. 

Economics: A. H. Johnston, W. E. Osborne, E. L. Sawyer 
English: N. R. Graham, J. B. Huff, W. F. McCanless, E. E. Ran- 
dolph, C. P. Russell. 



CERTIFICATES 165 

French: Gray Archer, W. P. Jacocks, W. E. Osborne, W. O. Rankin, 
J. H. Winston. 

Geology and Mineralogy: R. A. Lichtenthaeler. 

German: W. O. Rankin. 

Greek: W. H. Mann. 

History: E. E. Randolph, E. L. Sawyer, J. H. Vanghan. 

Latin: Gray Archer, W. C. Rankin, J. H. Winston. 

Pedagogy: G. A. Johnston, W. E. Osborne, J. H. Vaughan. 

Physics: A. L. Cox, T. F. Hickerson, H. B. Frost, T. D. Morrison, 
J. H. Pearson. 



THE ASSOCIATION OF THE ALUMNI. 



THE GENERAL ASSOCIATION. 

Thomas Stephen Kenan, A.B., President. 
Henry Armand London, A.B., Secretary. 

The membership includes all persons who have matriculated at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina in any department except the Summer School 
and all who are or have been officers of the institution. 

An effort is now being made to accomplish a more thorough organiza- 
tion of the Alumni. The desire is that the individual alumni shall form 
into Local Alumni Associations in every community. These Local Asso- 
ciations are to form by proportional representation the General Associa- 
tion of the Alumni. The next meeting of the General Association will be 
held in GerrardHall at the University at the Commencement in June, 
1905 Local Associations have been formed in certain cities and others 
will be established in the course of the year. It is hoped that every alum- 
nus will concern himself in assisting the organization in his county or 
town. A printed statement of the plan of organization has been prepared 
and will be supplied on request. Inquiries should be directed to Mr. 
James C. Taylor, Secretary of the Alumni, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Professor McGehee will not be present at the Summer Law School in 
1905. Dr. Thomas Ruffin and Mr. J. Crawford Biggs, both former 
Professors of Law at the University, will lecture in course. 

Dr. K. P. Battle, Ex-Chief- Justice James E. Shepherd, Mr. P. H. Bus- 
bee, and other distinguished judges and lawyers are expected to deliver 
occasional lectures during the term. 



Additions and Corrections. 



To the roll of Students, pages 109-130, are to be added the names of the 
following, who were registered late in the session: 

Sophomore Class. 



Name. 
Boone, Elmer William, 



Year. 

Elect., 

Students in Pharmacy. 



Hunter, Thomas White, 
Young, Cadmus Turner, 



First, 
Second, 



Residence. 
Graham. 



Charlotte. 
Clayton. 



On page 112, in place of Burwood, George Norwood, read Butler, George 
Norwood. 



Under the Philological Club, page 157, read: 

George Howe, Ph.D., Vice-President. 

John McLaren McBryde, Jr., Ph.D., Secretary and Treasurer. 



GENEEAL SUMMAET. 



Boards of Government and Instruction and Other Officers. 

Trustees 80 

Professors 38 

Instructors 11 

Assistants 17 

— 66 

Summer School Faculty 25 

Other Officers 10 

Students. 
The College:— 

Senior Class 63 

Junior Class 66 

Sophomore Class 113. 

Freshman Class 166 

408 

The Graduate Department 84 

The Law Department: — 

Students, Regular Session 51 

Students, Summer Term 50 

101 

Deduct for names counted twice 10 

91 

je Department of Medicine: — 

Fourth- Year Students 9 

Third- Year Students 9 

Second- Year Students 27 

First- Year Students 55 

— 100 
The Department of Pharmacy: — 

Second- Year Students 7 

First- Year Students 42 

— 49 
The Summer School 238 

Whole number of students '. 920 

Deduct for names counted twice 50 

870 



INDEX. 



Absences, 70. 

Examinations for excess of, 71. 
Act of Incorporation, 8 
Administration. Officers of, 17. 
Admission of Students not Candidates for 
a degree, 25. 
Women, 11. 
Requirements for, 22. 
to Advanced Standing, 25. 
the College, 22. 

Department of Applied 

Sciences, 21, 58. 
Department of Medicine, 

90, 92, 97. 
Dept. of Pharmacy, 108. 
Graduate Department, 48. 
Law Department, 82. 
Aid, Eecuniary, 64, 65, 66. 
Alumni Association, The, 166. 
Anatomy, Courses in, 88. 
Assignment of Rooms, 69. 
. Athletics, 11, 74, 149. 

Eligibility to, 74. 
Attendance, Medical, 12. 

upon Chapel, 12, 72. 
Bachelor's Degrees, 11, 26, 58,162, 163. 
Bible Study, Courses in, 159. 
Biological Laboratory, The, 152. 
Biology, Courses in, 44, 56, 87, 103. 
Board, 67. 82, 97. 

Botany, Courses in, 45, 56, 88, 103, 137.. 
Calendar, 7. 

Candidacy, for Advanced Degrees, 48, 61. 
. Certificates, Entrance, 22. 

in the College, 75, 164. 

Law Department, 80. 
Summer School, 134. 
Chapel Exercises, 12, 72. 
Charter of the University, 8 
Chemical Laboratory, The, 150. 
Chemistry, Courses in, 42, 55, 58, 87, 101. 
Children, Diseases of, 95 
Christian Association, The, 159. 
City Free Dispensary, The, 96. 
College, The, 22. 

Admission, 22. 
Expenses, 66. 
Fellowships, 64. 
Registration, 69. 
Scholarships, 64, 
Year, 11. 
Commencement, 11, 75, 161. 
Committees, of the Trustees, 16. 
Faculty, 20. 
Conditions, Entrance, 25. 

Examinations for the Removal 
of, 73. 
Conduct, 12, 72, 75. 



Contents, Table of, 3. 
Contracts for Rooms, 69. 
Courses, Changes in, 70. 

for Students not Candidates for 

a Degree, 27. 
• Teachers, 28. 

Bachelor of Arts, 26. 
Laws, 80. 
Science, 58. 
Doctor of Medicine, 86, 92, 96. 
Graduate in Pharmacy ,99,106. 
Culture, General, 12. 

Religious, 12. 
Damage to University Property, 66, 69. 
Deems Fund, The, 66. 
Deficiencies, Removal of, 72. 
Degree of Bachelor of Arts, 11, 26, 162. 
Laws, 11, 80, 163. 
Philosophy, 162. 
Science, 11, 58, 163. 
Doctor of Letters, 164 
Doctor of Laws, 164. 
Doctor of Medicine, 11, 96, 163. 

Philosophy, 11,49. 
Graduate in Pharmacy, 11, 106, 

163. 
Master of Arts, 11, 49, 163. 

Science, 11, 61, 163. 
Degrees, Conferred in 1904, 162. 

Courses leading to, 26, 49, 50, 68, 
78, 80, 86, 92, 99. 
Discipline, 12, 72, 75. 
Diseases of Children, 95. 

the Ear, Nose, and Throat, 96. 
Eye, 95. 
Skin, etc., 96. 
Nervous and Mental, 96. 
Dispensary, The City Free, 96. 
Doctor of Medicine, 11, 96, 163. 
Doctor of Philosophy, 11, 49. 
Donors to the Library, 147. 
Dormitory Accommodations, 67. 
Drawing, Courses in, 40, 137. 
Ear, Diseases of, 95. 
Economics, Courses in, 38, 54. 

Society, 158. 
Education. See Pedagogy. 
Elegibility, for Athletic Teams, 74. 

Fraternities, 74. 
Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society, 156. 
English, Courses in, 34, 52, 135. 
Prizes in, 62, 63. 

Requirements for Admission, 28. 
Entrance, Subjects accepted for, 22. 
Grouping of, 24. 
Equipment, 10. 

Examinations, Absences from, 72. 
Conduct of, 72. 






169 



Examinations, Excuses from, 72. 
for Entrance, 24 

Excess of Absence, 71. 
Removal of Conditions, 73. 
Expenses, in College, 00 

Dept of Medicine./ 91; 97. 
Pharmacy, 1U7. 
Graduate Department, 48,50. 
Law Department. SI. 
Slimmer School, 138. 
Expression. Courses in, 36, 135. 
Eye, Discuses of, 9". 
Faculty, College, 17. 

Department of Medicine, 83, 84. 

Pharmacy, 98. 
Law Department, 78. 
Summer School, 132. 
Fe«s. See Expenses. 
Fellowship, The Hill. 64. 
Finance, Courses in, H8, 54. 
Foundation, of the University, 8. 

Dept. of Medicine, 84. 
Pharmacy, 99. 
Fraternities, 74. 
Free Tuition, 65. 
French. Courses in, 32, 52, 138. 

for Admission, 24. 
Fund, The Deems, 6(\ 
General Hygiene. 95. 
Geography, Courses in, 136, 137. 
Geological Seminary, The, 4li. 
Geology, Courses in, 45. 57, 13C. 

Prize, 62. 
German, Courses in, 31. 51, 138. 
for Admission, 23. 
Literature, Courses in, 31, ."i?. 
Germanic Philology, Courses in, 32, 51. 
Government of the University, 8. 
Grades of Scholarship, G9. 
Graduate Department, 48. 

Admission to, 48. 
Committee, 48. 
Degrees, 49. 
Students in, 109. 
Graduation, 26,74. 

Dept. of Medicine, 96. 

Pharmacy, 1U6. 
Law Department, 80. 
Greek, Courses in, 29, 51, 138. 
for Admission, 22. 
Prize, 62. 
Gymnasium The, lA'.l 
GvneeoloL'v. Courses in, 94. 
Historical Society. The, 156. 
History, Courses in, 37, 54, 136. 
for Admission, 23. 
Fellowship in, 64. 
Holidays, 11. 
Hospitals. 11,85, 90. 
Hygiene, 95. 

Incorporation, Act of, 8 
Infirmary, 11. 

Instruction, Courses of. Pre Greek, etc. 
Plan of. in Dept. of Medi- 
cine, 84. 
Italian. Courses in. 33. 
Journal Club in Chemistry, 44, 56. 
Kindergarten, Courses in," 137. 
Lai oratory, Hiolo^icul. 152. 
Chemical. 151. 
Geological, 153. 
Pharmaceutical, 1C5. 
Physical, 150. 



Latin, Courses in, 30, 51, 138. 
for Admission, 22, 91. 
Law Department, The, 78. 

Admission, 82. 
Courses of Instruction, 78. 
Degree of LL.B., 80. 
Expenses, 81. 
Faculty, 78. 
Lectures, 80. 
Moot Court 81. 
Registration, 82. 
Students, 122. 
Summer School, 82. 
Library, The, 146. 

Course in, 138. 
Donors to, 147. 
Litei ary Societies, 155. 
Loan Funds, 66. 
Location of the Universitv, 9. 

Dept. of Medicine, 85, 92. 
Master's Degrees. See Degrees. 
Materia Medica, Courses in, 89, 101. 
Mathematics, Courses in, 39, 54, 136. 
for Admission, 23, 91. 
Prize in, 62. 
Medals, 62, 164. 
Medical Attendance, 12. 
Medicine, Courses in, 87, 93. 
Dept. of, 83. 

Admis-ion.90, 97. 
Courses of Instruction, 87, 93. 
Degree, 96. 
Entrance, 90, 97. 
Expenses. 91, 97. 
Faculty. 83, 84. 
Foundation . 84 
Location. 85. 92. 
Pecuniary Aid, 91. % 

Plan of Instruction, 85. 
Registration, 92, 97. 
Students in 126. 
Metallurgy, Courses in, 60 
Mineralogy. Courses in, 45, 136. 
Mining, Courses in, 60. 
Minor Surgery. Courses in. 90. 
Modern Languages. See German, etc. 
Moot Court The, 81 
Must-urn. The Biological. 152. 
Geological, 153. 
Nose, Diseases of, 95. 
North Carolina historical Society, 156. 
Obstetrics. Courses in, 94 
Officers, of Administration, 17. 

Other, 20. 
Orations lor Graduation, 75. 

Prize for, 62. 
Organizations of the University, ^55. 
^ Dialectic Society. 155 
Economics Society, 158 
ElishaMitehell Scientific Society, 156. 
Modern Literature Club, 158. 
North Carolina Historical Soc, 156. 
Philanthropic Society, 155. 
Philological Club, 157. 
Shakespeare Club, 157 
Young Men s Christian Asso , 159. 
Pathology, Courses in, i). <, 95 
Pecuniary Aid, in College, 64. 

Dept. of Medicine, 91. 
Pedagogy. Courses in, 46. 57, l;i5 
Pharmacology, Courses in, 89, 101. 
Pharmacy, Courses in, 100. 

Arrangement of, 99. 



170 



INDEX 



Pharmacy, Dept. of, OS. 

Admission, 109 
Courses of Instruc- 
tion, 100. 
Examinations, 104. 
Expenses, 107, 
Faculty. 98 
Foundation, 90. 
Optional Courses, 103. 
Prizes, 107. 
Quizzes, 105. 
Registration, 108. 
Requirements for 

Graduation, 1U0 
Students, 120. 
Theses, 100 
Philosophy, Courses in. :s6, 53. 

Prize in, (13. 
Photography, Course in, 136. 
Physical Training, II, 74, U9. 
Physical Laboratory, The, 150. 
Physics, Courses in,' 41, 55, 87, 101, 13G. 

for Admission, 21. 
Phvsiology, Courses in, 89, 102, 137. 
Political Science, Prize in, 63. 
Prescription Filling, 103. 
Prizes, ea. fli. 107, 104. 
Quizzes, lii5- 
Registration, in College, 69. 

Dept. of Medicine. 92, 97. 
Pharmacy, 108. 
Law Dept., 82. 
Regulations Regarding Students, 69. 
Religious Culture. 12. 
Requirements for Admission, into 
College, 22. 

lJept. of Medicine, 90, 97. 
Requirements for Graduation, 20, 49. 
in Dept. of Medicine, 96. 

Pharmacy,- 10G. 
Law Dept., 80. 
Romance Languages, Courses in, 32, 52. 
Rooms, Assignment of, 69. 
Schedule of Examinations, 77. 

forexcessof Absences, 71. 

Removal of Conditions, 73. 
Schedule of Recitations, 76. 
Scholarships, 64, 91. 



Shalcspire Club, The, 15". 
Societies. See Organizations. 
Spanish, Courses in, ;i:i. 
Speakers at Commencement, 75, 1GL. • 
Standing, 69. 

Students ftot Candidates for si Degree,25,27. 
College. 10.'. 
Graduate, 11, 109. 
Law. 122. 
Medicine, 126, 
Pharmacy, 129. 
Summer School, 139. 
Studies, Elective. 27. 

Required, 25. 
Summary, 131. 

i.y States, 131. 
General, 167. 
Summer Sehool, I32T" 

Announcement, 133. 
Courses of Study, 135. 
Expenses, 138. 
Faculty, 132. 

Plan of Instruction in, 133. 
Students. 139. 
of Law, 82. 
Surgery, Courses in, 90, 94. 
Therapeutics, 94. 
Theses, Dept. of Pharmacy, lufl. 
for Graduation, 75. 
Times of Presentation, 75. 
Throat, Diseases of, 95. 
Toxicology, Course.^ in. 87, 89, 1,1 il. 
Training, Physical, 11, 74, I4;i. 
Trustees, 13. 
Tuition Fee, in College, 66. 

DepD. of Medicine, 91, 97. 
Pnarmacy, 107. 
Graduate Department, 48. 
Law Department, 81. 
Summer Scnool, 138. 
Tuition, Free, 65, 138. 
Universiry, The, 8. 

Library, 146. 

Organizations. See Organiza- 
tions. 
Year, The College, 11. 
Young Men's Christian Association, l;"9. 



(Announcements 



THE Pall Term of the University 
of North Carolina will beg-in Sep- 
tember 11, 1905; the Spring Term, 
January 2, 1906. 

Registration, September 11, 12, 13, 
1905. Applicants for admission will 
be examined on the days appointed for 
registration. 

-Lectures in the Academic Depart- 
ment and in the Professional Schools 
will begin September 14, 1905. 

Commencement will be on May 31, 
1905; in 1906, on June 6. 

The Summer Law School, June 7- 
August 18, 1905. 

The Summer School for Teachers, 
June 12-July 7, 1905. 

For the Catalogue or for detailed 
information, address 

FRANCIS P. VENABLE, President 
University of North Carolina 
Chapel Hill -